1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Heyyy. Type1.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by dilpz, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hey im Dilpz, 25 from leicester. I was diagnosed T1 in november 2015. Still all new to this. I was started off on insuman basal but now moved onto insulatard and novorapid. Just wondering what insulin did you guyz start on and how do you go about controlling ur sugar levels as mine are jus all over the place. When i was diagnosed i was in high 20s. Past few weeks ive managed to bring them down to 8/9 and then all of a sudden there shooting back up to 18/19. Has anyone else experienced anything like this?
     
  2. novorapidboi26

    novorapidboi26 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,830
    Likes Received:
    1,853
    Trophy Points:
    178
    back in 1999 I started on Humulin M2, which is a mixed insulin, no longer on the market.....then went on to M3, another mix......it was only in 2009 that I started on the basal/bolus analogue insulin's.....changed my life really....

    I wasn't really taking any control of my sugars until I went on a DAFNE course and learned how to count carbs and adjust my doses.....

    until you start to think about that you wont get control.....so ask your team for some education....

    Even now I can have random single highs or longer periods of highs, so don't worry....:)

    without having your doses correct the exact reason cant be pin pointed......

    its not been long for you though so its very good your asking question now.....welcome aboard.....
     
    • Like Like x 4
  3. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    4,693
    Likes Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi there @dilpz
    welcome to the forum :)

    there is so much to get your head round in the early days.

    some of the most important things in my opinion is to take things 1 day at a time , keep good records of what your bloods are , what you ate , and insulin doses.

    from this information you will start to see patterns and this information along with your diabetic care team can help you to make adjustments.

    I am tagging @daisy1 for her to post her great starter pack -- this is a worthwhile read for all people newly diagnosed.

    All the best !
     
    • Like Like x 2
  4. Gaz-M

    Gaz-M Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,108
    Likes Received:
    1,087
    Trophy Points:
    198
    • Like Like x 2
  5. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    @novorapidboi26
    @himtoo @Gaz-M

    First of all guyz thank you soo much for making the time to read and reply to my post. I really appreciate the support!

    I will be attending a type 1 foundation course at the end of the month. Really looking forward to it.

    I currently do the prick test 4 times a day and i also have the freestyle libre to help me monitor throught the day/night. The results are sent to my specialist nurse every week. She then tweeks my dosage.

    I started off on a basal twice a day, but now im having to inject 2 basals and 2 rapids with the dosage units increasing every week!

    How long did take you guyz for your sugar levels to settle down?

    Also what was your first ever hypo experience like? Im still waiting to have mine.

    Ps thank you for the very warm welcome!
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    26,459
    Likes Received:
    4,873
    Trophy Points:
    248
    @dilpz

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to answer.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  7. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

    Messages:
    17,995
    Likes Received:
    27,105
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hello and welcome, I am on Levemir and NovoRapid now, I have been on Actrapid and Insultartd and I started on a pork Insulin (with syringes) , but tbh I can't remember the name ?
    Good luck and best wishes
    RRB
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,599
    Likes Received:
    2,188
    Trophy Points:
    178
    ImageUploadedByDCUK Forum1454417551.625719.jpg
    My arsenal of glucose snipers.

    Edit- the knives are for cooking though, lol
     
    • Like Like x 8
  9. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

    Messages:
    11,317
    Likes Received:
    6,912
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi and welcome. It sounds like you are not yet carb-counting your Novorapid dosage for each meal? It may be this will be included in your Foundation course. It is important to start carb-counting soon to reduce the risk of large blood sugar swings and give you flexibility in meal patterns. Do discuss with your doc if this isn't included in the course
     
  10. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    @daisy1
    @Robinredbreast
    @TorqPenderloin
    @Daibell

    Thanks for all the info!!!

    No i havent been taught anything about carb-counting. I have just been taking novorapid doses that my nurse has suggested.

    So NICE say 2hrs after a meal sugar levels should be under 9mmol/l. Is this true for you guyz? For me 2hrs after a meal my levels are around 20 if not more.
     
  11. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    4,693
    Likes Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    198
    ok -- so 20 after a meal is too high but also your pre meal blood sugar matters as well.
    if it was 17 pre meal then a rise to 20 is not that drastic if you follow.

    ideally you want your blood sugars to be between 4 and 7 before a meal
    and not to rise above 10 2 hours post meal.

    but sometimes life doesn't always quite work that good.

    if you are getting double figures after most meals from fasting levels below 7 you really should get in touch with your DSN ( Diabetic nurse) to review your readings and what you are eating to make some adjustments to your doses.

    all the best !!
     
