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Alcohol....teenage Daughter Drunk And At 2 Bg Reading

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Red_Letti, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. Red_Letti

    Red_Letti Type 1 · Member

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    My daughter is drunk and passed out,snoring,breathing but her BG monitor says she is at 2....so I have given her the glycogen injection in the bum,she didn’t even feel it......what do I do next ......not a calm mother....
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Dial 111 for the NHS advice line. Do it now.
     
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  3. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Check her regularly - if there is not a rapid recovery and soon then you might need an ambulance.
     
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  4. Mel dCP

    Mel dCP Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Call for help ASAP.
     
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  5. Jenny15

    Jenny15 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Call for help.

    BTW you are a great parent for stepping in. And you did exactly the right thing. Well done.
     
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  6. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Please let us know how your daughter gets on. There's almost always someone here to chat to overnight so if you feel the need for support do not hesitate to reach out.
     
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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Call an ambulance let em know T1, low & suspected heavily inebriated... Also inform them of glycogen administration when they arrive...

    Please let us know how you got on.? As a son of a "T1 mum." More for your sake.
     
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  8. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Red_Letti,
    A nightmare for you !
    I hope the ambulance has arrived and your daughter has received the treatment she needs.
    Hopefully she has or is fully recovering.
    What you could not have known is that alcohol impedes glucagon's action to release glucose from the liver.
    (type1.org - Why Doesn't Glucagon Work with Alcohol)
    YOU DID THE VERY BEST YOU COULD IN THE CIRCUMSTANCES.
    I imagine the ambulance would have given her a glucose infusion.
    Once the adrenaline rush settles and you have been able to settle your breathing, and kept breathing steadily:
    in the next days you, your daughter and your family have an opportunity. Counsellors and other professionals will
    likely be involved to support and assist you all in working out what to do to prevent this happening with your daughter again.
    And this is not about blame, self recriminations - it is about now and the future. Personally I have learnt to cloak anger in sadness. Sadness about how this happened and what could have prevented this. Anger and frustration burn us, sadness leads to hope for something better in the future.
    Please make use of family, friends, supports, this site and so on to support you and your daughter.
    Best Wishes for that future. Of course your daughter can use this site and others for help and support too, if she wishes.
     
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  9. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @Red_Letti Can you let us know how your daughter is ? Hoping you are both ok.
     
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  10. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is why all these teenage rights of passage are so much harder if a teenager has T1 @kitedoc!
    I hope your daughter’s recovering now @Red_Letti. It’ll have been a rough time for you but you did the right thing. I expect the A&E staff and the paramedics have seen it all before.
    With any luck your daughter won’t want to repeat the experience, especially if they also gave her a stomach pump.
     
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  11. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there.

    Heavy drinking with Type 1 is very dangerous as you have just experienced. The glucose levels go extremely high but then drop like a rock from a High Rise.

    Hypoglycemia is different from the "usual" you would get during the daytime. So hoping this is a one off and that your daughter is not the type of drinker that I was 14 years ago. I am in recovery but remember the early morning Hypos after a heavy drinking session. I would wake up normally around 4/5am and would not be able to move. Fear, anxiety, hyperventilating. It truly is terrifying to experience.

    You did the right thing. Your daughter may not have a drink problem but any excessive drinking (especially in the evening) will create a high risk. Also taking a blood test prior to bed will tell you the sugar level is extremely high and will lull your daughter into believing it is ok to go to sleep. It isn't ! Her levels will drop.

    Try to get your daughter to understand this. If she goes out evening drinking she must eat something for every 2 or 3 drinks she consumes. Half a bag of crisps every couple of drinks or a sandwich. Bag of peanuts etc.

    I lived on my own all my life and during my drinking and I should have died due to my alcoholism. Type 1 and heavy alcohol consumption can kill.

    I don't mean to scare you but she needs to be aware of the dangers associated with heavy drinking living with this condition especially Type 1. My sugars would go down to 1.3 every time I woke with this type of Hypo.

    As stated it may be a one off and just one of those things she will need to learn form.

    Please PM me if you think I can help in any way.

    Kev
     
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  12. Ziggy2017

    Ziggy2017 Type 3 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi red_letti I hope your daughter is feeling better but next better to take pro cations maybe a slightly higher carb meal before your daughter goes out and takes plenty of hypo treatments with her not forgetting her meter of course
    Best of luck
    Ziggy
     
  13. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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