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UK's obesity crisis BLAMED on NHS.

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Atlantico, Nov 21, 2018.

  1. Atlantico

    Atlantico Reactive hypoglycemia · Well-Known Member

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    Just read this article, Daily Express 13 April 2018. To look it up, just type in the 'heading' above.
    Regards
    Atlantico
     
  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    To be fair, the NHS are guided by NICE and other bodies.
     
  4. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    I see my favourite person Alison is clinging to the wreckage.

    "Public Health England’s chief nutritionist Dr Alison Tedstone said: “High-fat diets are often high in calories and can lead to weight gain – this can increase the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some cancers."
     
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  5. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Once again, contrasting views, no wonder people are so confused. Essentially it is about sugar v saturated fat and which is the 'baddie'. We all know of course but when I wonder, will the NHS get it right? I wouldn't even mind if they gave more balanced advice for the general public, ie lower carbs and more good fats' for example, rather than insisting that bread/pasta/rice which I am sure used to be a 'filler upper' is the way to go and lots of it.
     
  6. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't mean to level this at Guzzler, but I don't think there's any 'to be fair' about it: if the NHS was guided by tobacco and alcohol companies and were still giving pregnant women Guiness etc, there'd soon be something said about it. I'm not sure the guidelines they follow are that much less damaging These people claim to be medical professionals, and their bad advice is making people sick on a massive scale. Just LOOK at what they suggest people eat- oatmeal, bananas, baked beans, potatoes, and tasty fruit. Ridiculous.
    There was a doctor back in the old days called Ignatz Semmelweiss, and he worked out that surgeons were handling corpses before delivering children, without washing their hands in between- so the women were dying of infections. He presented this hypothesis, and the reaction was one of outrage: 'How DARE he impugn the good name of our surgeons?/ A gentleman's hands are never dirty.
    That's what you've got today- a Semmelweiss reflex. We tell you fat is bad, eat loads of carbs- things keep getting worse and worse and worse, but if we try to change the advice now we'll lose face.
     
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  7. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    She's a waste of space I heard her on a special on obesity in the summer. She had nothing to contribute that would help the mess people are in through PHE's bad advice.
    D.
     
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  8. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    There is a definite hierarchy when it comes to guidelines. There are the big-wig committees at the top and they set the rules for everyone to follow (and by follow I mean if people refuse to follow we see them being castigated e.g Noakes, Malhotra and Fettke). So what is a lowly NHS dietician to do? He/she can put their head above the parapet risking their carreer/livelihood or they can learn how to manipulate (a la Unwin) the rules to improve patient outcomes. This process is gaining momentum but a far speedier way would be to shoot down the big-wigs with the actual science whilst elbowing Big Food and Big Pharma from the equation.
     
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  9. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    I was watching a YouTube video last night where a number of low carb specialists were answering questions. Dr Phinney was there as we're others.

    One guy had been asked by first nation tribe leaders in North Texas what could they do to combat the raging metabolic syndrome they had in their tribe. Since the tribe had its own soverienty they were not inhibited by keeping to guidelines from the ADA etc.
    So he gave them some advice and it was really funny what happened.

    Item 1: sack the dieticeans.
    Action: Dietitions immediately givern the push! Without their skewed advice they could start getting the right advice on diet and consequent improvements in health for the tribe.

    It will be interesting to see the outcome.
    D.
     
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    #9 lindisfel, Nov 21, 2018 at 9:54 PM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
  10. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    To be fair, I doubt very many people faithfully and meticulously follow the government dietary guidelines.
     
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  11. Honeyend

    Honeyend · Well-Known Member

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    Its a perfect storm of two ingredients.
    Carbs are cheap, produced in large amounts, easy to cook and enable the expensive protein part of the meal look bigger, food companies are able to sell food for huge mark up.
    The low fat diet became the cure for heart disease, it looked like a good idea, it seemed to make sense, so the NHS supported it.
    If people still cooked like they did in the 50's, less processed food and cooked from scratch or the research was analysed more
    carefully perhaps we wouldn't be in the mess we are in now.
    Out of this mess the food companies have made a lot of money and the NHS has spent a lot of money, probably needlessly. As an NHS worker I like to think of it of someone who is being abused, no matter how many times their friend tell them its not working they keep trying to make it work, making excuses and going back.
     
