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Approved Can I get you guys to take a survey about cereal dust?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Research' started by Swinerat, Oct 23, 2015.

  1. Exactly! Who is going to be judge and jury over what is a small piece of cereal and what is dust?

    When I eat a bag of peanuts, the salty dust at the bottom is the best bit. I hope nobody is currently engineering a device to remove this dust :nailbiting:
     
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  2. Crikey! I am glad I don't eat cereals. Sounds quite hazardous lol
     
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  3. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Agreed :)

    @Jaylee, I've yet to receive a plastic toy in the packaging, if I do I'll send it your way ;)
     
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  4. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Yes please. It's the only thing I don't need to worry about bolusing for! ;)
     
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  5. seadragon

    seadragon Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    When I used to eat cereal (Frosties!) I loved the sugary dust at the bottom - best bit. After learning I had predicable yes I'd never eat cereal again. I imagine it's irelevant for most diabetics as they wouldn't eat such cereal and irelevant for non diabetics as it wouldn't matter to them.
     
  6. DeejayR

    DeejayR Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @Swinerat Trying to be positive, Mrs DeeJay says could your group design a small lightweight non-metal device with enough leverage to open the plastic screw-on tops on her fruit juice cartons please? We have a mutli-fit set of metal jaws which is fine for jamjars but too cumbersome for small twist tops. Pliers are too bulky, she says.
    PS Also an attachment for getting the plastic ringpull out when you've unscrewed the top.
     
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  7. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Aint that Tony the Tiger's dandruff?:eek:
     
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  8. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've had a long debate with myself today, I will never look at All Bran in the same light ever again.
    I weighed out 20g of All Bran which I then meticulously ground into a dust. I then weighed it again and to my whole families amazement it still weighed 20g

    From this we had to deduce that every time I am weighing the 20g of Alll Bran in order to work out its sugar content, I am also taking into account the airborne cereal dust weight as well.

    I have asked my MENSA brother to check out my findings and he looked at me as if I had gone out with the fairies. I was hoping that I had found a new marketing ploy, by grinding everything to dust I can double the amount I have,

    So the fact of the matter is there is no need for a tool to filter out cereal dust. Perhaps the interested party could take their idea onto the next episode of Dragons Den. I will tune in with an open mind !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
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    #28 martsnow, Oct 25, 2015 at 7:41 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 25, 2015
  9. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    II think our inventor will be remaining down the job centre for a while having read this thread.
    Sorry mate but I'm out.
     
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  10. martsnow

    martsnow Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've just had a terrible thought about my 20g of All Bran dust !!!
    I think I need to dispose of it safety after Googling the following

    Dust Explosion Hazards.
    I am at my wits end and have decided that Nuclear Containment is the only answer

    2. Dust explosion hazards
    2.1 A dust cloud of any combustible material will explode where:

    1. the concentration of dust in air falls within the explosion limits; and
    2. a source of ignition of the required energy is present.
    Containment is not always required for people to be injured and property damaged.

    Substances capable of explosion
    2.2 Examples of explosible dusts in the food industries include materials such as: flour, custard powder, instant coffee, sugar, dried milk, potato powder and soup powder.Powdered All Bran

    2.3 If a solid substance is finely ground it may ignite more readily or at a lower energy. If any combustible substance is mixed or suspended in air at the correct concentrations and contained in a vessel or building when ignition occurs, then a violent explosion can result. If it is uncontained then a fireball may occur. The typical concentration ranges that can give rise to an explosion are low (75- >1000 g/m3 of air). As a guide, at these lower concentrations it is difficult for an observer to distinguish solid shapes at distances of 60cm or less.

    Explosions can occur (and may propagate) within a range of concentrations between values known as the lower and upper explosion limits.

    2.4 Ignition energies vary with different substances and for similar substances with differing moisture content and particle size, but may be as low as the static discharge experienced when taking off a synthetic fibre jumper, or as high as that from a ‘fixed flame’ such as a gas fired boiler.

    2.5 Common processes generating explosible dusts in the food industry include flour and provender milling, sugar grinding, All Bran Grinding, spray drying of milk and instant coffee and conveyance/storage of whole grains and finely divided materials.
     
    #30 martsnow, Oct 25, 2015 at 9:02 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 25, 2015
  11. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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  12. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    Now dust in chicken feed is a pain ... but still would not purchase anything to reduce or remove it... (NO I don't eat chicken feed .. my hens do :bag:)
     
  13. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why would anyone want such a thing adding to the cost of their grub?
     
  14. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well
    if you garden they make really good seed starters in that you can fill em with soil and then plant in them.
     
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  15. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
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    well I haven't bothered with the questionaire as I don't eat cereal but this is one of the funniest threads I have ever read on this forum.

    Proves you have to have a great sense of humour if you have D -LOL :D
     
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  16. Blackers183

    Blackers183 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Getting 'rid' of cereal dust would make keeping the kitchen clean easier. I have 55gms AllBran each morning which I store in a plastic container, however whenever I open a new box and put that into the plastic container there is a fine dust left over from the bag that usually ends up on the kitchen bench despite my many attempts to find ways not the spread it!
     
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