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1st Hba1c back

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by CF, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. CF

    CF · Member

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    After being diagnosed with a 104 score 3 months of sensible eating and one Metformin every day and one every five days out of seven that I would forget I’ve seen it reduced to 41 I am clearly over the moon but what’s the Nex step do I see the GP to reduce tablets how long do I need to see them and be tested for - I would imagine for next two years maybe? thoughts please ?
     
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  2. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the surgery, I suppose. I've been in the non-diabetic range for two years, and my check-ups have been reduced to once every 6 months rather than every 3 months. I suppose if I want I can reduce to once a year, but I'd rather keep things a little more regular, myself. You've done really well, but most surgeries want to keep an eye on you once you're diagnosed, and that's in all honesty, a good thing. I know it's inconvenient sometimes, but T2 isn't just "gone" when your numbers are improving. You're still diabetic, even with non-diabetic numbers. You have to keep them in check, and having regular tests, including for co-morbidities (like high bloodpressure, kidney faillure and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), is the wise thing to do.

    As for reducing meds, it's certainly something you can discuss with your GP.
     
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  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi CF, very well done on your huge reduction in HbA1c! You’ve just sneaked into the non diabetic range, but as Jo says you’ll always be diabetic and should still get regular reviews. I initially had reviews every three months but once my HbA1c was non diabetic for a year I have now gone onto six monthly for HbA1c check with other checks like feet and eyes yearly, unless a problem crops up. As for Metformin, I’m quite happy to stay on it to maintain things as they are but a lot of people here do stop it, it’s something to discuss with your HCPs.
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Well done. That is a magnificent achievement. :)

    You are a diabetic, you will continue to have regular blood tests and reviews. These may be 6 monthly, or maybe 12 monthly, but will continue probably forever. Your GP may decide to code you as "in remission" or "diabetes resolved" at some point in the future. This depends entirely on the GP, but the blood tests should continue despite the coding. You will still have at least an annual review with the nurse for health checks such as blood pressure and foot tickling, and you will continue to have the annual retinal screening, no matter what the coding. This is all good common sense.

    As for the Metformin, again this depends on the GP, but all he can do is advise you. He cannot compel you to take them. The decision is yours.
     
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  5. Emma_369

    Emma_369 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Fabulous reduction in Hba1c! Well done
     
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  6. CF

    CF · Member

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    Ok great - got better advice in here than off GP initially so will see what they have to say. Pleased with the results and know it’s not over but pleased that it was diet and hard work and not just a reliance on meds that got me there.
     
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  7. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don’t wholly agree with the notion that “you’ll always be diabetic”. Diabetes is a symptom of hyperinsulinemia. If you can lower your insulin levels, no longer have the symptoms of diabetes (hyperglycaemia), and can achieve this without medication then you’re not diabetic. You’re naturally looking after your metabolism through a diet that you would have retrospectively been better off eating for your whole life.

    At worst, you could be described as glucose intolerant, but that’s why you became diabetic to begin with, so nothing changes there. I understand it’s a matter of perspective though. I guess it depends on whether you think the western diet is “normal”. Anyway well done OP. It’s a great feeling taking back control of your health.
     
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  8. Ross.Walker

    Ross.Walker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    I took 3 years to come off meds. Take your time to learn how to work this out long term. I still surprise myself at the odd highs, lows and my idiocy at not seeing it before hand.

    However don't loose the dream of being med free, it's a motivating target
     
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  9. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Don't be surprised if your surgery shows very little interest in you from now on - I have not seen a doctor with regard to diabetes since diagnosis, and the nurses just do basic checks and push statins.
    I am not much of a worrier, so I just stick to the low carb and hope to be close to the normal range year on year.
     
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  10. PenguinMum

    PenguinMum Type 2 · Expert

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    @CF all I can say is Wow! You will be a huge inspiration to anyone newly diagnosed with a high number. To get it down to non diabetic in 3 months deserves a medal you have really been strong.
     
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  11. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Not sure I agree with that. I manage my Hba1c with diet alone (115 at diagnosis and three months later 36). However that is achieved through a very very strict 20g carbs per day or less. If I even look at a carb, be it potato, rice, carrot etc, my levels go through the roof. Even if my Hba1c is under control 3 years on, I will know I can’t eat carbs and will still consider myself most definitely diabetic..... unfortunately. I realise this is a noose round my neck for the rest of my life but would prefer to reap the benefits of this way of eating rather than take drugs if possible. I think many people think that if you say you are “no longer diabetic” because their Hba1c is good, they may think they can eat potatoes, bread etc and revert to a normal diet

    I realise there are varying degrees of the condition and often wonder if the lower the Hba1c at diagnosis, the more flexibility you have with carbs.
     
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  12. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Yes I understand that viewpoint, but in my opinion that makes you glucose intolerant. You’re only eating the same diet that would have prevented you from getting diabetes in the first place. If you have no symptoms and don’t use medication then you do not have clinical diabetes. You may however get it again if you consume the same foods that gave you it to begin with.

    But that’s just my view and I’m sure we can disagree. I think the decider hinges upon whether or not one thinks that “normal” is a diet based on sugars and grains. Personally I don’t think it is :)
     
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  13. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My diet is far from normal and not what many people would eat if not diabetic.... and what I ate before was good. Whole food vegetarian. Never ate a lot of sweet or processed things. Virtually no junk food. Cooking everything from scratch including bread, when I had it. No symptoms and BOOM!! Diagnosed despite being slim. Too thin now according to MIL (although she doesn’t know).

    It’s rubbish but I know I can’t eat carbs so most definitely diabetic despite not eating them to maintain levels. Maybe a bit like an alcoholic - even if they don’t drink, they always consider themselves an alcoholic? Maybe not the best analogy but you get the gist.

    I should add I would have symptoms if I ate more than 30g carbs a day.
     
  14. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Unless you are getting side effects from metformin I would personally not change what is working until you have got good results for a few years.

    Expect them to want a full blood count to check if the A1c due to low red blood cell numbers.
     
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