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Why Do Diabetics Fail To Adhere To Dietary Regimes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by datkins65, Aug 1, 2016.

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Why do the majority of diabetic patients fail to follow their dietary regimens? Primary reason.

  1. Socioeconomic; lack of funds to purchase healthy choices

  2. Lack of education or knowledge about diabetes

  3. Fresh vegetables and healthy food is not available.

  4. Depression or mental health issues

  5. Does not understand about the progression of diabetes if not managed.

  6. Not willing to change or not ready to make a change.

  7. Advanced age; in denial that dietary changes can make a difference.

  8. Youth: The idea that they are invincible to these problems & unwilling to give up fast foods.

  9. The prescribed diet was not effective.

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Lizzie2

    Lizzie2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Exactly! The foods I was advised to eat - the 'healthy plate' with carbs with every meal would have been a disaster for me. As it was I had read about eating your way out of T2, I bought a blood sugar meter, Reverse your T2 Diabetes by Dr David Cavan, discovered this site and LCHF and in the process discovered that it was exactly the 'healthy' stuff on the 'healthy plate' pyramid that was causing the spikes in my blood sugar.

    I recorded everything I ate and eliminated the foods that spiked my blood mostly the foods that I was advised to eat most of, once I did that I lost weight - an unexpected but added bonus believe me - and my HbA1c is now below pre diabetes level.

    In my case I really don't feel I was at all well advised. For a start I wasn't given a blood sugar meter, I was told 'my diet sounded alright ( so alright I was classed as - but not told I was! - pre diabetic. I was toldto stick to not more than one banana a day and to avoid pineapples and grapes and come back in three months' time. When I asked what would happen if diet and exercise didn't work I was told I'd be put on the diabetic register.

    OK blood sugar meters cost money - but surely if they can get people to keep be really aware of what is going on and keep their blood sugar as low as they can it will cost the NHS less in the long run.

    I really don't think a lot of people - especially the ones who don't use this site - can be aware of the progressive consequences of T2, metformin and then insulin.
     
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  2. almedabr

    almedabr Type 2 · Newbie

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    I am confused, you stop taking Metformin, because of wanting to continue weight loss, and then re-started it again, when desired weight loss was attained. My doctor said...Metformin has nothing to do with weight loss/gain.
     
  3. almedabr

    almedabr Type 2 · Newbie

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    Oh dear, here we go again, I personally know of 6 people who have diabetes 2.....and they are not overweight but bordering more on being too thin. I was within an acceptable weight when I became diabetic, and now have ballooned. I am convinced that in some older people especially, fibromyalgia, arthritis, general inflammation throughout the body, insomnia, and other, can be interlinked with diabetes 2.....and can be contributory to higher glucose readings. I have much difficulty in controlling my blood sugars even though I try very hard in restricting carb intake, and try to exercise.
     
  4. Samael_Coughlan

    Samael_Coughlan Type 1 · Member

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    Mental health becomes a huge part for me. That and, even after getting an insulin pump in and getting my thyroid out, my medications work against me every step of the way still. Thyroxine drives them up, antipsychotics tend to drive them down. I tend to need to be a bit more reactive with those circumstances. That and sometimes when some of my schizophrenic symptoms get annoying I use exercise, especially swimming, to manage them which throws more spanners in the work.
     
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  5. Grungysquash

    Grungysquash Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The problem is simple - it doesn't kill u quickly like cancer - so people start with the best intentions then phase out after a month or two.

    Hell I was diagnosed in Feb this year - HbA1c inital was 11.3 - first blood test was fasting 17.3.

    Fast Forward 7 months - HbA1c now 5.7 - how was this achieved - diet and exercise. I'm 47 weighted 115kg height 185cm - was never sick didn't even know I has this disease - now 98kg - so 17kg lost, BG in good control.

    People decide to do lots of unhealthy things - make excuses because it's hard. Like to complain about their lot in life.

    It's not been easy for me - hell no I bloody well dislike riding my bike at 6am in the cold to work - I could easily take the car - it's a mindset - u must decide to do something, but it's easier to make excuses and do nothing.
     
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  6. fene48

    fene48 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad and I have plenty more. I attribute it to being a cynical, warped and twisted old b...
    I can't take credit for the age - but the rest is all my hard work.
     
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  7. fene48

    fene48 · Well-Known Member

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    Impressive results and well done. Its easy to stand on the sideline and cheer for someone who does well and is not a victim in his mind. I am waaaay head of you mate. I'm 69 and still putting the left foot in front of the right on a fairly regular basis. Been a Type 2 since 2010, unfortunately I am not the sharpest tool in the shed and took me a while to wake up. Once I got on way the results kept coming.
    Just a word of caution - make sure you have a good sustainable eating plan when you have reached your objective. Although if I were a betting man I would put a bundle on you.
    Keep at it and the best of luck champ.
     
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  8. DaftThoughts

    DaftThoughts LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I have had weight gain, but I attribute this in part to being LADA and having a very irregular output of insulin as it is. Gliclazide helps to lower glucose but sometimes it causes too much insulin production and I have to eat quite a bit to stay above 6.0. Naturally that leads to weight gain.

