1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Car insurance

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by djry, Jan 12, 2017.

  1. djry

    djry Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    21
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Hi can anyone tell me abit about car insurance when you have diabetes it's the first time I've had to insure my car since being diagnosed I'm on my dad's insurance classed as a second driver would I still have to tell the insurance company about my diabetes as I'm only classed as a named driver might sound a funny question but I need abit of help thanks
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. psignathus

    psignathus Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    201
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I'm pretty sure in the UK as long as you are diet controlled or only on oral meds then there is no need to declare
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,748
    Likes Received:
    5,107
    Trophy Points:
    178
    You should tell an insurer of all material facts, that includes diabetes. That way there is no wriggle room in the event of a claim.
    FWIW my insurer noted my condition but it did not alter the premium, but I am not on any medication that might cause a hypo
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,635
    Likes Received:
    19,638
    Trophy Points:
    278

    You just declare you have a 3 year restricted licence, the last time I insured my car they didn't want to know the details on why it was a restricted licence (it was an on-line application) so they may not ask, if the insurance company want to know more details then just tell them you are type 2 and treated by insulin.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Lazybones

    Lazybones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    326
    Trophy Points:
    123
    A similar question came up some time ago which I answered then and was rebuked in my reply. I re-checked what I had posted with the DVLA and found that I was indeed correct in my reply.
    Basically any driver, whether they are Type 1, Type 2 or whatever other Type needs to inform the DVLA that they are diabetic and also tell them what medications they are being prescribed. Generally if the medication ie: Insulin, Glicazide or whatever the medication is that lowers the B/G level and can 'POSSIBLY' induce a likely Hypo (Irrespective of whether the individual is Type 1, Type 2 or whatever) they will then be advised as to what their legal requirements are that enable them to remain driving and complying with the UK statory law.
    In general 'Diet control alone', orMefrormin medications will not cause their B/G to drop down to a Hypo level.. However in ALL instances every driver is advised to also notify their Insurance Company to the fact that they are classified as diabetic and are considered 'Safe' to continue driving as per the DVLA notification.
    Many individuals fail to notify either theDVLA and/or their Insurance Company which could under certain cercumstance i.e. an accident (not the diabetic's fault) invalidate their insurance, and Insurance Companies have been know to use this as a loophole in settling any claim.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #5 Lazybones, Jan 12, 2017 at 12:13 PM
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  6. heli2010

    heli2010 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Im in the motor trade if you have diabetes you have to notify your insurance or any insurance that you are named on if you are type 2 and controlled by diet or metformin, that is the law, there will be no change to your premium or stipulations if you are controled by any drug which can cause a hypo you will be required to test your levels prior to long journeys.
    as for the DVLA there is no need to notify them if diet controled or on metformin if you are on medication that can cause a hypo then you have to notify them and send a form in so that they can contact your doctor
    If you drive for a living HGV PCV then you have to notify them in all cases
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,981
    Likes Received:
    5,973
    Trophy Points:
    178
    This is one of those things that I think everyone should be told when they are first diagnosed. The focus is always around medication and diet but it seems to be forgotten that we do things like drive, exercise and work as well.
    There seems to be a lot of material about what to do when your child is diagnosed (like what to expect from their school) but very little about when an adult is diagnosed.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. col101

    col101 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    202
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I informed dvla and insurance that I'm T1D on insulin. Have 3 year license and no increase in premium all very straightforward.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,768
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Nope.

    The questions are always
    Do you have a condition you need to notify DVLA
    and
    Are the DVLA aware

    for private insurance


    I used to, but after being told by my insurers not to bother, I stopped.
    Check the DVLA website for conditions that apply.
     
  10. heli2010

    heli2010 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I have spoken to them on the phone much better than trying to get rules from their website
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. toscamo

    toscamo Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    23
    My diabetic nurse told me that if your diabetes is controlled by diet and/or tablets then you don't need to inform anyone. If you use insulin, then you must tell the DVLA and your insurer. I started using insulin just over 12 months ago -- the DVLA have changed my license to a 3 year one (you get a form signed by your GP, mainly to confirm that you haven't had any bad hypos) but my car insurer wasn't bothered (Direct Line) - they said that as long as I'm following doctor's advice they don;t need to know.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,768
    Trophy Points:
    178
  13. heli2010

    heli2010 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    38
  14. Lazybones

    Lazybones Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    326
    Trophy Points:
    123
    There are several medical conditions that here in the UK the driver is legally obliged to inform the DVLA of their condition and medications.
    Any form of medication that can lower Blood Glucose levels and induce a potential Hypo means that the driver is legally obliged to tell the DVLA of their condition. It dosen't matter what type of diabetes the individual has (It applies equally to both Type 1.Type 2 or whatever other Type) the criteria is if the medication can induce a potential Hypo.
    In such cases the DVLA will often ask for a Doctors approval as to the individualy chances and history over recent months/years as to wheter they have had, or are likely to experience a Hypo.
    Their licence is then either approved with basic limitations, or issued for a set period of time.
    It remains with the individual to always ensure that prior to actually driving, they ensure that their Blood Glucose level is sufficiently high so as to reduce the chance of them going Hypo whilst driving'
    The driver should take appropriate action to preven a Hypo amd cary Glucose Medications so that in the event of an unforseen Hypo occuring,, there is a remedy readily availabe to hand, together with a means of testing.
    As for vehicle insurance, many insurers simply aren't that bothered in adjusting or ammending the terms of an individuals insurance policy and often leave things as they currently are. But it is always best to inform your Insurance Company that you have diabetes, and even if they don't seem to bother by knowing this, to still get them to acknoledge IN WRITING that you have informed them.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,585
    Likes Received:
    3,768
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Not according to the government.
     
  16. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,978
    Likes Received:
    5,579
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Nevertheless, I follow the doctrine of uberrimae fidei which applies to contracts like insurance, if only to reduce the chance of them wriggling out of paying!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. psignathus

    psignathus Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Likes Received:
    201
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I am not in the habit of disclosing information I am not legally obliged to disclose. I value my privacy to much for that.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Redpete222

    Redpete222 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    43
    If you look on your licence it states you only have to tell the dvla or insurance if you are T1 or insulin dependant, it's also on the DVLA web site, I declared that I had T2 to my insurance and they tryed to add £60. To my cover but after a bit of a bust up they took it off but it is a good thing to tell them just in case you have a claim.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook