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Diagnosed type 2 today and scared

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Seagal75, May 26, 2017.

  1. Seagal75

    Seagal75 · Member

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    Hello everyone,
    I had a type 2 diagnosis this morning and feel very alone and scared.
    After reading for most of the day about type 2, as too upset to work, I feel reassured that there's a group I can talk to.

    I feel ashamed and embarrassed to have this condition. I'm 45, a couple of stone overweight bmi of 29 - have been since my mid late 30s. I carry my weight on my belly. I have carbs (pasta, bread) and cheese a lot, but eat lots of veg and fruit too. Recently took up running and do 5k 2/3 times a week.

    The experience at the Drs was horrible - he said I have diabetes, gave me a measurement of 83 and said normal was 48. It was just mentioned as matter of fact, given print out and meds. I asked the Dr about chances of reversing it as I'd seen a lot about it in media, but he didn't want to talk about that and said a change of diet might help but I need to start meds. I felt patronised and like I was a waste of space to him.

    I really don't want to take the pills. They sound horrible. I want to do low calorie or low carb and see how I go. The sheet he gave me on diet was just a normal diet with no latest advice. I bought a blood sugar reader today and have had a mixture of results from 8.8 - 11.9. Also got reversing diabetes book from Amazon.

    All in all, it's been a depressing day. Hope I will feel more positive as I try to deal with this and lose the weight.
     
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  2. Dairygrade

    Dairygrade Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Seagal175 first I would like to welcome you to the forum I'm sorry you've been diagnosed with diabetes like everyone whose first diagnosed it's a lot to take in but with the help of the great people here you will find your not doing this alone sadly I can't really comment on a type 2 as I'm type 1 on insulin but there will be someone along to give you all the advice you may need so good luck and keep asking all the questions you've got.
     
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  3. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

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    Hi and welcome
    Obviously all of us Type 2's have been where you are to a greater or lesser extent. It can seem like a huge problem but it is also possible to overcome.
    For me it was cutting out carbs from what I ate which I found relatively easy as I love meat and fattier foods so ate those whilst cutting out anything sweet or starchy. So now I eat eggs,bacon, meat, fish, avocado, butter, double cream, green veg and salad. Nuts are ok and for snacks some pork scratchings.. doesn't sound much like a diet does it?
    Cut out bread, pasta, rice, potatoes anything sugary and especially breakfast cereal.
    i would strongly suggest testing your blood sugar level before and 2 hours after each meal. This will show you the foods that cause your blood sugar to spike and so are best avoided. You want to aim for less than 2 mmol/l rise 2 hours after food.
    There's a huge amount of info on this sire so have a read around and come back with any questions someone will always be along with an answer.
    Don't despair the condition is certainly controllable.
     
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  4. Hiitsme

    Hiitsme Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Seagal75 and welcome;
    I will tag @daisy1 who will post some helpful info for newcomers.
    I was diagnosed with an HbA1c of 95 and it is now in the mid 30's so it is possible with a change of diet. When Daisy posts her info try to go through it and you might find the low carb program helpful. It is the carbs that we need to reduce. Well done in getting a meter. I was diagnosed with a fasting reading of 18 and it took me several months to get down to levels I am happy with. My advice would be to write down everything you are eating with quantities and your readings. If you test before a meal and 2 hours after you will see how that food impacted on your blood. I aimed for a rise of less than 2 after 2 hours but that took me some time so don't expect instant results.
     
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  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    welcome here Seagal75 :)
    you will find great help and support in this forum ...so stay here and read and learn and ask all the questions you will need an answer to
     
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    #5 Freema, May 26, 2017 at 11:08 PM
    Last edited: May 28, 2017
  6. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi & welcome @Seagal75 ,

    You have come to the right place..

    The good news is you have a personal meter! :cool:

    No question is too silly. Ask away! :)
     
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  7. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome :D I am wondering why you are feeling ashamed and embarrassed. Type 2 diabetes is a result mostly of genetics combined with a modern high carb processed diet. If you are not genetically predisposed it does not matter what you do or eat you will not develop it. It sound to me like you have been doing exactly what you have been told is healthy as far as diet goes and you are exercising as well. The fact that this diet advice is wrong is not your fault. Please do not play the blame game with yourself. The past is done, the information to help you in the future is here with this fantastic group of people. Keep reading, keep posting, and soon you will get your head around things and get it under control.
     
