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Where have you had a hypo?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by anna29, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. anna29

    anna29 Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi All .

    I have heard that some people experience a 'hypo' in supermarkets :shock:
    Am wondering how and why this is ... ?

    Strangely my worst hypo's were in Halfords and Morrisons !!
    Bizarre how my own very worst hypo's were both in a supermarket and a huge halfords car parts store .
    It was after the hypo in the middle of Morrisons that made me get my 'diabetic' tattoo done!

    Please share where you have experienced a 'hypo' ...
    It would be both helpful and interesting to hear other members experiences.

    Thanks Anna.
     
  2. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Good question although I don't know the answer Anna, a possible explanation is the exercise involved.... especially if you leave the car at home and walk or cycle a fair distance, I've never ever needed assistance with a hypo but remember having a bad one in Morrison's a few years ago that came close.
     
  3. gemma486

    gemma486 · Active Member

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    Mine as usually in a supermarket I have no idea why I have even been to a cafe had a coffee and something to eat and still had a hypo by the time I got out its bizarre


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  4. Viking

    Viking · Active Member

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    Not long after I was first diagnosed with Type 2 I went to the local Asda. An hour before my BG was about 10. Suddenly, in the middle of an aisle I had the worst hypo ever. I went out like a light. Of course everyone thought I was drunk, except one chap who got me some coke. Luckily for me the First Aider was familiar with diabetes as one of the staff was diabetic and took me to the first aid room until I recovered. Not a nice feeling and nothing you can do about it, I think it is to do with the lights and the different temperatures in the aisles.

    I have picked up a bottle of coke or some fruit buns before now, in the Supermarket, to stop me having a bad hypo. I do take the empty packet to the checkout and pay for it though.
     
  5. Geocacher

    Geocacher · Well-Known Member

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    Not eating when I should and stress will tend to cause a hypo for me without fail. The fight or flight response is a difinite trigger. Bad combination really, especially in a world where eating on time and keeping calm can sometimes be difficult.

    Meetings and day trips are always a special challenge, given that they often run long and can be busy, disorganised, and tense and you never know just when you'll be fed and watered or what will be served. I plan my day so that I can have a snack before a long meeting and always take a few sugar sweets with me just in case. If I'm at a roadshow or day long seminar, I bring my own sugar free soda or water and enough portable food to make it through the day. I've had people make comments, like "they'll have lunch in half an hour can't you wait?" I'm more than happy to point out to them that sometimes people can't wait. And if someone has an issue with me eating in their auditorium or doing a blood test I'll happily step outside to take care of my needs. They're ignorance is not worth the risk of a hypo. That doesn't mean I won't stop and educate them on my way back in though.

    Grocery shopping when hungry is a real problem. If I must then I'll have a sensible snack before I shop just to be safe. I suspect that same instinct that makes normal people buy more when they are hungry can cause low blood sugar for those of us who tend to have hypos.

    I've long been in the habit of carrying granola bars or breakfast bars, and glucose tablets in my rucksack just in case. And I always have a meter with me. Better they are handy and not needed than needed and not handy, especially when I'm off wandering about in the countryside miles from anywhere. More than once I've handed out glucose tablets or a snack to someone else who was having a hypo.
     
  6. picklebean

    picklebean Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I usually have them at home, but that might be because I don't often leave the house. :roll:

    Other places I've had them are while out shopping on the highstreet, getting blood taken for my biannual clinic appointment and once during a therapy session (my therapist wondered what on earth was going on!!) :lol:
     
  7. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Many, many years ago ... John Lewis.

    My mum was with me and I'd said to her I wasnt right and had glucotabs from bag.
    Mum knew I was sliding further down and asked assistant for milk n sugar, as she knew this was my favourite hypo stopper.
    Was ok, but the lovely staff in John Lewis told me and mum to go up to restaurant and have a free meal and coffee for both of us!!!
    John Lewis deserves 3 cheers for the help they gave me.
     
  8. desidiabulum

    desidiabulum · Well-Known Member

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    Exciting/embarrassing ones:
    During a concert performance
    Doing a TV interview
    Giving a lecture
    Crossing the street

    Boring ones:
    Supermarket
    Gardening
    Simply sitting down at the computer

    I now mostly manage to avoid them -- the meds and diet balance seems to be right (for the time being -- touch wood)
     
  9. blueeyed81

    blueeyed81 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ive had hypos out n bout but the funniest one has to be whilst I was staying at a good friends house and was told once I'd come round that I went to have a ciggy and her pet dog at the time was outside too and I was having a conversation with the dog and tried lighting the dog a ciggy and lighting mine with something other than a lighter, once my friend got me inside (after trying for ages apparently lol) I was then fed spoons n spoons of sugar till I was back to normal (if you can call me normal that is) lol

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  10. Thundercat

    Thundercat · Well-Known Member

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    I once jad a really bad hypo while in my gp's waiting room. I took a whole packet of Lucozade sweets and bs wouldn't come up. My partner was with me so he ran next door to shop for bottle of Lucozade. Ended up drinking all of it and still hypoing amd getting worse so he went to reception to have doctor notified. Dr gave me Glucagon injection and still hypoing. Doctor started to panic (very reassuring!) and eventually called am ambulance. I didn't lose consciousness but was low enough not to remember the journey. Another Glucagon shot and soon after bs started to rise. They checked again after 1 hour and I was at 14ish so went home. Later that night bs at 38. No idea to this day what happened and doctors couldn't explain.

