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Can someone provide a link to the 50 Shades of Diabetes graphic?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Winnie53, May 21, 2017.

  1. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    Can someone provide a link to the 50 Shades of Diabetes graphic? I saw it for the first time today. It's great!

    I was able to find it on Twitter but not on this website. I want to post it at work and include it in the diabetes information packet I'm putting together for new members of our local education, support, and walking diabetes group. Many thanks!
     
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  2. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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  3. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    Yes Jaylee, that's the graphic. I've saved the graphic in two different formats. Thank you. :)

    I'm hoping for a link to the graphic on this website too, perhaps with an explanation of what HbA1c (IFCC), HbA1c (DCCT), mg/dL, and mmol/L means. Does it exist?

    For example, I'm assuming that HbA1c (DCCT) is what we use in the US, and that HbA1c (IFCC) is what you all use in the UK.

    Thanks again!

    [Edited to add]: I'd also like an explanation as to how the mg/dL and mmol/L relates to the HbA1c. I'm assuming it is the calculated average glucose level, but not sure. I suppose it alternately be the calculated fasting glucose level.
     
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    #3 Winnie53, May 21, 2017 at 7:42 PM
    Last edited: May 21, 2017
  4. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    @Freema thanks for posting this graphic on another topic today. It was the first time I'd seen it. :)
     
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  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    somebody else posted it for me long time ago, but I dont know the original link , I just took a copy as I was really excited when I first saw it too
     
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  6. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My head spins when I see an Excel style spreadsheet with lots of numbers, rows and columns. The picture below makes a lot more sense to me. Sorry, can't translate it into American measures.

    hba1c-chart.jpg
     
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  7. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    @Scott-C thanks for the second graphic. The two together provide a more complete overview.

    In the first graphic, those of you in the UK and elsewhere use the first number (HbA1c - IFCC) and fourth number (blood glucose in mmol/L).

    Those of us in the USA use the second number (HbA1c - DCCT) and third number (blood glucose in mg/dL).

    Americans can easily convert the numbers in the second graphic using the first graphic (or use the converters in the two links below).

    For Americans, some of the conversion work is already done in the second graphic: an HbA1c (IFCC) of 31 mmol/mol (represented in blue for the UK and elsewhere) is already converted to an HbA1c (DCCT) of 5% (represented in white for the USA). In addition, there's a "HbA1c Units Converter - DCCT to IFCC" here... http://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-units-converter.html

    However, Americans will still have to convert the blood glucose level at the bottom of the second graphic of 5.4 (mmol/L) to 97 (mg/dL) using first graphic. Or use this "Blood Sugar Converter" here...
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/blood-sugar-converter.html

    Here's the blood glucose levels converted from UK and elsewhere (mmol/L) to USA (mg/dL)

    5.4 mmol/L is 97.2 mg/dL
    7.0 mmol/L is 126 mg/dL
    8.6 mmol/L is 154.8 mg/dL
    10.2 mmol/L is 183.6 mg/dL
    11.8 mmol/L is 212.4 mg/dL
    13.4 mmol/L is 241.2 mg/dL
    14.9 mmol/L is 269 mg/dL
    16.9 mmol/L is 297 mg/dL

    Hope this helps Americans trying to understand these two graphics.
     
    #7 Winnie53, Aug 14, 2017 at 9:24 PM
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2017
  8. hooha

    hooha Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Winnie 53 you can google more info quite easily, The IFCC is the one commonly used in UK and is considered the new way to quote it. DCCT is in percentage. The way to report HbA1c was standardised throughout the world, there are ' hundreds 'of different ways to measure it - so I read somewhere- and mg/dL is the USA method of measuring blood sugar BS levels eg. post prandial or fasting . To get to mmol/L , the UK way, divide by 18 ..eg just diabetic is 126 mg/dL which is 7 mmol/L UK style.
    I prefer the mg/dL as it is easy to remember, below 100 mg/dL FBS normal, above 125 mg/dL diabetic.
    google
    https://www.researchgate.net/public...standardised_HbA1c_Should_the_world_be_as_one
     
  9. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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  10. hooha

    hooha Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just a point on units. Blood sugar is measured in mmol/litre OR American standard in mg/ decilitre eg mg/dL. BUT
    A1c, confusingly is in percentage, Or UK standard in mmol/ MOLE eg mmol/ mol.
    The important range of Prediabetes is EASY to remember like this ( These numbers I give now are not exact BUT all these numbers are only Guides anyway.)
    To remember I use PREDIABETES is from 38 - 48 mmol/ mol OR in USA standard from 5.6% -- 6.5%. Some would say predb starts at 5.7% or 39, but I like my nmemonic trick , and I can ALWAYS check online if I'm on the margins of these numbers.
    Some might say anything above 5% is to be avoided. That is super strict ,like Dr Bernstein .

    It is a shocking situation that all these conflicting numbers exist. ADVICE varies to prediabetics, type 1diabetics , type 2' etc.

    I hope this helps some ppl. Personally it took me months of worry to get it clear In my mind.
    This 50 shades of Diabetes chart was a great help. Note the blood sugar levels in the chart are AVERAGE levels equated to various A1c numbers, they are NOT fasting FBS numbers.
     
  11. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The nHS and this site says 42-47 is prediabetes
    As I am now 38 and classed as non diabetic levels by my doctor, I’d personally say your boundary is too low

    but I also read that prediabetes isn’t a totally recognised condition medically by the WHO?

    And just realised the post above was responding to a very old post... oops!
     
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