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Fatty Liver

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by UsmanMo96, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. UsmanMo96

    UsmanMo96 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I recently had my serum alt checked and it was 166 iu/l I know it says its suppose to be <42iu/l it was 80 iu/l 3 months prior.

    I have been struggling with glucose control for over a year now and I wanted to know if anyone had this problem and what they did to overcome it and if there blood sugar levels got better with the liver being back to normal?
     
  2. Antechinus

    Antechinus Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    All my liver function levels have come down with using low carb healthy fats diet.

    If you avoid fructose and other starches, (and booze is a starch) like the plague it will get better.

    Others with more experience with controlling sugars are better qaulified, but livers have remarkable healing capacity, as long as there is no sclerosis. Dont wait for that to occur.
     
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  3. TriciaWs

    TriciaWs Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    My fatty liver, and triglycerides, improved by going low carb even while I ate more fat.
    If you want to try low carb there is lots of advice, and some great recipes, in the forum.

    (I have double cream at least once a day, full fat milk in coffee, plus cheese.)
     
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  4. sno0opy

    sno0opy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I also have had this with similar levels to start with but mine are coming down. My scan said that my liver was very very fatty and I was at risk of it starting to scar.


    I stopped drinking and significantly reduced my carb intake, mainly removed all simple carbs and just eat whole grains/much smaller portions.


    One method which really works but may not be suitable depending on your current condition is High intensity exercise. There have been various studies that have linked High intensity training to improvements in Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and heart function.


    The basic principle as I understand it is that you do exercise at a very high intensity for short durations repeatedly (At an intensity that would mean you can’t speak during the exercise period). This means your body is unable to produce enough energy to support your needs and your liver releases some of its stored fat as energy to meet that need. When you do walking or endurance exercise your body is able to convert stored fat from other places slowly so the liver does not need to burn its reserves in this way.


    This cane be many many types of exercise including at home:


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05w69pz


    But the principle is perhaps doing 10 30/60 second very very high intensity sets with a 1 min rest or similar in between. (As you get fitter you can add more – im doing 20 – 30 mins now)


    At home you can do star jumps, running on the spot, press ups, squats, burpees, arm raisers with tins of beans in your hands all that kind of thing. At a gym you have many more options.


    Either way, I have found it very good to do because even when I can’t get a full exercise session in, I can do 15min HITT at home and still get a small benefit.


    The good thing about it, is that it does not matter how fit you are. You can be crazy unfit or already quite fit. Because you work as hard as you are physically able to you still get a benefit as long as you give it everything you have.


    The only issue is that it does take will power, if you do it half baked and at a casual pace it wont have the same effect, your body needs to be in “chased by a bear mode”
     
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  5. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I was diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease right before turning out to be a T2. They said there was nothing I could do about it, but with klow carb/high fat I got my liver back to normal, besides getting my blood glucose back in check. So well worth the effort!
     
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  6. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Back when diagnosed my liver was hard and large, but low carb soon seemed to make a difference, but I should confess to dancing morris jigs in private - started off holding onto the backs of two chairs to stay upright.
    It is not quite the chased by a bear intensity - though the music encourages continuation even when the heart is pounding.
    I can now bend down to the lower shelves without my ribs being pushed out, and have even danced when not alone....
     
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