1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

"Best" things doctors have said to you

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by tigger, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. kjjames1972

    kjjames1972 Family member · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yup, welcome to my world of falling over and/or walking into doors ...
     
    • Like Like x 2
  2. Blue_Star

    Blue_Star Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    33
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. bumblebee95

    bumblebee95 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    73
    I ended up having a liver problem but even that was half-diagnosed
     
  4. clareb1970

    clareb1970 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    78
    I think you should remember that this Dr was a stand in who did not work at your hospital. There is a high chance he/she will not have had chance to read yours or anyone else’s notes prior to the start of the clinic. No doubt the Dr was dragged in at the last minute, without being briefed on the general routine of the clinic.

    The Dr did ask if you had any questions and did not feed you inaccurate info (out of interest, why did you need to know the exact date of diagnosis?). My experience of attending a lot of busy clinics is that they tend to run only on the basis that regular staff are used to their own routine, rather than following a process.
     
  5. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,717
    Likes Received:
    5,225
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I was in DKA and as yet undiagnosed. It was 3 days before Christmas and I’d been unable to get up and down stairs unless I slid down on my bum or climbed on my hands and knees for a few days now.
    I was finding breathing very difficult.

    GP. There are three things you could have, epilepsy, pneumonia or diabetes. We need to do some tests. Will you still be here after Christmas?
     
    • Funny Funny x 5
    • Like Like x 1
  6. andi140373

    andi140373 Type 1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    36
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Two spring to mind.
    My Mum took me to the doctors the day after my 15th birthday because all I did was sleep and drink. Doctor did a glucose test with the result saying 'reading too high for machine' (or similar). He looked at me and said 'you should be dead young lady! Mum fainted and banged her head. Result - both of us carted off to hospital.

    Second one was a medicine review at a new surgery. Similar to this has happened before as well
    Dr: I don't understand why you don't have a long acting insulin on your repeat prescription
    Me: I am on a pump so don't need one
    Dr: What are you talking about, of course you do. Your morning readings must be so high
    Me: No, they are usually between 4 and 5.
    Dr: You must have a faulty test kit
    Me: No, I am on a pump. It continually drip feeds novorapid into me
    Dr: Yes, but what about your long acting insulin?
    Me: I don't need it
    Dr: Of course you do. You are type 1 aren't you?
    Me: Yes - I have been for 25 years and I am on an insulin pump.
    Dr: I am going to change your prescription. You have used lantus and levimir in the past. Which worked best for you?
    Me: I will make another appointment with someone who understands insulin pumps
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Funny Funny x 3
  7. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    Trophy Points:
    198
    GP upon my exciedly announcing my first type 1 pregnancy:

    Ohhhh. Don't get too excited. Lots of things can go very wrong with your condition....Cue immediate deflation on my part as my pregnancy got medicalised.

    My personal bug bear though is to be asked IS IT WELL CONTROLLED?

    Answer - today maybe, not sure about tomorrow or last week!

    Btw saw a great You Tube clip for type 1s featuring UK GP Dr Ian Lake who is a type 1 himself (see Public Health Collaboration ). There is hope! We can opt out of doctor interactions as much as possible or try some education.
     
  8. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,005
    Likes Received:
    14,072
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I would like hear more of this from my GP, "We will bulk bill this procedure".
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. jadeashton24

    jadeashton24 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    78


    Sort of similar to a situation I had. I went to the young adults diabetic clinic (for the first time after seeing paediatric team previously) the doctor repeated called me by another name (I think it was Lauren I just remember it began with an L) told me he was taking my insulin away as I ‘no longer had diabetes’ I stormed out of that appointment as he was convinced I was called Lauren (or whatever name it was) fast forward three weeks down the line, turns out the doctor had been struck off...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. SueJB

    SueJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,248
    Likes Received:
    4,009
    Trophy Points:
    198
    How on earth did you not thump anyone? Magic self control,I certainly wouldn't have been able to contain myself
     
  11. Seacrow

    Seacrow LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    393
    Likes Received:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    63
    My first visit to a consultant. She had my notes in front of her which said 'severely clinically depressed with previous suicide attempts'. She started out by saying I wasn't being careful enough with my insulin. Just one syringe full into a vein, and I would quickly fall into a completely painless coma and die. I stuttered and said 'have you seen my notes'. She then said 'emotional blackmail won't work with me' and looked surprised as I stood up and walked out.

    I did write to the hospital management suggesting that telling suicidal patients how to easily and painlessly kill themselves was possibly not good medical practice. They responded and told me I was free to go to a different hospital.
     
    • Hug Hug x 3
  12. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    1,061
    Trophy Points:
    198
    A view from atype 2
    I was in hospital and a surgeon was talking to a relative at my bedside about me ( after all I was only a patient, so why should he talk to me?) he proceeded to tell my realtive
    “Diabetic feet are just like bars of chocolate. You promise yourself that you’ll only have one bite, but once youve started you cant stop and you just keep coming back for more”
    The surgeons surname rhymed with anchor - I was very pleased to find out what the nurses called him!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    1,414
    Trophy Points:
    158
    He does sounds like a right anchor!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    428
    Likes Received:
    141
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I am still going to be thinking about that in a year.
     
  15. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    691
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Trophy Points:
    178
    It is scary really. With my situation "Bernard" who was in the ward with me and who was really struggling. His family kept bringing him chocolates and take outs against the fury of the nurses and Drs (none of them had any idea whatsoever) was actually discharged a couple of days early as they mistook him for me!.. And later I came to realise I should have been discharged sooner... Absolute lunacy!..

    My lot should really have got into serious trouble but they actually got away with it.. Maybe that's why the Nurses let me stay up late one night to watch "Jaws" with them! Ha... I often wonder how Bernard is doing!

    Hoping all's ok with you Jade and that things aren't too bad..
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    850
    Likes Received:
    483
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Great thread! I've only been diagnosed 6 months and my favourite so far....
    Visit A&E with suspected broken rib. Write on the admission form that I was diagnosed T1D in that department 10 weeks prior. Triage nurse crosses out T1 and scribbled T2 over it. When I correct her she tells me I'm much too old for T1 so I am wrong. Me: no, definitely T1 I'm even showing positive on 2 antibody tests. Her: well what medication are you taking then? Me: well I've written it on the form it's lantus and novorapid. Her: you'd be taking insulin if you were T1. Me: they ARE insulin!

    In the run up to diagnosis my GP had assumed I was type 2 and gave me tablets and told me to test my BG over the next few days. BG kept rising so I phoned surgery only to be told by one of the GPs that she didn't 'do diabetics' so I needed to wait until Wed until one of her colleagues was in. A&E 48 hours later....
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
  17. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    374
    Trophy Points:
    123
    As they say in the business; SAMARI SURGERY!
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  18. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    1,061
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I had the reverse thing re age!
    I was diagnosed when I was admitted to hospital with a raging infection ( gp screw up) and bs of 28. I was put on an insulin pump ( quite a big bit of kit that sat on a trolley behind my bed and had to come walkies with me whenever I went to the loo etc)
    When sugers were at a better level a member of the diabetes team came and said “ Im going to prescribe you insulin and needles and youll be injecting for the rest of your life”. I asked her why some of the nurses had said I might manage on tablets or diet to which she replied “ thats stupid, thatll never work at your age, you’re only in your 20’s”
    I think she was a bit confused when I pointed out I was actually going to be 40 in a few weeks as her first response was to ask me if I was sure! then after she’d checked my date of birth she said shed prescribe some tablets (Gliclazide as it turned out) and come back in a week to see how I was getting on - never saw her again and 21 years later Im on the same meds at the same dose, albeit with a carb tolerance that has gone from around 35g per meal to aroud et-50g a day
     
    #198 Boo1979, Mar 2, 2018 at 10:44 AM
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2018
  19. Hoppy59

    Hoppy59 Type 1 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I had that too! Was told I wouldn't live to see 40! Must have been the same consultant!!!
     
  20. Dodo

    Dodo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    320
    Trophy Points:
    123
    Not good when they get patients mixed up. It was years ago now when I was admitted to hospital because I was going to be induced. I was put in my own room and when the sister came to register my details she called me a liar when I replied that my husband was my next of kin. She informed me that I wasn't married and wanted my father's name. Then I was given a physical examination that was more like torture. By the time my husband got there I was a nervous wreck and in tears. It seems they had mixed me up with a girl who was bought in from a nearby prison to have her baby. My consultant soon had me moved to the ward I should have been in. The 'prisoner' later absconded before giving birth and took money and jewellery from other patients on her way out, wearing just her nightie, dressing gown and slippers.

    Then two weeks later, after giving birth, I was mistaken for another diabetic lady. We were testing our own urine and noting our records. She was showing high sugars whereas mine were good. The nurse had mixed our notes up and my consultant wanted to give me a large insulin dose. When I explained the mistake he threatened to have the nurse thrown out of the hospital because of the possible consequences.

    Always worried now about being admitted to hospital as twice in less than three weeks was scary.
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook