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frozen shoulder

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by catherinecherub, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Am suffering from a frozen shoulder and have been since April. My GP says that this is common in diabetics. Have recently had 2 cortizone injections. No improvement noticed. Am now waiting to see a specialist. How common is this with diabetics?
     
  2. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    I can't say I've ever hear of it being specific to diabetics.I have a problem with my shoulder but that was long before I became diabetic.The only thing I can think of is,in overweight people ,there can be stress on the nerves of the shoulder due to the weight.
     
  3. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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  4. Jacqhar

    Jacqhar · Active Member

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    Hi

    I too have a frozen shoulder - I've had it for nearly 2 years now and have been told by my GP, DSN and a friend with T1 this is very common. I had a couple of cortizone injections last year; all that did was raise my bs levels then earlier this year I had some physio sessions which help a lot with my flexibility but it has gradually come back. I have an appointment with my GP on Monday when I am going to insist on being referred. I'm so fed up with not even being able to fasten my own underwear.

    My friend has had his shoulder manipulated and is fine now - has anyone else.

    Jacqueline
     
  5. martinbuchan

    martinbuchan · Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunatley more common and more more severe in diabetes. In fact, people who have had a frozen shoulder in both sides will have a 35% risk of being diabetic. Physio just causes more pain initially. I often give steroid injections, but I believe it is a waste of time until the frozen stage has been reached (the limitation of movement has stopped getting worse, the freezing stage is when the shoulder is still getting worse, and the thawing phase when it is improving). Manipulation under anaesthetic is used, again not by me until the frozen stage is reached. It does have a reputation of being less successful in diabetics.

    It is a poorly understood condition, but probably worth seeing your local shoulder surgeon. It can cause a lt of protracted pain and stiffness. Good outcome eventually though.
     
  6. Tinkerbelly

    Tinkerbelly · Well-Known Member

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    In addition to what Martin has said, if you do decide to push for an MUA, that on its own wont fix your problem. You will need to have really good physio done more or less straight away or else your shoulder will just start to stiffen up again. The physio sessions will need to go on for quite a few weeks and also alot of exercises need to be done at home too. I had my right shoulder manipulated 3 times over a period of 3 years. It was only on my 3rd MUA that I had a top notch physiotherapist who really knew his stuff and was able to loosen up all the muscles in my back and enable me to lift my arm up in the air. Just as my right shoulder got better, my left shoulder started to freeze. By this time, I was completed p.....ed off with frozen shoulders so decided to just leave the MUA off. The shoulder got better on its own accord with nothing being done to it :eek:
     
  7. martinbuchan

    martinbuchan · Well-Known Member

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    Hi tinkerbelly

    you probably had your MUAs done to early (in the freezing phase). The shoulder joint is incredibly inflammed in this initial phase. Any treatment is reversed by the disease process , whether it is physio, steroid injection or a MUA. The timing of treatment depends on the disease moving to the frozen stage, then the shoulder will improve. I do not believe any physio can overcome the freezing stage, and all that is acheived is exaserabation of pain and apathy towards the physiotherapist. Best to leave things until the correct phase is reached.
     
  8. Tinkerbelly

    Tinkerbelly · Well-Known Member

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    Martin, I waited for about 18 months from the freezing state, then to frozen and then the thaw before having the first MUA done. My shoulder was well and truly frozen
     
  9. martinbuchan

    martinbuchan · Well-Known Member

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    The overall length of a frozen shoulder is from 6 months to 4 years. Most are about 18 months. You might have a particularily long one - bad luck. I dread to think what would happen if I get one........
     
  10. IanD

    IanD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if mine was typical - I play tennis. I followed my father's idea & wear vests with short sleeves. I also take glucosamine/chondroitin. For a matter of years it was uncomfortable to lie on my right shoulder. It's better now, but I don't know why it came or went. I still take the g/c combination.

    It started with my father when he had an old car with a draughty door. Buying a car with a close fitting door helped a lot.
     