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  8. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi there. I'm two weeks down the line from you and was shocked and horrified by my diagnosis too. I'm sorry your Dr wasn't helpful, it seems I was lucky in that respect, and I've already had my education session and eye check up. Were these mentioned to you?
    This forum is brilliant, loads of info, encouragement and support. God knows how I'd be managing without it.
    I am getting the hang of things. I'm keeping to less than 100g of carbohydrates per day and doing regular blood sugar checks. It is a steep learning curve but I am now boring my husband and daughter telling them the carb counts in everything. This evening I'm sure my husband didn't enjoy his triple chocolate cookie half as much as he should have after I told him it had 40.3g carbohydrate in it!
     
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  9. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I found it easy to return to below diabetic levels in a couple of months - it seems that the advice about what to eat is all wrong and Dr Atkins was right all along. I just stick to low carb foods and it is no problem at all.
     
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  10. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to this fabled forum where many unicorns are found.

    Many of us have shared your fears and have since found a brighter easier path...
     
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  11. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Don't worry because you are in safe hands. All of us went through the same process and have learned to live without fear. It takes time but you are not alone in this.
     
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  12. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome @Seagal75. Most of us have been in the same place as you, but within a few weeks have found a new way of eating that is delicious, have lost weight and kept it off, while feeling a lot healthier. You have come to a forum of helpful people, read and ask as many questions as you want. Please accept that what is done is over and the future will be different but just as good. You have made a really good start by getting yourself a meter, be patient with yourself and persevere with using it. You will find that the numbers will come down as you find the foods and portion sizes that you should be eating. The media would like us all to be ashamed but I have had people tell me that I have inspired them because I have changed my life and my colleagues at work are a lot more aware of their own health. Changes made a little at a time add up, eggs, cheese and salads are all friendly foods and easy in this weather. So enjoy the summer weather!
     
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  13. Looseboy

    Looseboy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome @Seagal75
    You are not alone in your experiences and feelings.

    I to am new to diabetes and this forum circa5 weeks.
    Same experience with the doctor and my own desire not to take pills.

    There is a wealth of experience on here and wide ranging views to allow you many options and paths to consider and follow.

    All the best, don't be down.
     
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  14. Seagal75

    Seagal75 · Member

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    Thank you for all your kind replies. I am feeling more positive this morning and guess the news has sunk in, and no point getting down about it anyhow.

    I am starting the low carb today and will keep using the forum. As a lot of you have said this is a wake up call to a healthier way of living and I will ultimately feel a lot better about myself after losing the weight. Thank you for inspiring me.
     
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  15. Robkww

    Robkww · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Seagal75 welcome and great to see you have turned the first corner and returned with a positive attitude - stick at it and you will find a way that works for you - I did.

    Forum members - great encouragement for our new member and witness the effect!
     
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  16. ChrisTeapot

    ChrisTeapot Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Seagal. Like the others have said we've all been there and feeling disappointed, scared and in my case a bit angry at yourself but you can get back in charge. My advice would be to start looking at the carb count of food it's really quite surprising what different foods have in them.

    Good news on the blood glucose meter - it shows you'll be fine :)

    Ordering steak and chips at the restaurant and leaving the chips will be second nature soon enough lol.
     
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    #16 ChrisTeapot, May 27, 2017 at 9:34 AM
    Last edited: May 27, 2017
  17. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @Seagal75

    Hello Seagal and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be pleased to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  18. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Don't panic. With a low-carb diet you should find both your weight and blood sugar will go down. I suspect you have been prescribed Metformin. It's not a miracle drug but very safe. If any bowel issues last more than week or two do ask the GP for the Slow Release (SR) version.
     
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  19. melissa1743

    melissa1743 Type 2 · Member

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    Hello Seagal75,

    I'm afraid I have no advice for you as I am only one month since I was diagnosed. I did want to say though that my experience with a doctor (well in my case nurse) mirrors my own exactly, I actually felt like she was reading from a script and could not interupt with questions, or comments. I too felt completely patronised and came out realising I am no longer an individual but just a HbA1c. I was told not to test my blood sugar levels (what????) and so like you bought one myself. And like you I am trying to low carb diet rather than medication - though I was told to take metformin. Anyway, just wanted to say you are not alone because I am on the same confusing and frightening journey so if you want to message me feel free.

    Best wishes to you.
     
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  20. chridjov

    chridjov Type 2 · Member

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    I hear you, I felt the same when I was diagnosed too. I know following a strict diet is a bit hard but there are a lot of alternative that is available out there.
    Best wishes.
     
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