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Counselling and Diabetes?

Discussion in 'Emotional and Mental Health' started by Jess33marsh, May 22, 2014.

?

Should there be specific counselling offered to people living with diabetes?

  1. yes

    40 vote(s)
    95.2%
  2. no

    2 vote(s)
    4.8%
  1. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've got tumours on my spinal cord ... not cancerous but they cause me all manner of problems and pain .... I also have chronic arthritis in my spine and spondylolisthesisof the spine asthma diverticulawotsis that other arthritis that gives pain all over and suffer chronic pain syndrome.
    Until around eight years ago I had nowt wrong with me.
    How much counselling should I need and expect and how much education are those around me supposed to be subject to?
    I'm not wanting to pee on anyone's parade here but I honestly don't get what this need is for counselling.
     
  2. Sally66

    Sally66 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Forgive me but your response fits a very typical male perspective. My husband would agree with you. Here's the situation, here's what you can do about it so let's get on and do it. That is fine and you are entitled to deal with things as you wish but for some, probably mainly women, we need to talk about it and find reassurance when we do. Asking for counselling for this condition is a request that it is made available to those that want it. No one can force you to have it. As for employers - well lucky you - as I suspect you have never been on the receiving end of such insensitivity. Do I think employers should take on board what their employees are going through - too right I do. We are simply asking them to listen and be slightly adaptable. My brother is still in recovery from a brain abscess back in October. He works for Fujitzu. They have been fantastic. That support has made all the difference to his need to adapt his working practices and has hugely reassured his family during the bleakest times. I could be wrong but the fact that you are replying to this thread maybe shows you are actually more interested than you admit, otherwise you would have moved away from this thread by now.
     
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  3. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am interested.
    I'm not after putting anyone down.
    I'm interested in why people would need all this support.
    Maybe because I obviously don't.
    I'm not sitting here thinking I'm better than the person who does need this I'm interested as to why they think they need it.
    I suspect some people possibly many people have been led to believe they need these things when they probably don't.
    Life throws all manner of stuff at us and we can't expect counselling at every turn.
    One problem to me is that family and social and community ties have been broken or are no longer existent and that's what needs fixing not professional listeners and guides.
    Having family friends neighbours in past generations was enough.
    I'm not after being horrible to anyone.
    I genuinely think a lot of this stuff isn't needed and voted no to reflect that.
     
  4. anna29

    anna29 Type 2 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

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    Nowadays - stress and coping isn't within a pre or past war time .

    Now it is a more structured budget available ? set up .
    Counselling offered pro-offered solutions for you to consider in the
    counselling sessions .
    This enabled all to think the pro-offered options over .
    Funding is getting withdrawn and some folk have no one to turn to nowadays .

    Finding ways of how to cope and deal with things now is becoming more limited once again .
    In the war times folk were more hardier and made do without all this technology around .
    They all lived hand to mouth and believed in old lady luck in the olden days/times .

    Relate never existed in the past and couples stuck through more good and bad times .
    Since the 70's divorce rates rocketed .

    Budgets are placed sadly elsewhere where the money is seen as better placed .
    Harder to spread the cash to it all in all sectors and places .

    What amazes me using this as an example
    - is how much has been put into prisons to offer counselling to prisoners
    - some who just simply abuse this service .
    Once out of prison they repeat their offences and bounce straight back into the police
    and courts and prison systems .

    Then folk who really do need counselling have to go without it being made available to them .
     
  5. Luv Bee

    Luv Bee Type 2 · Newbie

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    I feel that some people would benefit from it - many people moving from pre-diabetic to diabetic who have sugar levels only just above normal may have time to adjust their diet and lifestyle and will find all the info available enough for them - others who suddenly find their sugar through the roof may be shocked and those who get complications too may need additional support - in my view
     
  6. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What happens to people who don't get counselling?
     
  7. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Are people confusing being educated about their condition and needing counselling?
    I don't think the people in the war years believed in lady luck any more than people before or after them.
    We're supposedly better educated now but seem to be ever more in need.
    What exactly is this counselling supposed to achieve.
    I'm asking these questions because I voted no remember.
     
