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Dec 2014 update: New research on the Low Carb Diet in general practice

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by Southport GP, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. rowan

    rowan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's good to hear, for you and for me :cool:
    I really don't want to stop lchf because it has brought my levels and weight down so well, so I hope it's just a coincidence that my kidney function went down so drastically at the same time too!
     
  2. Southport GP

    Southport GP HCP · Well-Known Member
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    Good point Sally
    So often folk assume that low carbing is the same as the old Atkins diet which involved lots of protein (often meat) which could be a burdon to some people's kidneys The newer forms of low carbing I prefer have a much greater emphasis on green veg and healthy fats
    Another point of course is the fact that poor diabetic controll Itself is a recognised risk factor for kidney function.
    Yet another risk to watch out for is dehydration whilst taking the drugs known as ACE inhibitors, offer prescribed to aide controll of hypertension.
     
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    #562 Southport GP, May 17, 2015 at 7:14 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2015
  3. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · BANNED

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    Rowan, my lab results related to kidney function (and liver) all improved during my first 3 months on the LCHF diet:

    protein, total: 6.5 normal (Feb); 6.2 normal (May) (reference range (6.0 - 7.8 g/dL)

    microalbumin, urine, random: 4.0 normal (May only) (reference range 0 - 30 mg/L)

    urea nitrogen (BUN): 15 normal (Feb); 11 normal (May) (reference range 6 - 20 mg/dL)

    creatinine: 0.7 normal (Feb); 0.6 normal (May) (reference range 0.5 - 1.1 mg/dL)

    However, changes in my lipid profile were underwhelming, and thyroid results were concerning, so it wasn't all good news. One thing I've read again and again is how important water intake is on the LCHF diet. Hope things turn around for you soon.
     
  4. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My kidney function eGFR dropped to about 60 (from a recommended 90+) while I was on the DUK diet 10-12 years ago & Dr said they were "watching it."
    For the last 7 years on the LCHF diet, my eGFR has been stable - still in the 60s.
    Also my heart health, at 76 y-o is excellent, with resting BP at about 130/70 & no problem playing vigorous tennis & table tennis. I had 3 doubles tennis sets Saturday mostly with & against younger folk. 6/3 2/6 6/3 - about 3 hours. I admit I didn't want a 4th set.
    I have been involved with a long-running heart-diabetes project since about 1990. (SABRE) Comprehensive scans etc last September showed that I have no health problems needing further attention.

    IMO there are a vast number of unsupported dietary myths, assertions & observations being confused by the fact that most people have a very mixed diet. Researchers may ask selective questions or even population studies - like the infamous heart disease, sat fat study. BUT - don't overload your deep fried chips in salt - it may be the reused oil that is the problem.

    We often hear that drinking coffee is good for us in some way, & as often, that it is harmful.
    I drink tea, never coffee - so is my good health & stable diabetes linked to my tea drinking? No - my health was restored by LCHF, with no change in my tea drinking.

    I recommend you ask your Dr for blood test results at least from diabetes diagnosis, & to study to see any trends.
     
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  5. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Baxters beef bouillon works for me
     
  6. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    @Southport GP - Have you noticed Dr Mark Porter's article in today's Times? He is going reduced carb (to c150gr) for a period of 6 weeks, in a specific effort to improve his lipid profile. With a total of 7.5, with sub-optimal (my words, not his) HDL and Trigs, he wants to see if it makes a difference.

    I'll be interested to see if he reports back in February/March.

    If you don't have access behind The Times pay wall, I will copy the article over here.
     
  7. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Please do!
     
  8. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Aaaaawwwwwwwww, OK. Just for you. It doesn't always copy too well, so it may take a few edits to get the spacing right, otherwise we'll have one big, wall-to-wall sentence!

    Give me 5 minutes to fiddle with it.

    Edit: That copied very easily this time, so if we have had a software update, thanks!
     
  9. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    As requested:

    Dr Mark Porter: Why I’ve switched to a low-carb diet for six weeks
    • Image of plate of pasta removed, as it was ginagerous and added nothing to the article. :)
    Dr Mark Porter
    Published at 12:01AM, January 5 2016

    My cholesterol is high, there is heart disease in my family and wholegrain bread has a similar GI score to sugar

    The war on sugar has gone hi-tech this week following the launch of an app that tells shoppers how much is hidden in foods and drinks. The Sugar Smart app, produced by Public Health England (PHE), scans barcodes. It is aimed at parents to help them reduce children’s intake.

    The average British five-year-old consumes their own bodyweight in sugar every year, with predictable effects on dental health and waistlines. But it is not just children who should be concerned. And it is not just added sugar that is worrying nutritionists and doctors.

    You would have to have been living on another planet for the past couple of years to have missed sugar’s rise to the forefront of the debate about healthy eating. We all know that fizzy drinks, cake and confectionery are unhealthy but what about the sugars contained in more complex starchy carbohydrates such as bread and pasta — the sort of foods that make up around half our daily calorific intake?

    There has been growing concern that starchy foods may not be as healthy as previously thought. Low-carb campaigners once dismissed as mavericks are fast becoming mainstream, and the low-fat/high-carb mantra that has pervaded healthy eating for decades is being questioned. It has certainly piqued my interest, so I have decided to make carbohydrates the subject of my new year’s resolution.

    I am a pretty healthy chap. At 14st my weight is acceptable — I am 6ft 2in tall. I am active, training at least four times a week, and I eat a low-fat diet with plenty of fruit and veg. But, despite all this, I have a poor cholesterol profile — something that is all the more worrying because of my family history of early heart disease.

    At 7.5 mmol/l my cholesterol level is 50 per cent higher than ideal but it is the mix of fats in my blood that concerns me more. I don’t have much “good cholesterol” (HDL) and far too many triglycerides — both factors associated with an increased risk of an early heart attack and stroke and, coincidentally, a high intake of carbohydrates.

    The low-fat approach hasn’t made much impact on my blood chemistry, so for 2016 I have decided to try a different tack. Thanks to a sweet tooth and a love of bread I eat far too many carbs, so I am going to cut back on them for the next six weeks and see what it does to my cholesterol profile.

    Starchy foods such as bread, pasta, rice and potatoes are supposed to make up about 50 per cent of the energy you consume every day but my intake is at least 65 per cent. Which means I am consuming a lot of sugar, because that is what starchy carbohydrates are made of — hundreds of little sugar molecules bound together ready to be broken up and absorbed into the bloodstream.

    It is generally accepted that big spikes in your blood sugar level are not good for myriad reasons and starchy carbohydrates often raise it more than refined carbohydrates such as sugar. Nutritionists use the glycaemic index (GI) to measure this effect on blood sugar, using a scale that goes from 0 to 100 where low is good and high is bad, and you may be surprised to discover that granulated sugar has a similar GI to wholegrain bread (58 v 51). A white baguette, my particular bête noire, has a GI index of 95, about half as high again as Coca-Cola.

    My plan is a simple one. I am not going crazy or super-low carb. The aim is to consume no more than 150g a day, which equates to 600 calories, or about 25 per cent of my daily requirement. Studies have shown that a low-carbohydrate diet can raise your good cholesterol and lower your triglycerides — just what I need — so I am going to put that to the test. I will report back.

    Type change4life sugar smart into your search engine for details on the free PHE app.

    Carbohydrate guidelines
    ■ Refined carbohydrates should make up no more than 5 per cent of daily energy intake — that equates to about 30g or 7 teaspoons of sugar a day for the average adult (less than the amount in one can of cola).

    ■ Current guidance advises total carbohydrate intake — sugars plus starchy foods — should make up about 50 per cent of your daily calories (230g for the average woman and 300g for the average man, where 1g = 4 calories approx).
     
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  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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  11. Chook

    Chook Type 2 · Expert

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    Thanks from me, too. :)
     
  12. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    I wonder
    • what he is replacing the carb energy intake with
    • what fats he will be eating (hopefully not too many omega 6s!)
    • if 6 weeks is enough to make a significant difference at 150g carbs a day
    Hope he reports back.

    :)
     
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