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Any lifters/bodybuilders out there? Phil Graham's Diabetic Muscle & Fitness Guide - any good?

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by IronLioness, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,

    Just diagnosed with T2, looking for so many answers to the umpteen questions I have on diabetes but one of them is gym work, specifically lifting - I saw Phil's book advertised, I'm keen to know thoughts on his strategy and principles for diabetics and training.

    From what I've read online it seems strength training gets the thumbs up! Is this true? I *really* don't want to give up my gum work if I don't have to.

    All experience and thoughts much appreciated .
     
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  2. Safi

    Safi Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Are you on any medications? They can make any exercise tricky until you get used to them & how your own body responds. If not on meds then I'd say have at it with the same provisos I'd give a non-diabetic - do your research, perfect your form, listen to your body & don't overdo it :)

    EDIT to add: I've not read the book in question I'm afraid so can't comment on that front
     
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  3. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No meds, just diet and exercise. I've been a gym goer for over 15years but seriously lifting over the past 2. I've read some articles tonight which *seem* to indicate strength training is actually beneficial for T2 diabetes. I'll investigate some more. I rarely carb up too much, protein seems to work for me, and I've checked out my protein shakes and they're low in carbs and sugar. I think I need to investigate those some more, though. Thanks for the reply, much appreciate the info
     
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  4. Safi

    Safi Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I believe it's unquestionably beneficial. Going low carb you may see your gym performance suffer at first but most experienced exercisers adapt pretty quickly. Dr Ted Naiman is a name to look out for - I don't thing he lifts (more bodyweight stuff) but he bodybuilds & is low carb. There is also the Ketogains group on reddit. Good luck.
     
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  5. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Super! Thanks Safi - off to check out Dr Ted right now!
     
  6. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Have you seen the thread on regular moderate exercise? Some knowledgeable people in there. Tagging @kev-w and @johnpol as they may be able to help.
     
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  7. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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  8. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible · Guest

    Personally, I find weight lifting temporarily increases my BG. This is counteracted by the cardio which I usually do before or after weights and brings my BG down.
    Overall it goes down but I would recommend testing before and after weights to find out what impact they have on BG; we are all different.
     
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  9. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A tough one as I don't 'know' T2D! Testing would be the key as heavier training 'can' raise your blood sugar due to stress, prescribed meds can lower it, a good diet is essential but then a good T2 diet could differ from one for a T1 due to insulin usage.

    In an ideal world you'd test pre training, and at the end of the session, a raised blood will leave you feeling tired so best avoided, but that's the key, keeping your blood sugar down, and diet is the way forward there but there's no reason I can think of why you can't continue what you're doing in a gym.

    If that's any help.... :)
     
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  10. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What are your goals for training? And what is your diet? You definitely should keep on training btw!
     
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  11. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Mainly the goal is to build core strength, my body is powerful and I want to keep that level of strength. Also, over the past two years I've got more into lifting, I can lift relatively heavy 260kg on the leg press etc, but my focus recently is for a body transformation but admittedly, my diet has been all over the place/inconsistent. But, it looks like I just got the kick up the @ss with this diagnosis, to take things seriously.

    Diet wise, I've always been high protein and mixed carbs, so I'll need to cut that or change up the macros, maybe. I've a friend that bodybuilds and he did it (lost weight and built shape) through keto, but I'm wary of that. My willpower is not great so I'm thinking of just going low/no carbs then protein it up with lots of 'good' vegetables.
     
  12. Sean01

    Sean01 · Guest

    Hi @IronLioness

    I was diagnosed with T2 in October 2015 - gym work - all the way....and here's the detail:

    I competed as a body builder in the mid 80's. Back then there was a body builder called Tim Belknap - He was T1 and an absolute mass monster - short but solid. When I got diagnosed, articles on Tim Belknap were the first place I searched. (OK T1 is different from T2 - but.............

    So here I am three years later (almost exactly.)
    I have moved away from body building to strength training and strongman and I wish I had found this sport 30 years ago! I still train a bit like a body builder but I train for strength (not shape) - I follow the ideas laid out by Dorian Yates in his book A Warrior's story.

    Thorough warm up 20-30 minutes walking on a treadmill (walking is FANTASTIC for managing blood sugar levels.) Next up a thorough warm up of the shoulders and elbow joints (Recovering from a rotator cuff injury) and then the body part specific warm up and stretching. This might all take 30-40 minutes.

    From then on one body part per session. 4-5 exercises 1-2 sets per exercise. 1st set - 12-15 reps, 2nd set, pile the weight on and go for it 6-8 reps, followed by partials (they work for me) but anything to extend the set and drive beyond normal failure. Usually 2-3 minutes rest between each set. To finish - one or two exercises - strong man, linked to the body part e.g,. on delts night - log press and viking press, leg day - yoke and farmers walk. Back day - stones.

    Each body part - once per week


    Strength and diabtetes.
    There are lots of competitive athletes at my gym, power lifters, strongmen, olympic lifters etc - all following meticulous programmes and keeping meticulous log books.

    If I had a log book it would have one line per work out:
    Objective: like last time but more

    The only thing I want to achieve in the gym..............is more than last time. I literally lift heavier every single work out.

    I tend to train 6 weeks on and 2 weeks off but walk every day. On my first week back, I am typically weaker than I was at the end of the previous 6 week session, but it comes back by the following week and then moves on from there.


    Diet
    Learn to read your moods and energy levels when you do your blood tests. You will get to a stage where you can have a pretty good guess at what your numbers are just by how you feel.

    I prefer to stick to more or less the same meal plan every day. I don't have a difference between training and non training days, as I am not using (much) carbs, so there is no need to load.

    Meal plan (I also have diverticulitis, asthma, and I have to watch my blood pressure.)
    Also becoming more 'paleo'

    breakfast: protein shake (very low carb protein powder), banana (heart), cinnamon (blood pressure) full fat milk and greek yogurt.

    1st lunch 3 egg omelette, (one yolk) spinach and tomatoes

    2nd lunch as above

    5 p.m.
    meat - mince/steak/ pork chop with green veg - spinach or green beans, raw nuts and olives.

    7:30 to 9 p.m. work out

    9:15 - protein shake as above.

    Snacks: sun dried tomatoes, olives, nuts and occasional dark chocolate
    Drinks - 3 litres of water with a couple of lemons (to keep the kidneys flush)
    Black coffee and black tea

    Cheats: I'm human - but sometimes, you have to walk away
    Alcohol - not fussed, almost tea total, except for a couple of Oliver Read style benders with old school mates just to prove we can still do it and get up the next day - but I only drink single malt scotch

    Holidays are hard work - I walk for 5k and spend an hour in the gym before breakfast. I then train around noon and then late afternoon - 6-7 days a week. (Food temptation is everywhere. I try my best. Three work outs help)

    Extras:
    I check my bloods before and right after training. I'm aiming for the levels to be the same

    Exercising will release a lot of sugar into the blood. The trick is to release it slowly and use it up.

    My style of training has evolved to fit my lifestyle (parent with twins in their A level year) work, other health conditions and my head.

    I'm 53 and 5ft 8. I squat 280lbs for reps. leg press 900 lbs for reps
    T Bar - 100kgs for reps, Shoulder press - 120 kgs for reps, Still leg dead lifts 150 kgs. (All from the last week)
    Atlas stones - up to 105Kgs.

    I don't compete. I'm 53 and 5ft 8

    I know you will understand this:
    Your body is a machine. Bigger, more efficient muscles use up sugar much better, so a stronger body will help you deal with your diabetes.

    Good luck with your journey.

    Sean
     
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  13. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I am a type 1 who volunteers with type 2s and a trainer though never been interested in anything other than keeping muscle tone so not an expert in hypertrophy and strength.
    Sean has given you pretty good low carb routine there. You don't have to dive straight into keto as your comments indicate you are not ready for it. As I emphasise if you do decide to eat less carbs, you should be careful to replace those foods with high quality fats and proteins (try and avoid low quality whey protein snacks which can be sugary and don't have any other useful nutrients). Lots of people here do not believe that this fat is a problem; if your wariness is about that aspect of going low carb I'd get a lipid panel done prior to a change.
    Also you do need to generate a little insulin to make new muscle. so eating a little carb in the evening would be advisable.
    Your blood sugar will likely rise during HiiT and lifting sessions because it is a stressor; lower intensity e.g. walk on the treadmill will lower your glycogen muscle supplies but as you are aware, an energy deficiency will result in muscle getting catabolised therefore you will need to replace lost energy from carbs with more fat and protein (preferably from natural sources). Maintaining lean mass will enable you to be insulin sensitive and this in conjunction with eating less carb will likely help you not to go onto medication and then insulin.
     
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  14. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @IronLioness . I’ve mentioned Phil Graham on the forum a few times. Never read any books by him only watched him on YouTube. I’ve never had the desire needed to go down the bodybuilding/ sculpting route, but PG seems to know his stuff and in my opinion comes across as genuine and well informed.
    As a T1 I’m not sure any advice or tips I might have would be right for you. @Sean01 is definitely your best bet for advice and tips. Dedication all the way for this guy.
    One thing I will say is this.......diabetes should not stop you from achieving anything and everything in the gym.
    Diabetes has been inspirational for me over the years in life and especially in the gym.
    Good luck, keep training.
     
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  15. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I love your pseudo!

    I have a friend at my gym who is T2. When he was diagnosed his GP told him he would soon be on insulin. He was terrified of this, which was somewhat misguided but fortunate, as he was inspired to start training seriously with weights. By the time I met him he was rising 60 but had built himself a terrific physique and amazed his GP with his A1cs. This despite the fact that he is pretty clueless about diet!

    I am pre-diabetic, not sure if I am pre-T1 or pre-T2. I train regularly with weights and also run and walk. I have frequently checked my bg before and after exercise and have certainly not seen a rise in bg, but perhaps my exercise is just not vigorous enough! I make sure to eat lots of real-food protein before, after, and even during exercise if I start to feel hungry or tired. I don't eat carbs for exercise, as they raise my bg too much. I am probably consuming <20g carbs daily. I am hoping that my body is gradually getting used to this but it is difficult to tell as I have had a bad few months health-wise which has impacted my training, so I am necessarily weaker than I was before.

    Some people find that walking after eating carbs lowers bg, but this has not worked for me.

    I am not clear if you have a meter?
     
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  16. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Excellent info, thanks for tagging GoonerG! I really don't want my training to suffer from this, I know I might need to tweak it, but am keen to do whatever needed.
     
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  17. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Kev, much appreciated. Just trying to work out the best training schedule.
     
  18. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Sean01, thank you SO much for this! All the information is super helpful! I'm determined to keep on with my training, I need to figure out my BG levels first I think - today I had a bit of a moment which freaked me out - not had actual carb-carbs since Thursday last week when diagnosed but they must have plummeted because I felt dizzy and woozy as hell! Squire scary... Had a bit of sugary yogurt and a nap and felt fine but it came on so so suddenly I'm glad I wasn't in a gym with a barbell on my back, to be honest. Dorian Yates is the man, I like his work ethos and muscle development - best quad and chest definition! Old school don't mess around.

    I'm away at the moment, back to iron on Thursday so I'll start testing out a new regime and see what works.

    Thanks again!
     
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  19. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Nicole, thank you for this. I think you're right, I'm going to need to factor in a little carbs in there somewhere because today, after 4 days no carbs and now normal activity, I had a bit of a energy drain. Very odd, very scary, but I need to make sure when I go back to training on Thursday, that I'm fuelling my body enough. I don't really want to go through too many experiences like that so I need to track my BG. I need to keep building my strength.
     
  20. IronLioness

    IronLioness Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for this, to be honest, gym and strength training has literally saved my life in the past few years so I'm keep to tweak, revise, test out, whatever I need to do to keep doing it. I think the diagnosis really has been the wake up call for me to take my overall health, not just strength, very seriously. I'm 40 and can't get away with things I used to do. I absolutely see my body now as a machine to be fuelled in the best way possible to keep it functioning. I don't want this to get worse, I've seen the 'complications' that can happen. Onwards and upwards!
     
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