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  11. anna29

    anna29 Type 2 · Well-Known Member
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    Hi All .

    Thanks for you replies - have found ' all ' this very interesting and enlightening.
    When I go to certain supermarkets or large stores I can 'soon' start to feel light headed
    and bit dizzy n giddy both in sense and balance [ head,walk,gait ] .
    A bit like when you go out to a party, pub , and have a bit too much to drink !
    Obviously during this I am just a normal mrs joe bloggs, sober as a judge, just out
    in a supermarket doing a bit of shopping !!!
    It 'IS' strange and baffles me everytime ... :crazy:

    I have often stopped n tested leaning over the trolley after rummaging about in handbag
    for my test kit.
    Am 'always' a lot lower than when have left home ... :eek:
    Activity after doing my insulin I have always thought ?
    Always made sure have eaten enough to compensate for both insulin and activity done !
    To cover myself and prevent going too low into a hypo .

    Yet - I still find in a large supermarket I just go a lot lower 'quickly' anyways .
    [have even tried reducing my insulin pre-shopping , to see if it would make a difference !
    No not a jot of difference I have to say :shock:
    Still feel bit drunk n whoozy headed as I potter around getting few bits n bobs ...

    Have wondered how and why this is so ????
    Lights in the store's ? Echoey tannoy and sounds ? Enviroment being larger, busy and noisy
    whilst I shop ?

    Find I have to read things twice over to focus - due to oddness of whoosy feeling's in my head
    and sensation of quite being light headed or dizzy .

    Feel quite amazed to hear of 'how' many people have their hypo's whilst out shopping or browsing in a store .
    More having them whilst out and about than the very few having a hypo whilst at home indoors ...
    Surely there must be an answer as to 'why' this is .
    Unless the activity is the obvious key answer!

    Anna.
     
  12. Geocacher

    Geocacher · Well-Known Member

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    The mind is a peculiar place at best and I suspect that vestigal instinct from our hunter/gatherer past is probably much to blame for reactions in the presence of food that we cannot otherwise explain.

    I find that I rarely have hypos when I'm shopping for shoes or clothes and yet the amount of physical activity is similar. I think that the presence of all the food in the gorcery store causes the body to believe that it will soon be fed and so it tries to trigger a normal response to prepare for the consumption of food, and when it isn't fed a hypo happens because a diabetic body cannot respond in a normal way.
     
  13. blueeyed81

    blueeyed81 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Geo omg that makes so much sense lol although I hypo what ever im shoppin for lol
     
  14. xAoifex

    xAoifex Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The bath! More than once...
     
  15. carandol

    carandol Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In "Think Like a Pancreas", the author Gary Scheiner reckons people have hypos in supermarkets because your brain is getting a lot more stimulation than in everyday life (lots of things going on around you, lots of products to look at, lots of decisions to be made about what to buy, etc.). Since the brain needs a lot of glucose to work, you're more likely to have a hypo when its working overtime.
     
  16. ianml

    ianml · Member

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    Hi all,
    Forgive me I am very new in this complex condition i have been recently diagnosed with type 2 my Habc1 was 6.9.
    I want to ask what is Hypo nobody has explained this to me, am I expecting one of these???
    hope you are all well
     
  17. pav

    pav Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A hypo is where your blood sugar goes to low, as described here http://www.diabetes.co.uk/what-is-a-hypo.html

    There is also the opposite where your blood sugar goes to high http://www.diabetes.co.uk/Diabetes-and- ... aemia.html

    If you are likely to get a hypo this can depend on what meds you are on, if using metformin or diet alone, you would not normally experience a hypo as metformin is not like other meds.

    If you are on insulin or meds like gliclazide these can cause you to go hypo.
     
  18. sharonValerie

    sharonValerie · Active Member

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    I've had hypo's in supermarkets, what used to set me off was the ulra violet lights, I still won't go into the refrigerator parts in Macro as they still effect me. Also had a coma at the hospital just before appointment with consultant and had another in carpark just after a visit with the consultant. Ended up in casualty then. Not funny. :roll:
     
  19. andylinley

    andylinley · Newbie

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    Generally my hypos come on around 2pm on a Sunday if I've had a drinking session on a Friday night and a Saturday night and I've been out shopping on a Sunday morning. Been as low as 1.5 and wondered how I've still been wandering about- must be the BG meter I think, but jam on toast does the trick. The worst time was out on a bike ride with my mate on a canal in the middle of nowhere; fortunately he'd listened to the advice I'd given as to where my glucogel was and to rub it into my gums- just wish he'd washed his hands first. lol.
     
  20. BADEST WOLF

    BADEST WOLF · Member

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    At age 14 I had 1 hypo whilst walking into town. My legs gave way and I fell flat on my face. Stil got the scar on my chin. Lucky for me several us army personnel where just leaving a hotel where I collapsed. They recognised my. SOS TALISMAN opened it and found I was diabetic they took me into the hotel ordered the staff to give me coke & called my mum. Ended up at. A&E for my cut chin but alright on the end thanks to the US ARMY. !!


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