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Freaking Out A Little.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by maitai, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. maitai

    maitai Type 2 · Member

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    So i'm freaking out a little bit, I don't really know what to think, I was diagnosed 3 days ago with T2.

    I just got my glucose meter 2 days ago.

    Yesterday my FBG was 7.2, I had oatmeal (didn't get to test my blood then), at lunch I had chicken and salad and 2 hours after that my BG was 7.4. Before bed my BG was 6.3.

    This morning, my FBG was 7.6, before I had breakfast it was 7.7 and then 2 hours after eating (and taking metformin) and a bit of exercise it's at 8.9. I immediately started bawling because that's the highest i've seen it.

    I don't know if stress is affecting this but seeing 8.9 really scared me and I don't know what to do.
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    It is very early days yet. Stress, exercise, foods and infection can all affect our levels as well as some medications and even the weather. You are doing all the right things so far and I guarantee you will gradually lower those numbers soon. It is good to remember that fasting levels take the lo gest to come down. Keep at it, you'll get there.
     
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  3. Chronicle_Cat

    Chronicle_Cat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I just got a glucose meter and started testing 3 days ago. The poster above me is correct. It takes time to get levels down.

    Yes, stress can effect blood sugar and cause it to raise.

    As well, many diabetics find that higher carb foods (ie breads & grains, potatoes & starchy vegetables like sweet potatoes and corn & dried beans can cause spikes in blood glucose. Blood glucose meters are very helpful for determining what foods cause spikes. For me, I discovered that even though soybeans are quite low in carbs, my highest reading occurred after eating them in a homemade chili. I'm going to try them again in a few days and if I see another spike, I'll eliminate them.
     
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  4. Geoffno6

    Geoffno6 · Well-Known Member

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    The replies you’ve had all make sense so I won’t repeat them. I was in the mid teens for my first few days after diagnosis and have met people who hit 30s and 40s so hopefully you’ll feel your 6s and 7s aren’t really bad. I’ve spent a month and now get 6s and 7s by virtually excluding the obvious high carb foods and now excluding good low carb foods like veg and salad. So I’d think you should be able to control things with just sensible eating. It could even be a blessing in a very heavy disguise!!
     
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  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    If I ate oats I'd have the same response - high carb foods produce high levels of blood glucose, it was eaten in the morning - usually insulin resistance is highest then, and you tested after exercise, your liver probably released glucose to allow for you having to exert yourself. Once you are familiar with the things which cause spikes you'll be able to minimize the really high ones by modifying your diet, but some raised blood glucose levels are perfectly natural responses to activity.
     
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  6. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi @maitai, don't get stressed about one reading. Your readings generally are good, and you need to look at the general trend.
    If you had oatmeal before the 8.9 reading that might have caused the higher reading. I used to have porridge in winter, but after testing 2 hours later I got a 10.4 reading, the highest I've ever got. The oats immediately went into the recycling bin and I've not eaten oats since then.
     
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  7. rhubarb73

    rhubarb73 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Make yourself a promise that for the next 30 days you will test before and after every meal, write down what you ate and the test results and will not overreact to those individual results.
    Then after a month review the entire data set and think about your plan from there.
    I recommend (if you have a mobile device) the MySugr app to record your results and get a Hba1C prediction.
     
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  8. Element137

    Element137 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome - remember its a marathon, not a sprint. You are very early in this journey, so try not to be too hard on yourself. As already pointed out, it takes a bit of time to get your head around this - you are in a good starting point as you have a meter - it may help you to keep a food dairy for a few weeks, and track your pre-meal and post meal levels ( after 2 hours ) - this will allow you see what foods are doing to your BG levels - then eliminate or limit the ones that are causing the biggest spikes - at this very early stage that's about all you need to get you going - once you get the hang of that - if you have a good read around on here you will see the results that can be achieved - give yourself a bit of time, and don't beat yourself up if you see spikes - at least you know what has caused it - we all react differently, you can adjust what you are eating to your specific results from your meter.
     
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  9. Element137

    Element137 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    will tag @daisy1 who will pass on some info that will help you. Good luck ! .
     
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  10. Derbysocks

    Derbysocks Type 2 · Active Member

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    I was advised to test when I get up, & just before lunch & tea & when I go to bed. The only other times I test is every 2 hours when driving.
     
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  11. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why do you test when driving?
     
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  12. Chronicle_Cat

    Chronicle_Cat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I presume it's too see if she is hypoglycemic which can be unsafe (this can be an issue for Type 2s who take meds or insulin when they are being adjusted.)
     
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  13. micksmixxx

    micksmixxx Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi maitai,

    As others have already mentioned, there are a number of reasons that your blood sugar (glucose) level might rise. What I didn't notice, however, was anyone mentioning how exercise can also cause levels to RISE. This occurs due to your body not knowing whether your exercise is because you are running away from a predator/attacker, or whether you're preparing to stand and fight. In either case, your body would need a ready supply of glucose to 'feed' your muscles. This results in your adrenal glands ... tiny glands that sit on top of each kidney ... producing cortisol, which stimulates your liver to give up some of its stores of glycogen, which can quickly be changed back into glucose and 'pushed' back into your bloodstream.

    It's continued exercise AND types of exercise that cause a lowering of blood glucose levels.

    You also need to take into account how soon after exercising you tested your blood glucose level.

    Many years ago my body used to run like clockwork. I used to run marathons, so was almost always out training. I could almost guarantee that between 1 and 1.5 hours after training my blood glucose level would be low.