  11. Jay3109

    Jay3109 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a frozen shoulder about 4 years ago after a car accident...a year of physio, no nasty injections and (touch wood) absolutely fine since...I never associated it with my diabetes. However, I believe that those lovely statins that we all are encouraged to take, can also affect mobility and joints. So before blaming the disease, maybe (just maybe) we also need to look a bit at the drugs!!!
     
  12. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Thanks for all your comments re the above. It affects me every day. I cannot get dressed without pain, impossible to drive as I cannot reverse. I am right handed and it is the left shoulder that is affected. Have to find new ways to do simple tasks,i.e. changing duvet cover, filling kettle, reaching above head, or sideways causes immense pain and my arm will not go behind at all. I know that one day it will get better, I just wish it was today.
     
  13. Blackadder

    Blackadder · Well-Known Member

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    I have had this in both shoulders, it's one of the most painful things I have ever had. It's horrible and stops you from doing anything properly. My first one started after a collission with a goalkeeper playing football and landing akwardly on my shoulder but the second one just happened for no apparant reason. It was 2 years for each.

    The best thing for this I found was physio but only during the thawing stage.
     
  14. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    I've had it too. Had physio, with no discernable good effect. It eventually got better although I do still feel a twinge if I carry a heavy bag of shopping. David Mendosa has written on this. Check out his website.
     
  15. candyrel

    candyrel Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In my defence my frozen shoulder was so painful that something had to be done.

    When I was living in Wormerveer (Holland) several years ago now I needed help urgently as I was not fit to work or sort out the house move....nothing. My now ex partner went to Amsterdam and bought me a slice of cake (I am a non smoker) With directions to warm it slightly in the microwave ... well I slept a much needed sleep and woke up and I was pain free. :oops:
     
  16. JAD337

    JAD337 · Member

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    I am currently suffering from frozen shoulder. However, it manifested itself as a "twinge" in my arm whenever I reached for something, especially if I was reaching behind me. It also played havoc with my badminton, I would play a shot and get the "twinge" and my arm would feel like a nerve was trapped for a minute or so. However, the worst incident was a fall at skiing when I landed on my shoulder and it took nearly an hour to wear off. I also had some discomfort in my upper arm when lying in bed.
    My doctor examined my arm and shoulder and established that I had restriced movement in my shoulder, something I'd not really been fully aware of. She prescribed Ibuprofen and physiotherapy. The Ibuprofen had an amazing effect. My BGs had been slowly increasing towards unacceptable levels, but as soon as I started taking the Ibuprofen they returned to "normal"!! That side effect lasted for a few weeks but gradually wore off. Anybody else come across that one?

    I am currently receiving physio and there has been some improvement in all symptoms, but the problem hasn't fully gone away. My own belief, based on comments from other sufferers, is that it would gradually get better of its own accord, but I'll continue the physio and hope it speeds up the process.

    I don't know, this diabetes coupled with the ageing process is a real fun thing ain't it?!! :lol:
     
  17. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    It's risky to use illegal treatments here. Is your case worth getting arrested for?
    If so go ahead
     
  18. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    PS (Not for the men)
    Fastening that bra is the very devil with a frozen shoulder isn't it? almost made me resort to the "do it up in front and twizzle " method
     
  19. graham64

    graham64 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm on your side, I used a certain Herbal Remedy :oops: when I was at my lowest ebb following the loss of my wife, orthodox meds did not help my depression, in fact some of the anti depressants I was prescribed made me feel even worse.I'll just add that I only used It for a few weeks.

    Regards Graham

     
  20. Jem

    Jem · Well-Known Member

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    urgh - another ****** list item ...

    I had one years ago (a few years after a motorbike accident) and every day I find more reasons and "likelihoods" that I've been diabetic for more years than I thought!

    They suck ... big hairy ones - so sorry to hear you're suffering ~ they DO generally improve :)
     
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