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Any other UNDERWEIGHT T2s out there??

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by miahara, Jan 4, 2017.

  1. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Most, in fact the vast majority of discussion and assistance for T2s is directed towards losing weight, and given that 90% of T2s need to do this, this is how it should be. However I do feel a bit left out in the cold as far as advice for weight gain goes. There's very,very little advice anywhere about a LCHF diet that incorporates dietary components to aid weight gain for the 10% who need it.
    At diagnosis my BMI was 18, at my last review in July it was 17.5, though I suspect it actually hadn't changed. I'm currently about 8 stone 12 lbs, 56 kg and about 5foot 9 inches. I never bothered about weighing myself as I was never overweight, and the only times I stepped on the scales was to weigh myself and then myself plus holiday suitcases. I first became aware that I may have had lost weight due to some comments from friends we only see on holiday who commented to my wife. I think I lost about 10kg from my 'normal' weight over about 2 years.
    So, any suggestions about foods to help weight gain without increasing blood glucose would be welcome as would any other helpful hints. I have found that a LCHF diet has worked wonders for my BG, but it hasn't done much for my BMI.
     
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    #1 miahara, Jan 4, 2017 at 9:10 PM
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
  2. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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  3. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    If I were you I would count my non carb calories and increase my food intake of those by 50%, all the time checking fasting blood glucose to make sure it had not gone up too much.
    Have you had a C peptide test to make sure your insulin output is OK?
    I look very skinny at a bmi of 22 so I know how you feel.

    atb Derek
     
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I wasn't skinny to begin with. I lost over a third of my body weight on LCHF. When the time came to stop losing weight I had no intention of increasing carbs, so I increased my fats (mainly from protein such as eggs and cheese). I counted calories until I reached the correct balance to stop losing and start maintaining. This was not easy. It took some effort with counting, weighing and recording, and quite a bit of time to get that balance right. I have now maintained for over 2 years. I'm sure if I added more calories I would gain. All I do now is eat to my meter and my scales.
     
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  5. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that advice Derek. I'll have dig into the data on foods that I've got to seek out non-carb high calorie foods.
    As far as I know I've not had a C peptide test but I'll raise this with my GP when I have my next review in February.
     
  6. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    @miahara - I did a quick BMI calculation, using the NHS calculator, which does indeed give you an underweight BMI, but only by about 1kg. I'm sure you looks very slight, as I myself skirt around the margins of underweight/healthy weight all the time. I weigh myself every morning, not to ensure my weight stays down, but to make sure I don't drop any more.

    A year or so ago, when I had some surgery (not diabetes related) I lost 3kg which took me months to regain, for a number of reasons, so I do understand your plight.

    When I was in (happily) losing mode, it took ages to even out my weight loss, which I did by a combination of increased portion sizes (of everything, but mainly protein), adding in more nuts and upping my fat intake, so when I need to gain weight I just repeat that exercise, but make sure I really up the nuts and fats.

    To be honest, it's a pain, because during that gaining period, I am eating more than I really want to, but have accepted that it has to be done, and better done to gain small amounts than have a bigger mountain to climb, if I don't nip downward trends in the bud.

    I have accepted that I'm light these days, and having maintained around this weight for a good couple of years, folks no longer comment on how slight I am - even those I don't see too often.

    It's your call how you address the issue, but it makes sense to take it steady, or there's potential for gastric upsets.
     
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  7. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am a skinny type 2 and I can fully agree that it is hard work trying to gain weight or even maintain the weight that you have ! I make sure that I eat plenty of good fats for example I have an avocado every morning ,cheese and nuts as mid. meal.snacks and full fat yoghurt with Jersey double cream for pudding most days .I put lots of butter on my veg I am 6 stone 9 and just 5 foot but it is onward and upwards !! I have started to post on the weekly weigh in on Fridays thread so if you join in we could encourage one another
    CAROL
     
  8. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @carty and @AndBreathe for the encouragement and suggestions. I'll try upping my fats intake and see what happens.

    Dave
     
  9. psignathus

    psignathus Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The way I see it you can allow your body to set its own weight albeit in your case a little low. Or you can increase cheese and nuts etc. but you may be in danger of making yourself miserable in the process. Especially if your eating when you really don't want to. good luck with whatever you decide.
     
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  10. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Whilst I sort of agree with you, but in may case, I also had to consider things like buying clothes. I'm now a size 6 (average UK size is something like 16, I think), which is petite enough to be a tricky at times. Yes, I can also buy some girls clothing (like jeans or t-shirts), but I'm a lady of a certain age who wants to dress like an adult.

    Slim is good. Slight is convenient in tight places. But a rack of ribs permanently on view, and no backside isn't necessarily the best look.

    We all have to decide what we will do to achieve what we want. Most folks on here would not have changed their way of eating had they not been diagnosed, so those of us who have a "Part 2" where we have to do additional tweaks just have to either get on with it, or get skinnier and skinnier. There is a point at which ultra skinny isn't healthy.
     
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  11. psignathus

    psignathus Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't agree more but at some point we need to give ourselves time to 'acclimatize' to our new way of beeing. Relax into our new bodies and accept ourselves for who we are not what we are perceived by others to be. We are so much more than what people see and what we eat.
     
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  12. pete254

    pete254 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, on diagnosis 3 years ago I had a BMI of 22 but after eating healthily and regular exercise my BMI has dropped to 18.8. I now weigh myself every day to make sure I don't go any lower. I am 5' 11" and 134 lbs.
    If I have to eat more to keep my weight up my go to food is salmon (tinned, smoked or fresh).
    Funnily enough takeaway curries & chocolate don't have any effect on my weight (shame about the diabetes stopping me gorging on them!).
     
  13. DeejayR

    DeejayR Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I go along with @psignathus 's idea that the body acclimatizes itself and I have to give it time to do that. About a year, in my case. Regardless of what I eat (usually a lot) or of how much fat (always a lot) or how much exercise (little in winter, quite a lot in summer) my weight is constant (I'm thin). However, I don't feel hungry any more as I used to when I craved carbs. But I do feel satisfied after meals. So I would ask @miahara : Do you need to put on weight to enable you to do something you can't do now? If I want to add weight for exercise, I just go food shopping with a rucksack. Etc.
     
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  14. Slalom

    Slalom Type 2 · Member

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    yes my BMI peaked at 21.6 after Christmas. I finf weight difficult to put on but I exercise a lot cycled 3679 and hiked 693 Miles in 2016, so I can loose weight quickly if I don't add calories.
     
  15. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Like @AndBreathe I don't find size zero a good look for a lady of my maturity ( I have been drawing my OAP for over 10 years ) !My limbs are like twiglets with wrinkles ,never mind I am happy and my BGS are under control
    CAROL
     
  16. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No I'm reasonably fit but I think I could do with an extra couple of kilos. I'll probably put on a bit come Spring when I get back into some regular heavy duty gardening and build up muscle a bit.
     
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  17. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Psignathus - I have very often written on threads suggesting onlookers/family/whomever often comments on the change from a differing standpoint from our own. Their comments may be based on concern (not all weight loss is a positive health marker), curiosity, an inability to reconcile the new image with the person they know, or even envy. What matters is how the individual actually feels.

    I have also posted that our bodies don't lose in aesthetically convenient places - particularly where the loss is swift, and some bodies take a while (months) to "smooth out" following loss to achieve a more normalised shape and image.

    The difference here is the OP of this thread is actually, albeit marginally, in the BMI underweight zone. I totally accept that the BMI scale isn't an absolute measure of appropriate weight for any given individual, but my feeling is the OP would prefer to gain a little. As someone who has been through the same process (mainly after surgery), I shared my experience.

    Every one of us needs to decide, within the parameters of our physiological condition, where we draw the line on our weightloss. For some, weightloss just grinds to a halt when whatever the individual is eating is balanced with their body's requirements. For those for whom that doesn't happen, they have to take stabilising action, if not remedial action. Indeed, one of my most often repeated pieces of advice for those nearing their target weight/image, is not to wait until they reach their target to start taking balancing action, or they may overshoot.

    I'm not suggesting I'm a martyr to anything, including maintaining my weight, all I am saying is that for some it can be a challenge, coupled with our underlying blood glucose challenge. I live a happy, mainly contented life and consider myself very fortunate with where my body has ended up. It seems to have recovered well from it's condition at diagnosis, as illustrated by my metabolic and other physiological markers.
     
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  18. Sean01

    Sean01 · Guest

    Hi. I have spent most of my adult life trying to put on weight - I'm very good at it! I was big for my age at the age of 11 - about six stone - great news on a rugby pitch and pretty much stayed big throughout school. I left at the age of 18 a 10.5 stoine weakling (in my eyes) and in my year off before uni, managed to gain three stone. It would have been more but the week before starting uni I caught a bug. I was a competitive body builder - old school - we believed in bulking up between contests and then drasticly loosing weight for competitions - so lots of experience in gaining and loosing.

    As you get older (I'm in my 50's now, gaining and loosing becomes harder. I lost a lot in my first year of being diagnosed (T2) mainly due to cutting out carbs, but I need to get some muscle back. I don't know if there are other ways, but weights and protein work for me and by weights I mean proper old style strength training - look for a specialist weightlifting/strength club rather than a fitness club. I train at a place called Like2Lift - you can find them on facebook - simply to give you an idea of the disticntion between weightlifting and fitness training. Don't get my wrong - I train for fitness. My blood pressure has come right down and I have been able to halve my meds and my resting heart beat is around 60 bpm, but at the same time I am within a few pounds of leg pressing 1,000 lbs - my strongest ever after 40 years of weight lifting. It helps me control the blood sugar and makes me feel good. Having strong legs is also useful for all that walking and the protein - I practically live of eggs (90 a week) and sardines with a huge bag of spinach each day and some garlic and tomatoes. It's not for everybody - but putting on muscle can be done (and you don't have to lift my weights - everything is relative and trust me, 1,000 lb is nothing special in a gym with national champions and strong man athletes so in summary - muscles will grow if stimulated to work hard and fed lots of protein - but obviously watch the carbs - and one last thing - I'm not a doctor - before you do anything close to what I do seek medical advice and speak to a proper strength conditioning coach - preferably one built like a brick out house - they tend to know what they are talking about.
     
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  19. JAD337

    JAD337 · Member

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    Hi, yes, I am an underweight T2 and glad to hear there are a few more out there.
    I was diagnosed in January 2004, aged 52. I am 6ft 1in and my weight had dropped from just over 11 stone to just under 10. I had never been overweight in my life.
    My diabetes has taken turns for the worse over the years, and each time I lost more weight. I exercise quite a bit and I guess my body was using body fat for energy because my lack of insulin was preventing my food intake from providing enough energy. I got very frustrated, eating just raised my blood sugars. In 2008 a very perceptive specialist nurse put me on Lantus insulin and immediately things improved, but by now I was under 10st 7lb. I carried on for a few more years with my weight not changing and then took another downward turn. My weight dropped to under 10 stone and my hba1c rose to unacceptable levels. A year ago I had Novo Rapid fast acting insulin added in to the mix and hey presto, I have control of my hba1c again and my weight has crept back to over 10 stone during the last year.
    Since my initial diagnosis I have tried to keep to a well-balanced diet, eating most things except anything with a "high" sugar content (define "high"!!). I haven't really changed that approach now I am on fast acting insulin. Just on odd occasions I will have a modest sweet with a meal and compensate with a higher dose injection.
    So for me, my weight loss was down to my body drawing on body fat to support my exercise levels, making up for the lack of energy coming from my food intake. Once I was prescribed insulin, that trend reversed, although I am still nowhere near my original weight in 2004. However, I think I have now left the "underweight" classification.
    Great fun eh? Best of luck to you.
     
  20. Cap'n M

    Cap'n M Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member
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    There's no such condition as "underweight type 2". You are insulin deficient, not insulin resistant. The classification is ********. Tests for c-peptide & GAD are expensive and the NHS tends to sidestep them. Insulin is needed to recover muscle bulk and strength.
     
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