  12. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    @himtoo

    My fasting sugar levels in the past few days have been around 9.

    So after being diagnosed i was told to prick 4 times a day. 3before meals and once before bed. So these results the nurse would see and adjust my doses.

    Thanks to the libre i can now show her whats happening with my sugar levels between meals. Along with the 4prick test results.

    My meals are usually 4/5hrs apart. Currently before meals they could be 10/12 (In the past few weeks they were going down to around 7). Then shoot up and stay high for around 3hours then slowly come down.

    Diet wise i have cut down my carb intake and try to eat the same amount of carbs throughout each meal.
     
  13. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Expert

    Messages:
    5,334
    Likes Received:
    3,389
    Trophy Points:
    178
    What are your typical meals?
    IMO if you really want them to come down and keep steady you really need to ditch most carbs. Nearly impossible to get insulin doses there at the same times as carbs to match them.
     
  14. himtoo

    himtoo Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    4,693
    Likes Received:
    5,416
    Trophy Points:
    198
    hi there @dilpz
    sorry for late reply -- been out at a diabetic support group meeting this evening .

    with the libre you will be getting a full picture of the trends of your blood sugar post meal.
    this should assist your DSN to assist you in adjusting your doses quite quickly in real terms.
    i would suggest that you ask if you can have a chat with her at least once a week for the next few weeks -- you can upload your libre results to diasend https://www.diasend.com/en/ and she can either login as you ( if you give her your password) or she may already have the software operating at her clinic.

    the libre should speed up your ability to get to the right doses for you because you have 24 hour real time info to assist.

    all the best !!
     
  15. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    @Kristin251

    Breakfast would be cereal like weetabix.

    Lunch usually a sandwich like ham and lettuce.

    Dinner would be like chicken with veg and a handful of rice or mash.

    Plenty of water throughout the day and i dont have any snacks between meals.

    @himtoo

    I currently email my diabetes nurse every monday with my optium neo results. Ive only had the libre since friday so i sent her the weekend results from that as well. Still awaiting her reply.

    Until using the libre i really didnt know my levels would go soo high post meal, and im sure my DSN wouldnt of known either.

    I typically am in the diabetes clinic every 4-6 weeks. I must say the DSN is a lot more helpful than the doctors!!!

    Thank you all for the support and suggestions! I feel a lot more relaxed knowing im heading in the right direction to get my diabetes under control.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Freefall_Ash

    Freefall_Ash Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Hiya Dilpz,

    I was diagnosed in May 2015. Best few tips I can give in short are swap out your flexpens for a Novopen Echo, which will allow you to inject half units instead of only whole ones, This uses a penfill cartridge instead of being a single use pen, so it's a bit sturdier too. This helped me massively nail matching my dosage to my carb intake, although it might not be as useful if you haven't started carb counting yet - even so I suggest it. Also as others have mentioned carb counting can massively help your control, I learned the basics from my diabetes nurse and found some good tips online and here. I haven't taken a DAFNE course yet but am scheduled for one in June. The more you test and record the better, especially when doing sport or other activities which may affect levels as the results can often be surprising.

    All the best!
     
    • Like Like x 3
  17. ashleighw1993

    ashleighw1993 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I was diagnosed type 1 last week and on novorapid and lantus. At the start my average was anything between 14 and 20. This week its gradually started dropping to between 9 and 12. Past few days I have been spiking anything from 14- low 20s so uncontrolled atm
     
  18. dilpz

    dilpz Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    @ashleighw1993

    Hey, how are you coping with it all?

    Yhh my sugar levels are still all over the place lol. Going to see the DSN soon so hopefully will be able to sort it out.
     
  19. encore1332

    encore1332 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    78
    Trophy Points:
    58
    for the first few weeks I was told to keep a diary of everything I drink and eat and what I injected and times. after a week my nurse started working out my how many units to inject to how much carbohydrate I eat. It was a complete pain to weigh and record everything but within 3 weeks I was on a basic level carb counting and working out what to inject. I wish you good luck. there is a lot of knowledge on this forum .
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook