mysorian

Well-Known Member
Messages
52
Type of diabetes
Treatment type
Other
It is a work in progress. What I have so far is this. The second column is carbs.

100 gms apple has 14 gms carbs and 52 calories
14​
100 gms of unsweetened Soya 38 cals
4​
100 gms cooked Quacker Old fashioned oats 63.4 cals
10.8​
100 gms of Walnuts 654 cals
13.7​
100 gms of salted peanuts 599 calories
15.26​
100 gms of unsalted peanuts 585
21.51​
1 tbsp of low-fat yoghurt
0.6​
1 tsp of Ghee 45 calories
0​
100 gms of Fox-Tail millet 236 cals
57​
GI=50
100 gms of cooked white rice 129 cals
27.9​
GI=68
100 gms of cooked brown rice 111 cals
23.51​
GI=73
100 gms of cooked mung 105 cals
19.15​
GI=25
100 gms of black-eyed beans 116
20.45​
GI=33
100 gms of pigeon split beans 125 cals
20.43​
GI=48
100 gms of cooked red lentils 116 cals
20.13​
GI=21
100 gms of cooked ragi 119 cals
23.67​
GI=64
100 gms of cooked Jowar 120 cals
23.67​
GI=62

It is open for discussion and improvement so that we can have the master catalog. Lentils are not bad, I think. The Quacker oats data needs correction. It is a lot higher.
 
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KennyA

Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
3,002
Type of diabetes
Treatment type
Diet only
Where are you getting your data from? the first half-dozen of your figures conflict with what sites like diet doctor estimate. It seems low for apple and high for walnuts, for example. As we've discussed before, the oats figure is incredibly low.

For walnuts, is it possible that you're using US figures from Wikipedia that might include fibre in the carb count?

have a look at the amounts here: https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/foods
 

Antje77

Oracle
Retired Moderator
Messages
19,564
Type of diabetes
LADA
Treatment type
Insulin
Also, have a look at your peanuts salted/unsalted. Adding a little salt to peanuts doesn't take away a quarter of the carbs in them.
I've had a look at a bag of peanuts and it says 9,7 grams per 100 gr, nowhere near your 15 to 21.
 
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MissMuffett

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,108
Type of diabetes
Type 2
Treatment type
Tablets (oral)
As you say the oats are a lot higher. I quickly searched for Quaker oats on Sainsbury’s website and 100g says 59g of carbs!
 

ianf0ster

Moderator
Staff Member
Messages
2,438
Type of diabetes
Treatment type
Diet only
Dislikes
exercise, phone calls
It is a work in progress. What I have so far is this. The second column is carbs.

100 gms apple has 14 gms carbs and 52 calories
14​
100 gms of unsweetened Soya 38 cals
4​
100 gms cooked Quacker Old fashioned oats 63.4 cals
10.8​
100 gms of Walnuts 654 cals
13.7​
100 gms of salted peanuts 599 calories
15.26​
100 gms of unsalted peanuts 585
21.51​
1 tbsp of low-fat yoghurt
0.6​
1 tsp of Ghee 45 calories
0​
100 gms of Fox-Tail millet 236 cals
57​
GI=50
100 gms of cooked white rice 129 cals
27.9​
GI=68
100 gms of cooked brown rice 111 cals
23.51​
GI=73
100 gms of cooked mung 105 cals
19.15​
GI=25
100 gms of black-eyed beans 116
20.45​
GI=33
100 gms of pigeon split beans 125 cals
20.43​
GI=48
100 gms of cooked red lentils 116 cals
20.13​
GI=21
100 gms of cooked ragi 119 cals
23.67​
GI=64
100 gms of cooked Jowar 120 cals
23.67​
GI=62

It is open for discussion and improvement so that we can have the master catalog. Lentils are not bad, I think. The Quacker oats data needs correction. It is a lot higher.
Initially I paid attention to lists of food items showing many carbs per 100gms and of what their Glycaemic Index (supposedly) was.
But my personal T2D expert soon showed me that all this changes in practice and that different Type 2's digest the same food at different rates.

For example nuts vary considerably because of how much we chew them before swallowing. Hence we extract fewer carbs from whole almond than from the same amount of almond flour or ground almonds.
The same applies to whole oats (or other grains) versus 'instant' oats or grain flours. Fluffy baked potato versus boiled potato. Then baked potato with lashings of butter is different too due to the extra fat slowing the absorption down.

Finally our gut biomes are unique and vary over time, so this too affects how much we absorb from certain foods.

So while I do use lists as an initial guide (where a food new to me) is concerned, but I only trust my personal expert ( my BG meter) to give me the correct advice for me!
 

Resurgam

Expert
Messages
9,880
Type of diabetes
Treatment type
Diet only
Carbs in apple are more usually 11%.
I give myself permission to eat apples from my own trees, as it is so close to the 10% which is the usual maximum.
Carbs in salted peanuts 7.3% - I bought some as I had cramp going to the supermarket today and salt usually sorts it - it did.
I won't have any carbs at dinner though, as I am sure my gut will have found some extra ones in there, as that is usual with legumes for me and a few others who have checked and found the same peculiarity.
 

In Response

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,535
Type of diabetes
Type 1
Treatment type
Pump
A table like this is useful for those of us who count the carbs we eat.
It is definitely useful for those of us who calculate our insulin based on what we eat.
But, as @ianf0ster mentions, we all react differently to those carbs so it is best to test the effect on ourselves.
Even when injecting insulin, different foods can digest at different rates (e.g. pizza) and my body seems to be able to extract more sugar from some than the carb level suggests.
Due to this variation, I don't get hung up on precise carb counting. When one person can react differently to a food than someone else, when some carbs are digested slower than others, when other things that are harder to measure affect our BG (e.g. stress, exercise, illness), when BG meters have a 15% tolerance, ... accuracy is not worth worrying about. It is one approximation on top of another.
I am not suggesting carb counting is a bad idea. But I am suggesting that it is not worth worrying whether apples are 14g carbs, 12g carbs or whether it varies per type of apple, the ripeness of the apple, how much of the skin you eat and how close you get to the core.
 

Omar51

Well-Known Member
Messages
632
Type of diabetes
Prediabetes
Treatment type
Diet only
A table like this is useful for those of us who count the carbs we eat.
It is definitely useful for those of us who calculate our insulin based on what we eat.
But, as @ianf0ster mentions, we all react differently to those carbs so it is best to test the effect on ourselves.
Even when injecting insulin, different foods can digest at different rates (e.g. pizza) and my body seems to be able to extract more sugar from some than the carb level suggests.
Due to this variation, I don't get hung up on precise carb counting. When one person can react differently to a food than someone else, when some carbs are digested slower than others, when other things that are harder to measure affect our BG (e.g. stress, exercise, illness), when BG meters have a 15% tolerance, ... accuracy is not worth worrying about. It is one approximation on top of another.
I am not suggesting carb counting is a bad idea. But I am suggesting that it is not worth worrying whether apples are 14g carbs, 12g carbs or whether it varies per type of apple, the ripeness of the apple, how much of the skin you eat and how close you get to the core.

Here is my compilation too!
Sorry beside walnuts I don’t eat any of those items, I used to but not anymore. It’s a good list, thanks.
-Omar