    I'll be asking to take off the gliclazide and switch to bolus instead for better results because of this.
     
  9. KurtK

    KurtK Don't have diabetes · Newbie

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    Here where I live (and I think it is the same in UK/USA..etc) they recommend avoiding fat for people with T2. Ok I know now its total ****, but I just want to know why the hell are they recommending that? Whats the story behind "fat makes T2 worse" ???
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    but don't you find most (not all) DSN's and Dr's do talk to you like that !!!! mine do .. but I still used to blindly follow their advice .. thankfully the wife just sees them as people.. and ignores any advice or orders they give.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. DavidGrahamJones

    DavidGrahamJones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for slow reply. It's been several years since I paid for this test and it was about £90 at the time. I had been having an ongoing ding dong with my doctor at the time and I wanted to know what state my pancreas was in, hence the c-peptide test. I can only tell you what's in Google.

    C-peptide is released from the pancreatic beta-cells during cleavage of insulin from proinsulin. It is mainly excreted by the kidney, and its half-life is 3-4 times longer than that of insulin. The reference range of C-peptide is 0.8-3.1 ng/mL (conventional units), or 0.26-1.03 nmol/L (SI).

    So, although it's not measuring insulin, the two are so closely related that it's a reliable measure of insulin production. BTW diabetes.co.uk say the normal range is 0.51 to 2.72 nanograms per millilitre as opposed to the 0.8 to 3.1 mentioned above.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  12. LucySW

    LucySW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In answer to the original thread title, Not all do.

    But when I do deviate, slightly, from my own self-set plan, it's because of tiredness or fatigue, and exasperation and impatience.
     
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  13. LezLezLez

    LezLezLez Type 2 · Member

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    My input is this (and I am a T2 aged 71) - I understand that T2 is not advisable, but I have only altered my desirability of diet choices after suffering myself a potentially very damaging nerve palsy which if it had continued, would have caused me to have to stop driving. In other words my poor adherence to a T2 diet has been that my personal choice says I still like "ordinary" foods in preference to T2 diet foods. My conclusion for me is that the industry (for who else is there) needs to find a way of causing me to alter my priorities e.g. less pleasurable eating, less risk of bodily damage. In fact I am continuing to eat some pleasurable foods, but trying to lose weight using the 5/2 fasting approach diet, which I plan to shortly extend to 4/3 !
     
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  14. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have had type 1 for 55 years in Feb 2017 (no complications). My motivation for sticking to that same diet for all those years is because it makes me feel good. If blood sugar is anything over 7 I feel absolutely awful--I need lots of energy to be able to do everything I want and need to do & would hate to be the way I was when diagnosed at aged 8 years--I will do anything to ensure that I keep bms within normal range....!!!
     
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  15. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh lovely--when I saw a dietician she didn;t even know how much bread contained 10g cho!!!!!!!
     
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  16. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ...I had to tell her!!
     
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  17. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    --do 30/ 30/ 30 g cho + 10-15g cho before bed (to stop nocturnal hypo). Aim for bm 4-7.
     
  18. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It really helps to know how much cho foods contain, to have a set amount for each meal and to stick to that amount of cho at mealtimes but vary the types of food eaten (easy if you know cho content of foods). I was diagnosed at 8 years and whilst in hospital was taught cho content of different foods. It was also thought that if a child thinks they cannot eat sweets and chocolate they are more likely to want it, eat it secretly and even binge therefore I was encouraged to exchange, for example, to exchange an apple for 2 squares of Cadburys choc which contained the same cho. This was so sensible and made me realise that I could work treats into my diet providing they contained the correct cho. I can remember my mother preparing me to go to a childrens party: she buzz tested me daily for a couple of weeks on cho contents of foods that might be at the party. I was allowed 50g cho at teatime so could eat a sandwich (round of thin bread was 30g cho) and then have a chocolate marshmallow (15g cho-probably different now) and I still had 5g left for 1/2 a biscuit or 1/2 a desert spoon of vanilla ice cream (cho contents again probably vary now)! You have no idea how confident I felt after having met the challange and my wee test was 0% sugar before bed too--no blood tests then but a test tube in which I put 5 drops of wee, 10 of water (if I remember correctly & then a tablet--like the fehlings test for sugar content of potato in secondary science). I now realise how good my mother was--not to mention brave!! I have now had diabetes for 55 years in Feb 2017. I eat less cho now (30/ 30/ 30 + 15g before bed to stop nocturnal hypos) and have no complications. My motivation is to have plenty of energy--a bm of over 7 depletes my energy severely!!!!! As well as the correct cho amount I have salad or veg and protein at each meal. I always prepare my own lunchtime food to take with me to work. I exercise a lot (I trained and worked as a professional dancer when younger). I work as a teacher and during the school holidays I organise & deliver youth activities on board cruise ships. Key to a balanced diet (imperative for anyone with diabetes) is to know cho contents of foods--I balance my food with the amount of insulin I take.
     
  19. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ....yes not specific enough.....
     
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  20. prancer53

    prancer53 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ...and type 1 even worse--totally unable to metabolise cho without the correct amount of insulin
     
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