  8. Sally66

    Sally66 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I presume you are arguing against counselling for people newly diagnosed with Diabetes and not against the efficacy of counselling itself? So, I take it you deem diabetes to be not such a bad thing compared to other conditions? Or are you saying all counselling is pointless?

    We have come a long way in dealing with mental health and reactive stress. Wartime "spirit" and using neighbours and family was not enough for many. Post traumatic Stress disorder is a classic example. Surely you would not deny people access to counselling for that? Surely not deny people bereavement counselling also? So what's ok for counselling and what is not in your book?

    Of course that example of PTSD is extreme and might not be on the same level as being told you have a condition that shortens your life expectancy that may lead to cardio vascular disease, loss of sight and limbs! People need support and often it is too much of a burden to place on friends and family all the time. Professional services offer a degree of objectivity, people you can speak to who are not emotionally involved with you. The fact that the Samaritans are busy 24-7 only goes to show that thousands need someone to talk to about their problems. It is nothing to do with education or information. People don't turn to the Samaritans for information! They turn to medics, books and websites for that. Many of those people have husbands, wives , friends but choose to speak to someone they don't know. This doesn't mean they don't welcome support from family, friends and employers. They need both.

    I'm glad you feel so secure and well supported that you don't feel you need counselling. Plenty do and should have the opportunity to turn to counselling services if they do. It is clear that you do get some degree of satisfaction in airing your views with complete strangers otherwise you wouldn't still be on this forum. Seems odd to me, therefore, that you are so anti counselling for everybody else when you clearly liked to be listened to yourself.
     
  9. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am not anti counselling.
    I voted no and keep asking what the yes voters would expect to get out of it.
    I come here for an education and fail to understand what that has to do with me voting no.
    What exactly do the yes voters want to talk about?
    You've said it has nothing to do with education regarding diabetes so I'm still in the dark.
    There was a choice in the poll ... yes or no.
    You seem angry that I chose no.
    No one has told me what they expect from this counselling.
    It has to be more than someone to talk to surely.
    Are people suggesting that this counselling should be available on the NHS?
    Prisons were mentioned before.
    A lot of people want to see rehab services available across the nation in all the jails.
    Most people know nothing about rehabilitating a con and the astronomical cost involved.
    Teachers psychologists psychiatrists tradesmen record keepers ... it's why it's almost none existent.
    Imagine the cost to the NHS for something like counselling for the myriad of illnesses and ailments that afflict mankind?
    For this huge expense people ... especially diabetics will get what exactly?
     
  10. hello123

    hello123 Type 1 · Member

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    I think emotional support is must for T1 rather than T2. Type 1 usually happens in younger age and demands intense attention usually a person unable to devote and is rare than type 2.
     
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  11. Sally66

    Sally66 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Just found out that Diabetes UK has a support group in my area. Meets once a month. A chance to talk to others in similar circumstances to ourselves is great. They offer "information" too. Run by volunteers. Not a drain on the public purse. Think I'll check it out. So support services do exist. JTL - I'll let you know what we talk about which appears to be a mystery to you. Look, it maybe comparing diets, experiences with different treatments, doesn't matter, it's the reassurance you get to know you are not alone. As I said before it's great that you don't need it, so let those of us who want it get on with it. The NHS is in financial meltdown and I couldn't agree more that it could do without further strain but no one said counselling had to come from their coffers.
     
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  12. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have no wish to stop others going for it Sally.
    It was a vote.
    My vote was no.
    Further discussion was inevitable otherwise it would just have been a yes no thread.
     
  13. Jess33marsh

    Jess33marsh Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sally66 I think you raise some interesting points about employment and diabetes. I think it is just one of the challenges we face. I know personally I have had a hard time explaining how living with Type 1 effects my job to those who know very little about the condition. More education about all types of diabetes in the workplace would be ideal but as JTL points out the practicality of this is another issue. I work for the NHS and there are still real gaps in knowledge about diabetes but also individuals who are not willing to listen and learn about the condition which alarms me. Just be aware of your rights as Diabetes does fall under the Disability Act. You need to check your work place policies and procedures on time off for appointments with a long standing condition/illness too. I hope you adjust to living with diabetes even if it is pre diabetes currently. This forum is a great source of support knowledge and place to share experiences..
     
