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Which pump do you have?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by TypeZero., Jul 14, 2020.

  1. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    In the process of getting a pump and I know every CCG is different but which pumps do you guys have?

    I’ve looked online about the pumps NHS offers but the pumps they claim to offer e.g. Cellnovo are no longer manufactured so the list they have must be old.
     
  2. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My hospital has the Accu-check Insight - that's the only choice unless you have a very specific reason for needing one with sensors (and that does not include the reason of 'it'll be easier') in which case you get one of the Medtronics, though not sure which.
     
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  3. In Response

    In Response · Well-Known Member

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    AS others have said on this forum - ask your consultant/DSN/diabetes team what pumps they have on offer.
    My local CCG only offers one pump so there is no value researching or getting information about any other pump. You are only setting yourself up for disappointment.
    Furthermore, the choice of pumps on offer is changing and, from my understanding from your other posts, you have not had confirmation about a pump so things may change.

    Be nice to yourself. Master the art of managing diabetes through injections. Be grateful you were diagnosed when MDI and Libre is available and worry about a pump when you have the chance. Learn to managing your life with diabetes not let diabetes manage your life.

    Please consider there are people on this forum who have had diabetes for more than 10 or 20 years and have spent many of them waiting and begging for any pump. To some of them, your posts about a pump after three months may seem insensitive.
     
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    #3 In Response, Jul 14, 2020 at 8:34 AM
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2020
  4. DunePlodder

    DunePlodder Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  5. eventhorizon

    eventhorizon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Medtronic 640g for 18 months now. It's the only pump I've had so nothing to compare with but I love it. I can't see myself wanting to go back to MDI anytime soon.
    Be kind to yourself, jump the NHS hoops get a pump and master it. It's not easy to obtain or use but well well worth it.
     
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  6. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Me too.
     
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  7. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    I don’t understand what is insensitive about wanting technology that can help manage your medical condition. There is a certain criteria and I don’t influence how it is enforced. I understand many of the technologies were not available years ago but wouldn’t they have wanted these technologies if it were available in their time? Some people are excellent at managing their diabetes with MDI and glucose meters and that’s alright but there are other people who can’t. 51 hypos in 49 days of Libre isn’t a nice sight especially when you do your best in reducing basal and bolusing differently to reduce hypos and especially since it’s worrying when you have partially lost hypo awareness— practically don’t feel it most times. I was recommended a pump by my endo and although nothing is confirmed yet I don’t think he would’ve mentioned it if he didn’t see a clinical need.

    I do understand the frustration some people may feel though. I sympathise with them because they can’t get the care they want but there is a universal criteria so we are technically all having an equal access to whatever we want provided we meet the criteria. I am always prepared for disappointment, I don’t expect much since NHS only offers a very basic level of care. Right now in my head I’m thinking “a pump would be great but if I’m rejected then it’s not that deep”.
     
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  8. Rokaab

    Rokaab Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately this just isn't the case though :(
    I was fighting for a number of years to get a pump, with no luck, then the consultant I was seeing retired and I got a new one (same hospital clinic) last year who looked at all the info and said 'oh yes, you should definitely have one' and I got approved (still not started mind)
    And even then since the availability of pumps is very limited in some cases, some get pumps definitely more suited to them than others.
    So its more that some of us have been fighting for years to get the tech whereas others just seem to get it handed out within a blink - which as you can imagine can be very frustrating.
     
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  9. TypeZero.

    TypeZero. · Well-Known Member

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    That is disappointing to hear. I do understand that you have been diagnosed for a very long time. Did you request for a pump before the NICE criteria was set (not sure but somewhere around 2008 I believe?) before the criteria was set there was inequality across the UK as different CCGs had different priorities.

    I know someone who was 3 years old when diagnosed and the mother said that the endo practically begged them to take a pump. I think you had an unfortunate case of having an endo that didn’t really care about your treatment, it’s so sad to hear they denied you your pump, every time I read about the damage high BG does to your body I wonder why they won’t offer the necessary help to people but I know funding is not unlimited.

    The system is frustrating. You could be waiting 10 years for a pump and then they would only have only 1 pump which doesn’t have the features you desire
     
  10. In Response

    In Response · Well-Known Member

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    The NICE recommendations for children is different to the recommendation for adults.
    That is on top of the postcode/endo lottery many of us have to endure.

    It is great that your endo has already mentioned pumps to you but be aware that this is not common. Many of us have not been so lucky.
     
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  11. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Availability of technology for minors is very much a whole different ball game to adult care.

    That "somebody got", or someone "had it pressed upon them" is anecdotal, and could reflect that individual, and their unique circumstances, but remember, there is nothing guaranteed in diabetes care, except that nothing is guaranteed - even fron one clinic visit to another.

    I appreciate it is supremely frustrating, but it is what it is.
     
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  12. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    We should not be beating each other up because some may have access that others don't have, should we stop this forum because it might upset others who are unable to obtain a pump. @TypeZero. carry on asking questions otherwise you will never get the answers you need. I'm glad when I first asked questions I was not approached like you have been.
     
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  13. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    I use an Omnipod (that I’ve sort of hacked a bit and now it talks to my Dexcom CGM to creat a DIY artificial pancreas) - my clinic also offers a Medtronic ?640G - maybe the 670 too, but I’m not sure. Omnipod was always going to be the only option foe me, as I can’t do tubes in my job. I’m unusual in that onvery I decided I wanted to have a pump, it was attached and running nine days later. I had excellent control on injections and an HbA1c of 42 at the time, but it took up to 18 injections a day to achieve it. I’d been injecting for 19 years, but never wanted a pump until I got a Libre and could see just how all over the place my levels were most of the time.
     
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  14. Gaz-M

    Gaz-M Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    minimed 670g with Guardian sensors
     
  15. Fazzy

    Fazzy · Newbie

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    I use an Omnipod pump and find it super easy to use. I had good control on injections but use to skip meals all the time as I hated injecting and was very underweight. The pump has really helped me manage my diabetes and am on track gaining the kilos I needed.
     
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  16. LizLola

    LizLola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm on a 640G with Guardian sensors. I've always had hard-to-control diabetes, and was on a pump in the early 80s because of this. It was ghastly. But they were around long ago. I was 'pressed' to have another pump for a long time by my consultant, so non-anecdotal evidence here. My first was the Minimed 570. Then the Deltec Cozmo which was a fabulous pump and much better than the following Minimed. When I got a Veo, my consultant pressed to get me to use sensors and I was very reluctant as they were not very accurate and they were very new at the time. They also offered me a transplant, but I joined an FB transplant group and know very well now that a transplant is not all it's cracked up to be - immune suppressing drugs are like having chemo all the time, very destructive and they put you at risk of all kinds of weird infections. So I got an assistance dog, that was 11 years ago and she is great. However, the sensors eventually had to be taken up as she does sleep and after two very long 3 hour hypos I was thought to be at risk. I am presuming that this is all based on need. I continually thank goodness that I have that funding. It seems most unfair that others don't. I think that you should read all you can about the types of pump on offer to you and ask on here (if brave enough to do so after comment above!) to ask users of those pumps/that pump how they find it. I do hope you find something that helps you and that you are happy with.
     
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