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  12. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    The biggest culprit on my way to becoming obese was diet fuzzy drinks. They kill off the god bugs in your gut. I was advised to drink 2 litres a day and told that diet drinks were a good substitute for water by my health visitor. With the sugar tax and focus on sugary drinks being bad I reckon the obesity crisis will just get worse.
     
  13. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    When I was young we used to have bread and the dripping from the meat. It was delicious especially the bottoms.
    Eventually it was said to be the stuff that made people have heart attacks!

    Ironic isn't it! It was the white bread causing the metabolic syndrome and dripping was life saving
    D.
     
  14. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Women didn't generally have a full time job in the fifties they stayed home, looked after the kids and had the meal on the table when the bread winner came home.

    It's a changed world and will never come back.
    Any disobedience at school was immediately punished by caning.
    I was caned many times just for talking or not paying enough attention. Even by an RE teacher for getting below 7 out 10 for R.E!
    This particular vicar, he wore dog collar, was known as killer by us lads.

    How we can bring about social and dietary changes etc etc to drive us all in a utopian direction requires better minds and motivation than our current leaders of men and women possess.
    D.


     
  15. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Are you advocating corporal punishment as a cure for childhood obesity?
     
  16. Geordie_P

    Geordie_P Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The biggest culprit was something with zero calories, carbs or fat? I know you to be a good, knowledgeable poster, so I won't disagree per se, but it does sound quite anomalous. I also doubt that people switching from full-sugar to diet soda would be a major factor in the obesity crisis. I'm pretty sure, in fact, that drinking the same amount of very high-sugar drinks would lead to weight gain faster than drinking zero calorie drinks. Granted, I'm not suggesting such drinks are good for you, but I'm not sure zero carb, zero calorie drinks contribute to obesity more than, say, carbs, sugar, excessive intake of food etc.
     
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  17. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Well it happened to me. I was dieting for 20 or so years, counting calories, eating low fat. It wasn't until I had horrible pains in my jaw up to my temple that I (and my dentist) realised it was the artificial sweeteners causing it. Diet drinks have more chemicals in them than the ordinary ones and are more addictive. Yes I did eat some fast food occasionally, but that was always calorie counted too. It took years for my body to recover. Short term diet drinks help you consume less calories. But long-term they help you gain weight as your gut just doesn't work the same. Diet drinks contribute to fatty liver too and fatty liver brings with it insulin resitance..ie T2. Insulin resistance makes you … fat! I am not saying that a small amount of them occasionally is harmful but I really wish I had known then what I know now.

    But then again, if I hadn't had diet drinks to excess I doubt that I would have become T2, and without being T2 I wouldn't have met 2 or 3 people on this forum who have now become great friends. I wouldn't like to be without those guys in my life. :)

    Edit: I was talking about my own obesity. I know what I ate and drank.
     
    #17 zand, Nov 22, 2018 at 12:51 PM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
  18. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Hardly, if we cannot see how this country is completely different to what it was like 70 years ago one has their head in the sand.

    But if you want to make a joke about the changed nature of society; some good, some bad, you are speaking to the wrong man.

    The same methods that held the fabric of society together are no longer seen as relevelant. I am not sure we've found new ones to replace them.

    One in eight children apparently had mental health issues last year! Why?

    How are women and men going to find time to cook all the food from natural sources for their kids when the shops are full of carb cr*p.

    The mayor of London says it's going to take ten years to reduce knife crime which has rocketed since stop and search was limited.
    Why? Cos it did in Glasgow..purile answer.

    T2D is a societal problem like the full spectrum of problems we have as a society
    and we seem impotent to improve them. It even worse for the poor who increasingly are using food banks.
     
    #18 lindisfel, Nov 22, 2018 at 2:11 PM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2018
  19. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On the other hand the life expectancy for a man in England and Wales was 66 in 1948 and it is now 79 so not all bad.
     
  20. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Did I say it was all bad? I said some changes were good some bad.

    Obesity up, but life expectancy up, but it depends where we live and what social class we are from.
    Life expectancy according to some has stopped increasing.

    Science has advance medical procedures and society in general no longer smokes 50 a day, if one is male.
    Have you any idea what kind of life people dying in1948 at age 66 had?

    They suffered two world wars, Spanish flu, and extremely poor nutrition during the depression. I knew a man from the midlands had to eat raw turnips out the fields during the depression because he got so hungry.
    Add to that that, when they worked it was no sinicure.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
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