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worst diabetes incident?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by IceLover, May 3, 2017.

  1. IceLover

    IceLover Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    guys today my insulin pump started beeping REALLLLYY LOUD in class and literally had many pairs of eyes staring at me like i was a bloody alien. Instead of telling them the real reason my dumb self decided to tell them all including the substitute teacher that it was my phone and the reason why it wouldnt stop beeping is because it was frozen Then i walked out the classroom to try and fix the problem and got in trouble.

    But after the teacher came after me i told him it was my pump and he was actually sooooo understanding. He even said " its nothing to be ashamed and embarrassed of but next time just tell me" . I expected him to shout and he didntt he was soo great about it!!! The reason why i didnt tell him in the first place is because i findd the whole telling people you have diabetes thing very nerve wracking and awkardd

    Do you guys have any embrassing/awkward situations that happened due to our best friend(diabetes)?? MAKEEE ME FEEL BETTER ABOUT THIS SITUATION PLSS
     
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  2. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    One of my biggest mistakes early on was NOT telling people I had diabetes and took insulin. I'd get low and people would think I was drunk. Now I wear a MedAlert bracelet 24/7 and let people know. Not people I get paired up with on the golf course but people I hang out with. I used to wear a MedAlert necklace that wasn't seen by the doctor who found me on the floor of my office about 4 years ago so I switched to the bracelet.
     
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  3. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @IceLover ,

    Yeah, I've had a few.. One a while back when I got roped in to do "security" work at a rugby match last year.
    It was my first time & I found myself surrounded by some "hardcore" guys..
    I knew the dress code & was issued with a high viz coat & a number.
    All my D stuff was in this little bag.
    One of the managers came up to me where I was stationed & he told me I had to ditch the bag.
    I mentioned it contained my diabetic stuff, his eyes softened & he held his hands up.
    Lol, you would have thought I had pulled out a loaded gun....

    He was quite cool. Not that I needed any help he would come back & check I was OK...
     
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  4. Lynz84

    Lynz84 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I shared an office with my manager (who was a nurse thankfully) and I was in hypo but didnt realise. He offered me a cuppa and custard creams and I told him to stick the custard creams up his (insert profanity here). He realised wat was wrong thankfully. I couldnt understand why I was so mad at the biscuits lol
     
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  5. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I once had a super speedy onset hypo (had pizza and doughnuts for lunch maybe not the best idea) and I tripped/ face planted walking home. My friend ran home to get my sister as she didn't know what to do, my sister gave me a carton of orange juice (which is my normal hypo treatment). As she kept insisting I drink the orange juice and I was getting more and more frustrated with the situation I ended up squeezing the rest kf the juice all down my sister in full view of our neighbours! Safe to say my sister was not very pleased and my neighbours were confused as to why a 15 year old wasn't having what seemed to be a temper tantrum... all turned out ok though apart from a few odd looks in the following weeks
     
  6. DiabeticDadUK

    DiabeticDadUK Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I wish I'd been more open, especially as a child and teenager. It's tough when you're young as you probably fear being judged by the ignorant or bullied by the cowards. As an adult, I'm far less concerned these days. It got to a point when I just thought 'I don't give a s... I'll tell who I want'.

    My advice is to be yourself. Never be ashamed of your condition. If someone is unkind then they are not worth your time or energy. Do NOT let diabetes stop you being you. Take care.
     
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  7. phdiabetic

    phdiabetic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Fellow teen here (diagnosed age 17)! I am extremely open about my diabetes, have no problems doing diabetes stuff in public and enjoy educating others about type 1. However, I have definitely had some awkward moments in public because of diabetes. I have sat on the floor in the middle of a shopping centre to check my blood sugar (got some odd looks from a lady walking by), and stood outside an opposite-gender public toilet for 20min because my blood sugar was low and that was the best place I could find to have a hypo (this was in a crowded convention centre). They weren't so embarrassing though, because the only people surprised were total strangers.

    The worst moments are ones involving people you know. I wear a CGM, which can be quite noisy with constant alarms, so in public I usually turn down the volume or mute it. Recently I was in a lecture at uni, and my CGM vibrated on the table. The lecturer heard, thought it was my phone and asked the class whether I should get a penalty for my phone going off (he has a mobile phone policy that he explained at the start of session). I had to explain that it was a medical device and not a phone. He knows I'm a type 1, and after class he came up to me and apologised, but at the time it was super embarrassing because I was having a bad blood sugar day and I hated explaining it in front of everyone. I get good grades and always participate in class, so I don't know why he decided to pick on me that lecture, maybe he was just having a bad day or something. It doesn't feel embarrassing anymore, just a funny thing that happened to me, but at the time my blood sugar was a bit high and I was mortified that my blood sugars had interrupted class.