    I can appreciate how upsetting it must have been for you to see figures that YOU thought were high. Please believe me, your blood glucose levels are NOT very high. As others have already stated, you are on this 'diabetes lark' for a very long time, so don't focus on a few readings. It's what you do over the long-term that's going to make a difference. You WILL learn what you need to do to lower your blood glucose levels and, hopefully, keep them low, so don't be hard on yourself. I doubt, very much, that any member of your diabetes support team ... doctor/endocrinologist, diabetes specialist nurse, certified diabetes eductor, dietitian, etc. would see this as being bad.

    (((((Hugs))))) to you, ma'am.

    Lots of Love and Light.

    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x

    P.S. Please don't be offended, or alarmed, at the 'x's'. It's merely a logo, of sorts, that I've used for more than 40 years now.
     
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  14. Gloucestergirl

    Gloucestergirl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am 72 and have had diabetes for 23 years and my blood sugar at diagnosis, aged 49, was 22. I was on tablets for eight years before I started insulin. The advice was that I should keep my sugar levels "normal" which at the time was between 4 and 6 and to eat plenty of pasta, wholemeal bread, jacket potatoes etc. My levels went up quite high at times, even on insulin, so I was giving myself more and more Novorapid at mealtimes as well as Lantus at night and my blood sugar swung between hypos and hypers over the years. In April I saw a specialist diabetes nurse and she said that older people could have higher "normal" sugar levels and it was the younger ones who should keep to lower "normal" levels. She gave me a target of 7-9 before meals and 10-12 . She wasn't very happy about the fact that I had started a low-carb diet as she didn't want my levels going too low as for years they have been more concerned about low levels than high ones even after we are always being told that high sugar levels cause all sorts of problems with our body. I saw her again a couple of weeks ago and she was very pleased with the fact that my HBA1C had gone down from 71 to 61 which apparently is 8.6 down to 7.7. and all my sugar levels were within target. This has obviously been caused by the low carb diet where I had cut out potatoes and bread and stopped snacking on crisps and chocolate biscuits. I lost about 3kgs although I am not overweight. At the time I thought that the diabetes nurse was giving me targets that were too high but I have found a very interesting article that backs up her recommendations. If you Google Elderly A1C Targets: Should older people have more relaxed glucose goals? You will see that higher than "normal" sugar levels are preferable in the elderly population. As my before meal sugar levels have been within the targets I have reduced my insulin from 5 or 6 units of Novorapid at every meal to 2 units or, like today, no injections at all. I split my Lantus dose to twice a day a few months ago and have reduced it from 24 units a day to 8 in the morning and 7 in the evening and am starting to lower it even more in the hope that I can stop insulin altogether just by reducing the carbs. Perhaps if the original poster Maitai is in the older category then those sugar levels, which aren't too high by the way, are perfectly acceptable with this new thinking that the older need not go so low. Please read the article.
     
  15. Gloucestergirl

    Gloucestergirl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, should have said a target of 7-9 before meals and 10-12 before bed.
     
  16. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @maitai and welcome! You've just commenced a new life experience and like all new experiences have a bit of a learning curve ahead of you. But, have no fear you'll soon get to grips with things and settle into a diabetic lifestyle as has most folk on DCUK and we've all found those first few months a bit confusing, worrying and challenging.
    Going by what you've said about your testing results:
    Your FBG is pretty good as BG tends to show a peak in the morning due to what's called 'the dawn effect'. I just wish mine was always as low!
    Your post-prandial rise from 7.7 to 8.9 is also darn good as it indicates that what you ate didn't elevate BG too much and 8.7 is only a little above the post-prandial 8.5 NICE guideline.
    What I would suggest you do to help you understand how what you eat impacts your BG is to test before meals and then two hours later and keep a note of just what you have eaten and then avoid the foods that seem to elevate BG. We are all different in our reactions - I know I can't eat oatmeal without spiking my BG, though others can get away with it.
    I'm sure @daisy1 will pop up shortly with some very useful info for you, but meanwhile just hang on in there, don't panic, don't worry - you'll soon get to grips with your D and will find that managing it isn't too difficult at all.
     
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  17. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @maitai

    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask questions when you need to and someone will help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  18. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    This is a link to the article quoted by @Gloucestergirl:
    https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/elderly-a1c-targets-older-people-relaxed-glucose-goals/

    I think you would have to see the research which this blog is commenting on. But it is apparently based on a study of only 132 people over 65, whose average age was 78.
    From what I understand it is saying older people should have a higher BMI to prevent them becoming 'frail'.
     
  19. bkr

    bkr Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Dont worry, dont be hard on yourself either - many if not all of us T2's have been through this. Lots of kind people on here with reassuring words & advice. Its early days, take it easy, monitor things it does get easier.
     
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  20. Gloucestergirl

    Gloucestergirl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In answer to Contralto, I had been on Metformin almost from when I was diagnosed in 1995 and was on it with a couple of short breaks until 2016 when I had to have a course of B12 injections, metformin being a known cause of the vitamin deficiency. I decided to stop taking them for a few days and it was miraculous, my very poor appetite went overnight (Metformin is an appetite suppressant) and I actually felt hunger pains for the first time in years!. I asked my diabetes nurse if I could stay off them and she agreed as long as I kept my eye on my levels which didn't change much without the tablets. I am on my second day of no Novorapid with meals and yet my sugar levels are either the same or better than when I was injecting. I may have to give myself a tiny little bit now and again but hopefully just cutting down on the carbs will mean that I can eventually stop the Lantus as well. At diagnosis I was told that diabetes is progressive and that I would have to take more and more medication to counteract the sugar levels but if I had known that lowering carbs could do the same thing I probably wouldn't now have diabetic retinopathy which has led to laser treatment or possibly an injection in my eyes.
     
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