  14. Jess33marsh

    Jess33marsh Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I respect JTL that you answered No to the question raised and I am pleased it has raised a debate about the subject. I would like to see counselling offered as part of the current care package offered to Diabetes. It is about choice nothing else. It maybe that a person living with diabetes never feels the need to talk to a qualified counsellor about living with the condition, however here will be people who do. This could be about any aspect of living with diabetes - depression, burnout, relationships, acceptance, physical changes, life stressors the list could go on and on. JTL - counselling could achieve and facilitate changes in behaviour and emotionally support someone. What the person wants to get out of counselling is personal to them and discussed with the counsellor - it maybe that counselling highlights areas for further education in understanding their diabetes.
     
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  15. Jess33marsh

    Jess33marsh Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Anna29 - the example you give about prisons interests me. It illustrates and supports my notion that counselling needs to be part of a holistic care package to help with all aspects of social welfare situations in society. Using offending behaviour and prolific offending as a bench mark as to whether counselling works is grossly unfair. People with a criminal record face all kinds of obstacles such as getting a job and living independently, rebuilding relationships with family members, substance misuse, homelessness and suitable and appropriate housing. I have worked with this client group and my experience is unless all organisations statutory and voluntary can work together with the resources they have to tackle the wide range of issues then counselling alone will not be enough. If counselling was part of the existing care package for Diabetes addressing not only the physical symptoms but the mental health aspect of the condition then we could start to evaluate its effectiveness.
     
  16. Sally66

    Sally66 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jess33marsh. I thought you might be interested to know the response I received from the NUT. I asked of they had any policies or guidelines for teachers with Diabetes - answer "No." Only have guidelines for teachers dealing with children with diabetes. I'm shocked to be honest. I think this only goes to show the levels of ignorance you referred to. To think they have a policy for employers on dealing with teachers going through the menopause (I'm not knocking that) but none for diabetes speaks volumes. I might explore if other teaching unions have guidelines - if they do then the NUT needs to get on with it!
     
  17. cheriah

    cheriah Friend · Newbie

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    I would say it should be part of the standard care package for all diabetics. My partner has been type1 for 14 years and currently suffering from burnout. It's awful to watch as I don't know what I can do to help and he refuses to go to the dr for help. Counseling would be a great tool for him to understand why he's feeling like this and ideas on changes he can make to help himself.
     
  18. Fayefaye1429

    Fayefaye1429 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I think JTL brings up a good point. What I hear is you asking why for people who vote yes what would it improve. There is evidence of improvement blood sugar etc but I guess the best answer is only the person going would know. I think a lot of the time its having a space, away from people you know to discuss things in a confidential arena where you can express what diabetes has been like or is for you, or the changes, mood for some its loss so the answer is hard to define
     
  19. PatsyB

    PatsyB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think if you should be unfortunate to be diagnosed with diabetes whether it be type 1 or 2 you should get counsiling, I was very upset when i first found out I had it as I am sure are many more people....Old or young its still a shock and although I received leaflets being able to talk to others who have the same complaint might ease peoples fears ;)
     
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  20. Amethyst8

    Amethyst8 Type 2 · Active Member

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    for couple of weeks now.
    I recently started for counselling, my diabetes nurse suggested that I will benefit by it. First I refused it &
    decided to go for it & I have been with the psycologist for couple of weeks now. First she asked questions about
    'how I relax etc., She took me for walks on the hospital grounds &
    do some simple hand exersices.Also gave me a cd to listen,which i am doing at my leisure.
    I use it before sleep as it has a relaxation exercise to do. The experience is good I feel i am getting more calmer
    now than before.I am now glad that I use this service & it's free.I was told that you can do self referal in the future.
     
    • Like Like x 2
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