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Apple cider vinegar

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by Sapien, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. Sapien

    Sapien Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone here with pre-diabetes had success in using apple cider vinegar to consistently lower fasting morning blood sugar (and the dawn phenomenon)? If yes, how big was the effect? Same question for post-prandial blood sugar.
     
  2. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a capful of apple cider vinegar consistently with my breakfast. Does it help? Who knows. (I hope it does.)
     
  3. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    No idea. But I'm a T2 who just had a steroid shot a few days ago, and normally that'd make my numbers go up 4 mmol/l for about 48 hours or so. Now just 1 mmol/l. And the vinegar's the only thing that's different from the last shot, so... Nothing definitive, but too big a difference to be a coincidence, I think.
     
  4. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have used ACV in the past. Can’t say I ever really saw a marked drop in fasting glucose, but that’s not to say it doesn’t help others. There are other purported benefits though.
     
  5. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I tried it out a a couple of years ago, then my GP phoned me at home and told me stop using it because it could interfere with the Digoxin heart medication I take.

     
  6. Sapien

    Sapien Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Good to know that apple cider vinegar can reduce potassium. It is important to have enough potassium and many people are deficient so adding ACV daily may not be so helpful (unless one adds extra potassium).
     
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  7. AloeSvea

    AloeSvea Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    ACV has definitely been involved in studies (which I can copy and paste links to if anyone is interested?), and the jury is on the side that it does affect post-eating BG levels in a good way, at least for type two. Not just apple cider vinegar, but all vinegars (I believe ACV is the most palatable of them, is all). (Apples - yum! What a shame they are so high in carbs.)

    It can be used in particular, is my understanding in the event you do eat a high carb meal - both by having it beforehand, and/or afterwards, in order to help your body deal with the carbs. How you take it also seems to be relevant (ie - pills or the liquid), as in taking the liquid vinegar as a 'wholefood' then, being more effective. (I tried supplements myself, and they had zero affect, so I was not surprised by that information, wherever I read it.)

    I have also read that they think the often amazing positive affect of vinegars (all vinegars) on our metabolism is to do with gut biome health, and our general metabolic health (in that we are helped and aided by the biota in our digestive systems to actually deal with the food we eat in a healthy fashion, so for us - it's in insulin and blood glucose regulation in a high carb food environment).

    Vinegars, apparently, emulate the affect of eating other animals' stomach and digestive tract contents, which we arguably do not do to the same extent, if at all, anymore, but used to do - well - heaps! This enters the realm of ancestral food and evolutionary biology which I am very interested in, but is not everyone's bag.
     
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  8. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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