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COVID 2019 Comorbidity with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by Bill_St, Feb 13, 2020.

  1. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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  3. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When you said - Dark Horse, I believe what you quoted was written by Dr. Mercola I thought you referred to the reference @Dark Horse supplied, I don't remember Dr Mercola being mentioned by anyone.
     
  4. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. Now I understand. Dark Horse was responding to my post about Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. I learned about it through one of Dr. Mercola's blog posts.
     
  5. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I wish I had a "not funny" icon to click on.

    America is so polarized now. It's gotten so bad, I don't just read online news articles and trust that the information is correct, I also read the comments section, then I read further on the topic from a variety of news sources. With everything I read now, I'm asking how are they funded? What's their agenda? Can I confirm elsewhere that what's being stated is true?

    Something happened a few days ago involving Trump and the MSM that gave me a bit of a scare. If I can find it again, I'll share it here.
     
  6. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I find the "meh" smiley works just as well... :meh:
     
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  7. Bill_St

    Bill_St Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The U.K. press
    Type 2 diabetics are TWICE as likely to die from Covid-19... and obesity increases the risk even further, new research shows
    • Sufferers from Type 1 diabetes are also three and a half times more likely to die
    • Findings provide further evidence that some patient groups are more at risk
    • Also suggests that lifestyle has a strong impact on virus susceptibility
    • Government is carrying out a major review into whether obesity, ethnicity and gender can also increase the chances of dying from coronavirus
    Patients with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to die from coronavirus – and being obese increases the risk even further, research reveals today.

    A third of deaths from the virus have occurred among individuals with diabetes, which is linked to excess weight and a lack of exercise.

    The study by the NHS and Imperial College London also found that those with Type 1 diabetes –which is not linked to obesity – were three and a half times more likely to die.

    The findings provide further evidence that certain groups of patients are at much higher risk of suffering fatal complications.“

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8337813/Type-2-diabetics-TWICE-likely-die-Covid-19-new-research-shows.html
     
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  8. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    And beyond the headline, is the more tempered reality:

    ‘It also shows that the risk of death for people with diabetes is higher than for people without the condition – with the risk for people with Type 1 being higher than for those with Type 2 – and that a history of higher blood sugar levels as well as obesity seem to be contributing factors.

    ‘It’s very important to remember that the risk of dying from coronavirus – for people with and without diabetes – remains very low, and that as cases of coronavirus decline, the risk to everyone of catching the disease will reduce in turn.’
     
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  9. Khova91

    Khova91 · Member

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    Apparently just being black and male also increase your risk, as black male type 2 diabetic I gotta say all this stuff hasn't been the best for my stress levels.
     
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  10. Bill_St

    Bill_St Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Important to recognise that this study is of patients in Hospital.
    So T1 is at 3 1/2 times at risk - I do wonder if anyone has any figures of the additional risks of T1 in Hospital Before COVID.
    Similarly with T2 - what is the additional risks of hospitalisation without any COVID being around at all!
     
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  11. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    The devil on this is in the detail.

    If you read the paper, being over 50 and having type 1 is a bigger risk factor than simply having type 1, and additionally, other co-morbidities play a large part, especially cardiovascular related ones.

    If you're under 50, there haven't been enough deaths in hospital of people with type 1 to report accurately in the statistics.
     
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  12. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    In all of this, I think the enduring message is respect your diabetes, respect any other comorbidities you might have and respect your general health. Stay is as good shape as you can, and try to avoid catching the virus.

    If course, all very glib and all that, but we can influence some things, but becoming a day older each day that dawns is not under our control, so control the things we can, as best we can.

    Many people currently find themselves with more time on their hands. It'd be good if we could all focus our time of staying healthy and keeping those around us healthy too.
     
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  13. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    I thought that but another way to look at it

    Under 50s make up over 50% of type 1 population yet deaths are so low they cannot be reported. Over 80s make up 4.3% of the diabetic population. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying don't be careful but if under 50s were at a very high risk then given the % of the diabetic population they make up (and also will be those most likely to still be working and active in the community) then surely the numbers would be higher?
     
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  14. zibi1

    zibi1 · Member

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    Exactly. As the doctors who put together the study suggest, age remains, by far, the highest risk factor in determining COVID outcomes. The average age of people with Type 1 Diabetes who, sadly, diesd was 72.

    Also, mortality rates remain extremely low for the younger population. One might be 3 times more likely to die if has Type 1 diabetes and is under 40 compared to a healthy person, but the starting probability of actually dying are so low that the odds are still overwhelming in her/his favour.

    There could be a case, however, to advice shielding for perhaps over 60s or 70s with Type 1 and maybe Type 2 diabetes. In all likelihoood, I think it will end up with a shielding recommendation for over 70s with diabetes, regardless of which Type.
     
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  15. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    In addition my understanding of hazard ratios are that the type one figure of 3.5 is age, sex adjusted etc. But good control and some other factors can lower that risk a bit again.. Whereas comorbidities could perhaps add to it.

    Yes I could see shielding being advised for a particular age group of people with diabetes both types.

    I am under 40 myself and absolute risk might be low but I would hope it doesn't lead to complacency either. It's just wanting to know risk (not guarenteed outcome) so I can make a decision about whether to go for a walk, the shops, meet others outside etc. It's not a free ticket to do whatever I want!
     
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  16. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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  17. zibi1

    zibi1 · Member

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    Taking the right precautions is the right thing to do, primarily to help the spread of the virus. But it remains the case that for some age groups mortality is very very low indeed. You are also correct in pointing out that after adjusting for other conditions the 3.5 number is lower.

    I should also add that people with diabetes (at least Type 1, which is my type) have always been at risk of worse outcomes from all sorts of diseases, starting with the flu - which is the reason why we get a free jab every year I suppose. I believe (I might be wrong) that the increased risk of death from Covid for Type 1s is not higher than the seasonal flu, pneumonia etc. Mind you, I'm talking about the increased risk, not mortality rate, which for Covid is clearly higher than the flu.
     
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  18. Jamie H

    Jamie H · Well-Known Member

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    Agree with all of this. Worth pointing out that at this moment in time we don't actually know how much higher as we've really no idea how many people have/have had it
     
  19. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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  20. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Finally, a doctor in the UK talking about the important role of vitamin D and vitamin C in COVID-19. Thank you Dr. Malcolm Kendrick...



    And he also gives a nod to the Marik protocol - (thiamine, IV vitamin C, hydrocortisone) - to treat sepsis.

    Here's the most up to date treatment for COVID-19 from Dr. Marik and many other doctors... https://www.evms.edu/media/evms_pub...nal_medicine/Marik-Covid-Protocol-Summary.pdf

    [Edited to fix broken link]
     
    #1860 Winnie53, May 20, 2020 at 7:01 PM
    Last edited: May 20, 2020
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