1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Why Do Diabetics Fail To Adhere To Dietary Regimes?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by datkins65, Aug 1, 2016.

?

Why do the majority of diabetic patients fail to follow their dietary regimens? Primary reason.

  1. Socioeconomic; lack of funds to purchase healthy choices

  2. Lack of education or knowledge about diabetes

  3. Fresh vegetables and healthy food is not available.

  4. Depression or mental health issues

  5. Does not understand about the progression of diabetes if not managed.

  6. Not willing to change or not ready to make a change.

  7. Advanced age; in denial that dietary changes can make a difference.

  8. Youth: The idea that they are invincible to these problems & unwilling to give up fast foods.

  9. The prescribed diet was not effective.

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. DaftThoughts

    DaftThoughts LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    613
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I lost my best friend to sudden death in 2010. He was healthy and had no conditions, 24 years old, autopsy showed nothing - it was just lights out. My diet was **** as depression hit me full force, and I got my prediabetic warnings in 2012 when I was hospitalized for something unrelated and had a high fasting value. Maybe that event was what triggered the onset of my diabetes? I was 22 at the time of his death and got the official LADA label in 2014 at 26.

    It's interesting to hear from so many people that their diagnosis was preceeded by some sort of traumatic experience. Correlation doesn't have to be causation of course. I wonder if there are any studies done on this?
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

    Messages:
    12,538
    Likes Received:
    15,649
    Trophy Points:
    298
    During my time on here and reading many papers on the cause of conditions such as diabetes. It regularly comes up. They use to have a label for it.
    A lot of other conditions are caused or triggered by trauma.
    It is not that uncommon.
    I would believe that one of the many questions asked by endocrinologists is have you had any trauma.
    My endocrinologist was wary of my diagnosis because I had no trauma that I was aware of!
     
  3. busydiabeticmum

    busydiabeticmum I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    721
    Trophy Points:
    153
    As you can see from my pic thing (dont know what you call them) i had this as a trauma... i developed fybromyalgia too, he was so seriously ill... he has recovered but i still have the nightmares... my diabetes came about after i was being put on medications to rule out fibromyalgia (which didnt) and then an asthma attack... not sure if the trauma had anything to do with it... As for my husbands cousin his type 1 was instant, but then the shock was extreme and brutal!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. psignathus

    psignathus Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    202
    Trophy Points:
    83
    This questionnaire is truly appalling and will get a huge fail due to its judgmental nature:-

    Socioeconomic; lack of funds to purchase healthy choices.....assumes healthy choices are expensive.
    Lack of education or knowledge about diabetes...........assumes the diabetic is lacking in intelligence.
    Fresh vegetables and healthy food is not available....assumes 'fresh' food is a potential cure and does not define healthy.
    Depression or mental health issues...............assumes depressed or those with mental health issues cannot control diabetes.
    Does not understand about the progression of diabetes if not managed...assumes the diabetic is lacking in intelligence
    Not willing to change or not ready to make a change.assumes the diabetic has done something wrong leading to diabetic diagnosis.
    Advanced age; in denial that dietary changes can make a difference...assumes older people cannot change direction in thinking.
    Youth: The idea that they are invincible to these problems & unwilling to give up fast foods..assumes young people with diabetes got there by eating fast food.
    The prescribed diet was not effective...assumes the diabetic is prescribed a diet of some sort by whom we do not know.


    These questions are leading questions and as such are not suitable for a questionnaire study. I would start again once this thread has been thoroughly read to take on board the very fair critique. In my opinion!



     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  5. fene48

    fene48 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    136
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I think you can place any interpretation on these questions as you wish. It depends on the assumptions one wishes to make.
     
  6. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

    Messages:
    11,313
    Likes Received:
    22,363
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I don't follow a regime but I do have a regimen that is a set of rules about food and exercise that someone follows, especially in order to improve their health, but I decided for my self what that should be rather than be regimented by some so called authority.
     
  7. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,395
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The ASSUMPTION has always been that people FAILS to adhere and comply...rather than consider that even those that regimentally follow the suggested diets and exercise regimes, results are generally mediocre, few ever return to normal HbA1c of < 5.5%

    Spend some time on the thread for success stories and perhaps focus on gleaning what had worked for them...
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/success-stories-and-testimonials.43/
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Daphne917

    Daphne917 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,134
    Likes Received:
    7,870
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I failed to adhere and comply because I listened to the 'experts', found it wasn't working, did my own research and decided which diet and way of life was best for me as an individual. I also researched the side effects of the statins that I was prescribed 'because all diabetics should be on them' and found that they were part of problem as they increased my hba1c so made a decision, with my doctor's consent, to stop them. My hba1c is now within the normal range.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. nickm

    nickm Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Why can diabetes educators not point to a single Type 1 my age who complies with official diet guidelines and is as successful as many who don't?
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  10. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    2,602
    Likes Received:
    4,616
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Think the original poster has not returned to this thread for quite some time ..
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  11. Brewers23

    Brewers23 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    45
    Trophy Points:
    78
    It should not be why do diabetics not comply or adhere to the advice given as this is an outdated healthcare professional knows best attitude; the management of all long term conditions is one of a relationship between HCP and patient that is concordant. Thus there should be an agreement between the HCP and patient for the management of the condition and should be individualised, the patient is then activated resulting in less hospital admissions, attendances at A&E and increased medication adherence (Kinney et al 2015); this is particularly true for those who are newly diagnosed.

