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Diabetes manners

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Lynz84, Apr 22, 2016.

  1. Diabetic Krissy

    Diabetic Krissy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I would have told them exactly where to shove it! We have to inject multiple times a day... if I have to go and hide every time I do it is a waste of time... it takes 2 seconds to inject... I have a friend who is scared of needles so when I am about to inject I warn her so she can look away... She is fine with that.
     
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  2. lizdeluz

    lizdeluz Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't inject in public loos for hygiene reasons.
    I have worried about how to inject in public in the past, but now have worked out my own system:
    If I'm with people who know that I'm diabetic, I inject into 1 cm of bare flesh at waist level, or through clothes if necessary, without looking anyone in the eye.
    If I'm in view of complete strangers in a café/restaurant, I go ahead and inject as above.
    If I'm with friends/colleagues who don't yet know that I'm diabetic, I tell them that I am about to inject and why. And then I go ahead and inject.
    I don't know about you, perhaps I'm losing it, but I feel that doing the injections and testing properly is plenty to be getting on with, without having to worry about the reactions of others.
     
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  3. JohnEGreen

    JohnEGreen Other · Master

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    The little prick.
     
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  4. richyb

    richyb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The same thing happened to me whilst on a trip for my company in Poland. A work college of mine took objection. I hated this, made me feel depressed. But afterwards did it in toilet. I now inject if out under the table as new pens are easier.
    Strange how people say we are dissabled and yet we cannot get dissability benefit .....
     
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  5. Sable_Jan

    Sable_Jan · Guest

    Not all all....I don't need to inject (fortunately) but I test at table b4 I eat. She was probs afraid people would think you were a junkie. I don't think anyone should say that to you....you're doing nothing wrong and IF "other people" don't like it it's their problem!! Big hugs
     
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  6. IZ THE LEG END

    IZ THE LEG END LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I always inject as discreetly as possible, I was in a similar situation "in laws" her mum requested I took myself elsewhere... I looked at my wife smiled then stood and showed her exactly what I do in plain view (I know not really the nicest thing to do but she really boiled my wee!!! ) and that next time not to be so narrow minded or rude... I've been to several dinners since and she's never approached the subject again... I always sit as close as possible to her now just to annoy her
     
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  7. Sable_Jan

    Sable_Jan · Guest

    No probs with that....your personal choice
     
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  8. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Just plain rudeness and ignorance.. From them, not you!!
     
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  9. Cathn61may

    Cathn61may Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In 49 years of having injections have I ever had a comment made about injecting myself before I eat in a restaurant. With the pen you can be so discreet. I inject in my tummy. Bit awkward if you have a dress on. If anyone should look or comment just say "the things you have to do to stay alive.". Toilets have germs.
     
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  10. mojo_101

    mojo_101 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I remember standing in a (bouncy) plane toilet, my feet planted backwards and leaning forward with my forehead lodged on the sloping ceiling for stability, syringe cap in my mouth (nowhere else is clean-ish) phial between my fingers, again to avoid dirty surfaces.... that sort of routine used to be common for me. Also totally avoiding touching ANYTHING whilst going to toilets with my kit and NOT putting anything down. Restaurants were often the worst (esp Friday nights), as previously, but made me even more obsessive. On the positive side it made me quite ambidextrous.
    For the last 20 plus years I have never moved from where I sit, and though it took a while to get into it, I didn't give a hoot in the end. Nobody ever said anything, and I didn't ever explain it (perhaps once to a mate's kids). I do remember a couple of glares, but I glared back.
    In the very old days I had to cook up syringes/needles in pans on a school exchange trip, so it was perhaps more open and discussed in those days, but I would not want to go back to the old kit for sure. Pens are very subtle so I can'T understand anyone making an issue, unless they choose to on principle.
    In a perfect world there would be more tolerance and understanding, but that does seem to become less likely as time passes.

    xxx
     
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  11. ann34+

    ann34+ Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    .......not sure it is always embarrassment or needle phobia that makes some people not like others injecting at meals - is it maybe possible that there may be an unspoken and probably unacknowledged element of not wanting to confront illness, or feeling very uncomfortable about illness, or even a feeling almost of 'shame by association' that a relative at the table has a chronic illness......?
     
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  12. Lynz84

    Lynz84 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi ann34+ i understand what you mean, but theres no shame to be had with diabetes and anyone who feels that way needs educating!
     
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  13. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I can believe it, unfortunately. As the saying goes, 'there's nowt as queer as folk' :rolleyes:
     
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  14. Spliffdic

    Spliffdic Type 2 · Member

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    Th
    Thats ridiculous! They should be understanding of what you are going through. How cruel that is sending you somewhere else. Hugs and kisses Xx
     
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  15. candi-girl

    candi-girl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    someone said this to me in the past at the table. i did an air shot of insulin to make sure the needle worked so the insulin landed in her wine glass. she was not happy, but i was. i then injected in my arm and made quite a show and dance about it. people suck :(
     
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  16. yycdordor

    yycdordor LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Hey, you are not sensitive at all! Just like breast feeding - we shouldn't feel embarrassing of doing it. We are working very hard to fight this disease!
     
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  17. fowlerjacqui

    fowlerjacqui Type 2 · Member

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    My husband told his sister I needed an injection before lunch in Easter Sunday over the phone. She told him I would have to go in the car and do it as it would frighten the children. I was a bit upset about her attitude but went upstairs in the bathroom and did it.
     
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  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Crikey aren't people mean!!

    We stayed two weeks with friends 4 years ago... Their one year old daughter loved my pump and injections.. At 5 now she just accepts that I have an injection before I eat with a little gadget and blood...
    She goes into my bag and gets it all out for me!!

    Adults have the problems not children...
     
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  19. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Could not agree more! When I inject in front of my nephew or my friends kids they are never frightened, just completely fascinated & asking questions - which are easily answered: your tummy makes insulin to help you get the energy from your food, but my tummy doesn't make insulin any more so I have to inject it when I eat so I can get the energy from my food. No, it doesn't really hurt. Simple & it lets any of the less informed people at the table get a simple explaination too!
     
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  20. debrasue

    debrasue · Guest

    Hi Lynz!
    No, I don't think you're being sensitive at all. I think any normal, sane person would feel exactly as you did under those circumstances.
    But how your sister-in-law acted says much more about her than it does about you. As we all do at times, she wasn't considering how her actions would make you feel - she was purely focused on her own agenda. Depending on the relationship you have with her, you would be perfectly justified in introducing her to a bit of a reality check on that!
    Who knows, she might take it to heart and grow a little as a result. Or not......... but at least you would have defined yourself as a person with feelings, not just a medical condition!
    xx
     
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