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Unexpected HBA1C check

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Barba_Rossa, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. Barba_Rossa

    Barba_Rossa Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have increased my healthy fat intake - more avocado, salmon, eggs, cheese - but not sure I would describe it as “high”. I did find in the second week that I was eating a lot of protein and veg but not much fat. Adding in the fats described above not only helped with feeling more satisfied, it also opened up alternatives in the kitchen and stopped boredom becoming a negative factor.
     
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  2. Barba_Rossa

    Barba_Rossa Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    To be honest, I’m not sure the nurse I saw really listened to much of what I was saying. I said I had cut out most carbs from my diet and then the next minute she was talking about eating cakes and pastries. I was quite disappointed by the advice she was able to offer. Had I not found this forum and had to rely solely on the advice from the hospital team, I’d be very confused and not at all reassured.
     
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  3. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are right that both 'Low' and 'High' are relative terms and that what they mean in these Forums is different to what they mean in the mainstream medical/nutritional world and that is different from what they meant before the Second World War, or even back in the 1960s & 1070s.

    By 'High Fat' what (I believe) most of us mean is that you have reduced the Carb Portion of Calories in your meals. Hopefully to way less than the 40% to 60% in the 'outside world'. So you either go hungry, or you increase the calorie contribution from either Protein or from Fat or from both. So in this context 'High Fat' just means an increased calorie contribution from Fats compared to what you typically ate before.

    I notice that you said 'healthy fat'. Many of us (but not all) believe that 'traditional edible fat' is healthy and that there is doubt about those requiring an intensive industrial extraction. So I would say that Cream is healthy, but that Soya Oil, Rapeseed Oil and especially Cotton Seed Oil may well not be, despite them being polyunsaturated.
     
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    #23 ianf0ster, Sep 4, 2019 at 9:18 AM
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2019
  4. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Actually what constitutes a 'Low Carb' diet varies hugely, as I believe that it should.
    I encourage every Diabetic to 'eat to their Blood Glucose meter', only by having a meter and using it can they actually see the effect of each individual meal. This is different , even considerably so, for different people.

    My meter tells me that I can't handle root veg like Carrot, Turnip, Swede, Beetroot. Legumes (for me) have to be strictly limited, so that means that I am eating at the lower end of the 'Low Carb' spectrum - generally between 20gms and 50gms of carbs per day.
    But this is not the case for several others who don't get spiked Blood Glucose from eating those. So you will see that 'Low Carb' in some of the medical studies done could mean as high as 120gms of carbs per day.
    In some of the studies done deliberately to try to 'debunk' Low Carb they even use values of up to 200gms or more.
     
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  5. myracat

    myracat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hello
    I am interested to see that your nurse was talking about cakes and pastries as my OH has just come back with a high HBA1c and we was previously told to eat pies, pastry, pecan slices and the like
    KR
     
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