    Another one was at the local chess club - I've played there for years and know the other players pretty well, and we're a very casual club in that phones are allowed to be turned on (usually in chess electronics are banned due to cheating). I have my CGM on my phone and was looking at it during a game, which I eventually won. My opponent complained about my phone use afterwards (saying that I could have been looking at a chess engine) and I was almost penalised with a loss, even though I offered to let them look at my phone and check that I wasn't cheating. I was pretty offended that they thought I would cheat, firstly because I've known them for years and thought they would know my character better, and secondly because I was the strongest player at the club and so winning the game was not unexpected. I'm over it now though - still good friends with the guy who accused me of cheating (if anything I probably played worse than usual that game because I was a little high). Funnily enough, I was recently playing a game with the guy who runs all the tournaments here, who is a huge stickler for rules. I tried to explain about my pump and CGM before the game, expecting him to be suspicious during the game if I didn't show him the devices, but he said not to worry about it and that he trusted me. So everything went better than expected!

    So don't worry about taking care of diabetes in public - good people will be sympathetic and even try to help you out, and if people think worse of you for being a type 1 then they're not worth knowing anyway. Usually, other people won't even notice you checking your blood sugar or taking a shot because they're only thinking about whatever they're doing. And if you do get into trouble like with your teacher, most people will be understanding if you explain the situation.
     
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  8. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    I try to measure my BG before going into a long meeting to avoid doing so in front of customers.
    On one occasion, my fingers were cold. I pricked my finger but no blood came out. I pricked again. Still nothing. I shook my hand to get the blood flowing. And boy, did it flow. It splattered everywhere: over my desk, my note book and all the way down my crisp white shirt. No change of clothes and, by now, I was running late. So straight into an important customer meeting with my blood-splattered shirt.
    Surprisingly, no one commented. It was as if attending a meeting direct from a murder scene was perfectly normal. Or perhaps too scary to consider.
     
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  9. slip

    slip Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    At the time it may have been embarrassing, you will later look at it with a positive attitude and a funny situation you will laugh at when remembering the time. Continue to be your self - smart, conscientious and above all safe!

    If you want a funny story, a T1 friend of mine back in the day when insulin came in vials and you had a syringe to draw up your dose. Said friend was in a dubious pub in the middle of London buying a second hand car - well closing the deal over a pint, he's at the bar with the seller and confirms the price and reaches into his inside jacket pocket and pulls out a wad of notes just as the bar man is stood in front of the pair of them, and a syringe also falls out of his pocket and bounces across the bar. So the barman sees two dodgy looking guys closing a deal with a load of cash and a needle skipping across the bar.............! If only the barman had asked him up front, it would have saved the boys in blue and my friend a lot of hassle........and I think the deal fell through after that! :hilarious:
     
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  10. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
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    I think with diabetes you either embrace it and deal with it or you try to hide it away, I was very much into hiding it when I first got diagnosed until one day my partner told me to inject at the table in the restaurant where we were eating instead of running off to the loo to do it, from that moment forward the flood gates opened and I would do it when I needed to do it, just discretely though not in your face and I have no issue telling anyone my status. I tend to think if I do have a hypo that I want people to help me if I need it and not gawp at me as if what on earth is wrong with her. However more importantly by embracing it was accepting that I had to deal with it and get on with life and not use my diabetes as an emotional barrier.
     
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  11. teasytux

    teasytux Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hello Icelover,

    I wouldn't let it bother you. It was very nice of the teacher in the end! I recall from my education days some really great understanding teachers. A couple of things over my 45 diabetic years I'd like to share. I was 17/18 & had a night out with my girlfriend. I walked her home past midnight, said our goodbyes etc.. & was about a mile from my flat when I suddenly went very hypo. I managed to get to a phone box near by & somehow dialled 999. I spoke to the operator in complete gobbledygook for a few seconds before collapsing out cold in the phone box. I came too a little & could hear a police officer shouting at me. I again, in gobbledygook was trying to say diabetic to him but he ignored me & I still remember the words he said to his partner, just leave him, he's ******! I vaguely heard the other officer speak before passing out cold again. A few hours later I woke up in hospital.

    That experience was quite embarrassing especially as a police officer presumed I was a drunk passed out. Another time aged 17/18, I had just started a new job & was very keen to make a great impression & neglected to take a mid morning coffee break with a snack. I remember walking into the warehouse to collect some print machine paper & job files. I suddenly started losing my limb control & sight & ended up in a heap on the floor. I could hear the warehouse chap panicking & ringing the personnel lady. All I remember then is my boss, the personnel lady & a 1st aider around me trying to stop my arms flying about, ripping the blouse of the personnel lady & her saying, oooh Simon!! I went out cold & came too a little bit on an ambulance stretcher going to hospital. I was so so embarrassed, especially for ripping the personnel lady's blouse open!! Some time later the MD's chauffeur & the personnel lady picked me up from hospital & I was driven back to work in the MD's Jag. Luckily, the personnel lady saw the funny side & I must of apologised umpteen times to her. They are my only embarrassing incidents, both due to sudden bad hypo.

    It really doesn't matter at the end of the day getting embarrassed, we're all human & should just laugh it off!! Be honest though, no need for stories. I wish you well, all the best,

    Tux
     
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