    Statins can increase blood sugar levels in patients who are susceptible to diabetes and can worsen the condition (Ohmura et al 2005). It is postulated that this is because statins reduce insulin secretion at the same time as reducing insulin sensitivity (Aiman, Najmi, Khan 2014).

    REFERENCES
    Aiman U., Najmi A., Khan R.A. (2014),’Statin induced diabetes and its clinical implications’, Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics, 5, 3, pp 181- 185

    Kinney R.L., Lemon S.C., Person S.D., Pagoto S.L., Saczynski J.S. (2015), ‘The association between patient activation and medication adherence, hospitalization, and emergency room utilization in patients with chronic illnesses: A systematic review’, Patient Education and Counseling, 98, pp 545–552

    Ohmura C., Watada H., Hirose T., Tanaka Y., Kawamori R. (2005),’ Acute onset and worsening diabetes concurrent with administration of statins’, Endocrine Journal, 52,3,pp369-372
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  12. _lyn_lyn_1963

    _lyn_lyn_1963 · Guest

    I developed my own and it worked, I have never been over weight but nearly got pre diabetis as levels were up. I follow my own instincts and lucky for me I was right, think folks don't like being told what to do especially when it's a load of old **** advice that doesn't work like the low fat, calorie restriction thing that's still being pushed around today by weight watchers and slimming world.
     
  13. _lyn_lyn_1963

    _lyn_lyn_1963 · Guest

    They are **** ideas that don't work for people and we figure our own way much better, anymore questions.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  14. srm100841

    srm100841 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    28
     
  15. srm100841

    srm100841 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    20
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I can understand why you've been given a pretty hard ride on this thread since my experience is that qualified dieticians can actually cause harm. For 5 years after my diagnosis (T2), I strictly adhered to the advice of my dietician and during this period my BG levels rose from about 8 to 13. I subsequently discovered this forum and switched to a LCHF diet and my levels reduced to yearly averages ranging from 5.8 to 6.26. For the last 2 years I have not had a reading above 7 and this year not above 6.

    It seems to me that the teaching given to researchers and dieticians needs to be updated in the light of the weight of evidence supporting LCHF. The other point to make is that 'one size does not necessarily fit all'.
     
  16. rachaelc

    rachaelc Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    32
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Totally agree, current medical opinion is only just beginning to take Low GI seriously. I even discussed it with a practice dietician, who poopood my opinion said it's ONLY Canada and Australia that do low GI. Thankfully this forum sees things differently.
     
  17. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

    Messages:
    12,538
    Likes Received:
    15,649
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I think that I've already mentioned that to a lot of diabetics, that are susceptible to spikes because of low GI foods. To some carbs are carbs no matter the label.
    Low GI has been around since the turn of the century, but more research has been done, it's a pity it wasn't done with diabetics in mind!
    We see it different because it works, if you can get your personal lifestyle choices to what you want to achieve.
     
  18. Humma

    Humma Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Some do and there the ones who get severe complications and wonder why it happens to them
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. robertconroy

    robertconroy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    108
    Trophy Points:
    83
    This is interesting as I'm a yank and it sounds like diabetics in the UK are in the dark as much as the US diabetics. Type 2 diabetes is caused by too high of insulin levels, which the cells know too much insulin is toxic. The cells shut down the door that lets insulin into the cells. This is called insulin resistance. Were all insulin resistant (T2) that's how we got diabetes. Diabetes is just when your blood sugar reaches a predetermined number, you are officially diabetic. Stress, drugs (like cholesterol drugs), and high glycemic carbohydrates raises blood sugar, so your body tries to produce more insulin to get your blood sugar into the cells. Most all diabetes drugs lower blood sugar by raising insulin. Catch 22, higher insulin creates worse insulin resistance, so you need more drugs, more powerful drugs. High blood sugar and high insulin are the cause of most all chronic disease - obesity, T 2 diabetes, heart attack, stroke, cancer, inflammatory diseases, dementia, and especially Altzheimer's.
    Over 50% of T 2s will get early dementia and 70% will die of heart attack. The best treatment is not drugs, it's diet and exercise to reduce insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is what's causing all this. Exercise, makes your body more sensitive to insulin and burns some glucose. Carbs from different foods raise blood sugar differently. You need to learn the bad carbs to avoid. That's what glycemic load is all about. Get a smartphone app on glycemic load of foods, or get a little book on glycemic load. Learn what to eat and what not too.
    Worst foods:
    All grains, dried fruit, puffed rice especially, all starchy veggies like potatoes, all sugars. Fresh fruit are ok in reasonable serving size. No fresh fruits are high glycemic load.
    Things that lower blood sugar: alcohol, vinegar, cinnamon, and citric acid. I stopped all grains and lost 24 lbs in 28 days. Grains have the highest correlation with all chronic diseases mentioned above. Yes, I am a real nutritionist treating most all chronic diseases.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  20. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,016
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Trophy Points:
    158
    For me I have found this to be very true. Any grains, brown or white, whole grain or not gets me to spike over a 9 and I don't come back down for three hours to 6's. I can have a small amount of potatoes or even carrots and don't rise over 8.
    But time and time again from various medical professionals I've been told I must include them for brain function.
    If I had followed this advice I'd be on two different medications for BS, one for high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and another for depression by now.
    For me lowcarb with a emphasis on no grains has saved my life. And that's why I don't adhear to any dietary advice!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    #220 Hotpepper20000, Sep 30, 2016 at 3:29 AM
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2016
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook