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Breastfeeding

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by pawprints, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. pawprints

    pawprints Type 1 · Member

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    Hi, I'm type 1 diabetic and I'm currently 29 weeks pregnant. I was wondering how many of you had breast fed and what your experience was like? Ive heard you have many hypos and I'm worried what this may have on my health. I can't seem to find any breast feeding groups in my local area never mind diabetic mother's. It is something I would really like to do but would like to speak to others who have been through it.
     
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  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Pawprints, I'll tag my colleague, @Juicyj . I know she had gestational diabetes, then was diagnosed T1, but I'm ashamed to say I'm not utterly clear in my head if there was a gap in the two.

    JuicyJ, apologies if I misremember.

    I'll tag in @Diakat too. As Mums who now have T1, they may well know of others' experiences.
     
  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @DCUKMod My gestational went once daughter popped out so didn't have to deal with hypos and breast feeding.

    The best advice I can offer is to simply keep a close eye on your levels and monitor the effect of feeds, you need to ensure you are eating enough carbs to sustain milk supply, am sure your DSN can give you some guidance on this and perhaps even offer a Libre to help you monitor this without stopping to test so often.
     
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  4. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    I did indeed breastfeed and yes as the baby is using a fair few carbs things can be interesting. My nurse did occasionally mutter ‘just eat some cake’ at me! Anyway, as @DCUKMod says monitor a lot, have food close at hand and overall enjoy it as much as you can. It’s super for bonding with your baby and I totally believe it is great for their health. Perhaps ask for Libre while feeding so you can easily swipe while feeding and have food/sweet drinks within reach.
     
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  5. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    I think it was @Juicyj who knew what she was talking about. :)
     
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  6. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    @Juicyj apologies, it was you who knows to monitor and carb up.
     
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  7. pawprints

    pawprints Type 1 · Member

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    Thanks ladies. How much would you say you snacked? Before every feed? During? And after? I'm on a dexcom as have no hypo awareness any more so that makes things a bit easier. Just worried it's going to be a nightmare if want to take baby out, breast feed and eat ect.

    Emma
     
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  8. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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  9. FingersCrossed

    FingersCrossed · Active Member

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    Hi there,

    I breastfed my son for a year (five years ago) and I'm currently still exclusively feeding my almost-five-month old baby girl. I had loads of hypos both times for the first six weeks or so, but since that initial spell, I rarely have any now as things just settle down. I'm type 1, on a pump, with Libre. My bedside table was full of cartons of orange juice, cereal bars, water and Infacol those first few weeks, but it's so worth it. I can't remember how often I snacked, but I'd say through the night was probably when I needed more carbs. I love the flexibility it gives me, and as I bought a breastfeeding cover (personal preference), I feel totally relaxed to feed her anywhere (bus stop, a castle ruin - ha ha - cafes, and once when I was walking as I had to get somewhere quickly). If you can get through the first hard-going weeks, it is - in my opinion - much easier and convenient, but each to their own and you have to do what's right for you.

    Best of luck.
     
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  10. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I had hypo's when breastfeeding my daughter and as other's have said, keep testing and have food and drinks close by at home in different rooms and in your bag when out and about. Enjoy every minutes as they grow up so fast, take care.
    Edtred, many congratulations :)
     
  11. JossB

    JossB Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi Pawprints. Congratulations!
    Your midwife/health visitor will know more about local breastfeeding groups - I didn’t see mine much until after baby came so you might want to phone and ask in advance if it’s the same for you.
    I have T1 and breastfed my baby. Initially things were hard, but I’m still breastfeeding 2 years later so it’s definitely possible! As others have said, everyone is different but hypos are common. My insulin needs raised dramatically during pregnancy and then plummeted immediately after, so it takes a bit of getting used to. As long as you are prepared it should be fine (have lots of snacks and things to treat hypos within reach and be prepared that you might need more carb than you usually would to treat it). The worst times were when I became aware I was having a hypo just as baby wanted a feed, it goes against your motherly instinct not to respond to baby immediately!
    It can sometimes take longer for your milk to come in (mine certainly took a long time but I had a c section which doesn’t help) and you might find that baby’s blood sugar will drop and the midwives might suggest formula. Don’t let it put you off, it’s entirely possible to exclusively breastfeed but it’s also possible to combination feed - you need to do what’s right for you so don’t let anyone make you feel guilty.
    I found that it was hard not having anyone to talk to about what I was experiencing so get in touch and ask/rant/bask in the baby glow as often as you like.
    Enjoy the amazing experience!
     
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  12. JaneWorlock

    JaneWorlock · Newbie

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    I'm a T1 diabetic and found no one there to help. I had lots of hypos, the trouble is I couldn't tell how much they had actually fed, and I just kept being told to eat more, but then I found that I would go high. Basically I had to check more frequently and in the end I breast fed at night and when someone was there and bottle fed by day when on my own with the baby. The experts said it wouldn't work and I'd end up failing. Instead of which my body adapted (eventually I stopped breast feeling by day) so I had plenty of milk in the evenings and through the night but didn't leak much by day. I did try to get on as a breast advisor as I couldn't find anyone able to really understand. However I stopped breast feeding when my youngest was 5.5 months but you have to breast feed until you reach 6 months to become an advisor!

    I a glad I did it as long as I did, and it was a palaver but it was wonderful to have that closeness with my sons. Mixing the two methods of feeding was the best for me. You just have to work with what you have. I also lost my warning symptoms whilst pregnant, these did return but not for a few months so that really didn't make it any easier.

    I've now got 2 university students who are wonderful, it was definitely worth it all. I really enjoyed breast feeding them but it was very difficult but not impossible.

    Wishing you lots of luck
     
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  13. pawprints

    pawprints Type 1 · Member

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    Thanks so much everyone. It's so great to hear your stories and feel alot more confident in giving it a try. I know it will be hard but it's also an amazing opportunity. I will see if I can find any local groups in my area. It's lovely to hear diabetic experiences rather than just some one who isn't living with this condition. I appreciate every single one of your comments so thanks again.

    Emma x
     
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  14. Jan(I love Goldies)

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    Hi Pawprints, I am T1 and had twins that I breast fed for seven months. Not easy but definitely possible. At every feed I settled down with a drink and something to eat and my testing kit of course. The first few weeks are always tricky but I wish you every success whether you bottle or breast feed.
     
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  15. ealingr

    ealingr Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    La Leche League also have some specific information on breastfeeding with diabetes:

    https://www.laleche.org.uk/diabetes-and-breastfeeding/

    While it can be a bit of a juggling act at first, I think the changes in insulin requirements due to no longer being pregnant/hormones and trying to function on not a lot of sleep make that time challenging whether breastfeeding or bottle-feeding! :)

    Agree with what others have said about keeping a good supply of snacks you can eat one-handed close by. Also the comments about treating a hypo taking priority over feeding baby - if there's nobody with you, making sure you treat your hypo first (even if it means baby cries for a minute) is definitely in both of your interests.

    Good luck. :)
     
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