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Wondering about moving from oral meds to injections

Discussion in 'Type 2 with Insulin' started by PurpleDragon, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    I was diagnosed about 5 years ago but the doc said I had probably been Type2 for quite a lot of years without knowing it. It certainly explained a lot!

    I am on oral meds but my blood sugar is gradually rising and although I low carb and have since I was diagnosed, it seems to be not working so well as it was. Before my next 3 month check up I have to go get a blood test and I am pretty sure it will show that my BS levels are unacceptable. I was warned at the beginning of this that there might come a time when I would need insulin injections.

    Now, I basically understand what the procedure is with injections, and I can't say I am worried about it all, it just seem like the next progression along this journey. What I am after are opinions please.

    Who here can tell me if you:
    1 Were you worried about changing?
    2 Did you find it easy?
    3 Most important of all for me...are there good things about this change? E.g. More energy, less lethargy etc.

    So, good and bad please if you wouldn't mind

    Thanks so much
     
  2. bigjohn9916

    bigjohn9916 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been on insulin since diagnosed T2 in August. And had probably been diabetic since 2000 when I had all the symptoms but was told It was my age and I smoked and was overweight.
    Now that I've worked out how much insulin is required for all my favorite foods, I can eat what I like, within reason. I find I can keep my Blood Glucose within the same limits as someone without diabetes.
    I am now no longer tired all the time. and I seem less irritable, that's despite also giving up smoking.
    Injecting is very easy, and with 4mm long needles I don't even feel it. Just takes a couple of minutes morning and evening, and a pen of insulin lasts me about 10 days and as they come in packs of 5, I will only need to go to the surgery every couple of months to get a repeat prescription.
    I haven't come across any problems with injecting, although from reading this Forum it seems a lot of people have problems with oral medication.
    I would say if you do go on insulin, let yourself go hypo just once so you know what it feels like. And carry some jelly babies just in case you are forced to miss a meal.
     
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  3. martinsk8r

    martinsk8r Type 2 · Member

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    Hi,
    1. I pleaded to go on injections so I could stop Glicklazide (hated it, probably can't even spell it)
    2. Very easy, but I did increase the dose too fast. 6 units, 8 , 10, 12. that was 2 days and I should have given it a few days between increases and not 12 hours. But no problems.
    3. I got my life back. I wasn't falling asleep in the afternoons and I didn't need 1/2 a mars bar to be able to exercise. Glicklazstuff made me whacked after 15 mins of vigorous exercise. I can now win races again.

    Bad side..... Erm.... forgetting to inject and wondering why I'm 11.5 next day.
    Oh yes, Bad bad side, having to tell DVLA and having to send my licence off to get a 3 year one. That sucks, getting bullied by DVLA! should be a law against that.

    PS never had a hypo.
     
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  4. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    Marvellous, thanks so much guys, sounds like a really positive for you both!
     
  5. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    To me as a T1 though... I can't understand why if people are struggling with getting good control on tablets why they aren't just shifted to MDI . Its certainly nothing to be scared off
     
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  6. Lou73

    Lou73 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I find that that there are a lot of people who say that it's bad to go onto insulin - and should be controlled be diet. However that's not always possible. My diabetes is steroid induced due to another medical condition. And oral meds did nothing for me. Insulin has helped tremendously.
    There can be such a stigma attached as people already think that we've caused this ourselves and think we're taking the easy way out with insulin - and that is not the case.
    PurpleDragon - good luck if you do start insulin - I'm sure you'll be feeling better in no time :)
     
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  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I was relieved when I moved from the complete set of tablets which were failing and finally got the insulin I wanted. I wouldn't go back. With the 4mm needle and pen it's a doddle. With Basal/Bolus you have full control so essentially are near to 'normal'. Yes, the DVLA thing is a nuisance and you do need to test before driving and avoid hypos, but that's about it for me. You may be tempted to eat too many carbs again and put on weight so I still keep the carbs down.
     
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  8. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    This is exactly my situation now Daibell. I am on the full dose of everything...honestly I rattle I really do! But even with this full raft of meds my BS is still too high. Low carbing worked first off but it's obvious that all the combined preventative measures have had it.
    You have given me the exact information I needed so thank you.
     
  9. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    Thank you everyone who replied to my question. :)

    T2 diabetes is an odd journey in many ways. For me, when I was diagnosed and started low carbing I had the innocent outlook of thinking that would be it for the rest of my life, if I was careful I could control this. Not so. So off I started on the drugs trail, again believing that I would be fine if I did low carbing plus the drugs but not as you may imagine quite so innocently owing to the huge amount of reading I had one. And here I have arrived at this stage with innocence and naiveté completely blown out of the water but with more understanding of what comes next and an acceptance which should enable me to progress with my care.

    I wish I didn't have diabetes but this is mine, and many others, reality. We deal with what we can and if we don't know....we ask. Fortunately, this forum is here with such knowledge and experience available that I knew I wouldn't be ignorant afterwards.

    So thanks again :happy:
     
  10. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    Oh one more thing. Once onto injections, did you still have to take any diabetes related meds? Sounds a bit unlikely really but I just wondered.

    Thank you.
     
  11. Lou73

    Lou73 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been told to continue with my Gliclazide - even though it wasn't doing anything - until my HbA1c is under control.
     
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  12. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My experience:

    1 Were you worried about changing? - no, I wasn't worried I was relieved as I finally found out why my oral medication wasn't working when they told me I hardly produce any insulin myself. (they did the GAD and c-peptide tests again)

    2 Did you find it easy? - The easy part was injecting believe it or not. I only was a bit nervous on the first one, then it was easy after that. The hard part was learning to understand what the insulin does to me and also trying to avoid hypos.

    3 Most important of all for me...are there good things about this change? E.g. More energy, less lethargy etc. - The best thing about the change for me is finally I got my hbA1c under 7%. My endocrinologist is happy with my sugar levels. My sugar levels can go crazy at times (like they are this week) because I can get so sick with my other conditions. So overall my endo explained to me that he is really impressed with my diabetic management considering I have digestive issues, etc. He said he sees plenty of people who aren't dealing with what I am and are not managing their diabetes that well. He also stressed that on insulin it is very important to learn your 'safe' number and to avoid hypos. I have found I have more hypos now since being on insulin, so it can get frustrating. Also because I get sick a lot it makes it hard to know if I should be adjusting my basal dosage as sometimes when I do it bites me. Like today I'm thinking I need to adjust again, but I'm nervous as last time I did I hypo'd straight away. But you will get to know what works for you. If you have other stuff like me, you just learn to live with what you're dealing with and hopefully you have a good medical team. My endocrinologist sees me every 6 months for an update and he is more interested in my overall health and wants to know what has happened since I last saw him and what meds I'm on. etc. He finds me fascinating I think. He's been a big help to me though... he's even phoned me at home when I've had other hormone problems to give me advice and to check how I am. He's really good. So yeh insulin has overall been a good change for me.
     
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    #12 Mep, Nov 8, 2015 at 9:05 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 8, 2015
  13. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks so much Mep, so much useful info there. Sounds like you have a great team behind you...not surprised they find you fascinating!
     
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  14. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    I was thinking about all the great info I got on here and thought you might like an update on my OP.
    Well, it happened as I thought it would and I have moved onto injected insulin. I started at only 10 units of Lantus and am now up to 16 increasing twice a week on Mon and Thurs until my BS levels come good. I am feeling better but very gradually which I suppose is the way it's supposed to be otherwise I would be in danger of hypo's. The injections are easy and I have had no problems although if I am a bit heavy handed I end up with slight bruising. My BS is falling slightly and it's odd that although they aren't significantly lower I do feel so much better.
    I think I have been very fortunate in my Diabetes Nurse. Clair low carbs even though she isn't diabetic so I have full support with that. No lectures or any of the nasties that others on here seem to have gone through. She is also fully conversant with the Glycaemic Index and Glycaemic Loading which I use too in conjunction with Low Carbing. I am hoping for good results eventually.
    One thing that bothered me a lot is the weight gain that seems to be expected with insulin. I am not a small person and have worked hard at losing about 5 kg. I have no desire to put it back on again but this seems to be talked about as if it's inevitable. Any comments on this aspect of T2 with Insulin?

    ;)
     
  15. bigjohn9916

    bigjohn9916 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Weight gain is not inevitable I have managed to lose 2 stone whilst being on insulin. If I feel hungry outside of mealtimes, I only eat if my blood sugar tests below 4.2, If not I find something to do to take my mind off my stomach, once went for a bus ride just to stay away from temptation.:)
     
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  16. PurpleDragon

    PurpleDragon Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks bigjohn, that's really encouraging! Been bothering me quite a bit :)
     
  17. MellitusTrap

    MellitusTrap Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    #Legend
     
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