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High insulin and cortisol

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Jj.j, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    Good morning to everyone here :)

    I've been feeling quite abnormal in the past 3 years getting quite bad symptoms of brain fog, ed and sweating. But recently it got so bad that I went to get my blood checked.

    My results came back like this :

    Glucose 98 mg/dl (74-99)
    FT4 20.7. (12-22)
    FT3 5.3 (3.1-6.8)
    Testosterone 6.14 (2.8-8)

    TSH 4.3 (0.27-4.20) *
    Cortisol AM 714.8 (171-536) *
    Insulin 11 (3-8) *

    I repeated the cortisol test with dexamethasone and it came back good.

    I can tell that my diet in the years before this situation was quite bad and contained a lot of sugar and stress ( was not in stress at the time of the blood tests)
    I've been put on metmorfin twice a day to reduce insulin and have actively started avoiding carbs and being active.

    Could these changes result in the drop of insulin and therefore cortisol which could be causing the brain fog and ED both of which I'm quite motivated to fix ? And how long before I start seeing results considering these steps?


    Thank you very much for any advise
     
  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Metformin does not reduce insulin levels. Cortisol is affected by stress. I suggest you speak with your Health Care Professionals to get a clearer picture.
     
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  3. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    Would it not increase sensitivity and then the levels drop? Thank you for a reply
     
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  4. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Metformin works in the background not on the pancreas (the beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin) but on the liver. It is a mild drug that curbs what is known as liver dumps which is a process by which the glucose is supplied to the body on demand. In those with Pre Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes this process goes on too much and for too long and forces more insulin responses from the pancreas to deal with the splurge of glucose.

    Those with Pre D and T2 have some measure of hyperinsulinaemia so changing one's eating habits has a direct affect on insulin and blood glucose levels and I might add that this change can have the benefit of improving insulin sensitivity over time.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  5. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    So to improve I should focus on changing diet?
     
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  6. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    If you think you have a problem with blood glucose levels and insulin levels then yes, you should appraise the way you eat. A diet that is lower in carbohydrates would be wise. If you would like advice on what a lower carb diet is then we can help. What does your normal diet look like? If you could tell us what you eat in a typical day we may see things that would benefit from change.
     
  7. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    May I ask the results of your HbA1c , please.
     
  8. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    5.7 (3.88-9.0 mmol/L)
     
  9. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    I've been told insulin resistance and high cortisol are linked through is this correct?
     
  10. ianf0ster

    ianf0ster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Jj.j,
    High Insulin is linked to stress hormones. Chronic stress causes High Blood Glucose, which for those with functioning Beta Cells in their pancreas in turn causes High Insulin.
    Both Stress Hormones and Insulin are pro-inflammatory which is also bad for Heart disease, High Blood Pressure and other unwelcome diseases.

    In my opinion, the two most important sayings in here are:
    1. You can't outrun a poor diet. - Meaning what you eat is more important than how much gym work you put in.
    2. Eat to your meter. - which probably doesn't apply to you so much since your BG and HbA1C are relatively low. But what it means (for those of us firmly into the diabetic rather than pre-diabetic range) is that the best diet is one which doesn't spike your Blood Glucose (and hence your Insulin). So testing, using a cheap Blood Glucose meter, which foods are OK for you and which aren't is important for us because each person has a personal gut microbiome and hence processes carbs and different carbs in a slightly different way.
     
  11. Wojciechu

    Wojciechu Other · Well-Known Member

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    Cortisol counteracts insulin, yes. It stimulates gluconeogenesis and inhibits the use of glucose.

    That’s why glucocorticosteroids, popular anti-inflammatory medications for autoimmune diseases and allergies, commonly known as steroids are „deadly” for diabetics. They make blood sugars skyrocket. They even can cause diabetes in non-diabetics. It happened to me.
     
  12. Jj.j

    Jj.j · Member

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    So by following a good diet, taking this pill and avoiding the spikes and stress I should return to normal bodily function?
     
  13. RochelleCocco

    RochelleCocco · Newbie

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    As well improving diet, it is a good idea to optimize sleep. Sleep deprivation, erratic sleep schedule, waking still feeling tired, is stressful in itself and can cause high cortisol, higher fasting glucose, and brain fog. (When I don't get enough sleep, I automatically go for the junk food too.)
     
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  14. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    A good diet is often a matter of opinion.
    A good diet for me is no grains or root vegetables. No seeds like quinoa, chia, flax or even pumpkin.
    I can have full fat dairy, meat, leafy green vegetables. A few tomatoes, cucumbers, mushrooms and my BG levels have been in non diabetic range for three years.
     
  15. Sangre

    Sangre Type 2 · Member

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    Eat low carb, exercise (it doesn’t have to be grueling exercise, but get your heart rate up for 20-30 min a day), destress, and take phosphatydl choline for the brain fog.
     
  16. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why no seeds?
     
  17. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    I find the fibre in seeds and nuts messes with my digestion and quinoa still spikes my BG.
     
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  18. Flora123

    Flora123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. Just wanted to check in case I’d missed something. I can’t eat quinoa but flax and other seeds seem ok.... so far!
     
  19. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    It’s all so personal isn’t? The only way to know is to experiment and test with a meter.
     
  20. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Have you read the Adrenal Reset Diet by Alan Christianson ? It explains how a problem with the adrenal glands and high cortisol can mimic other conditions...especially thyroid conditions but also other conditions too, so that even when other glands are doing their job perfectly it may seem that they are not working properly as the adrenal glands don't let their hormones into their cells.

    Your Hba1c isn't awful. I would consider reading this book before throwing yourself into treating diabetes when other conditions may need attention first in your case. Your thyroid is just about keeping up for now...but i like to see a lower TSH than 4.3...although you can't really tell alot from a single thyroid test. It can take 9 or more to get the real picture.

    Speak to your doctors, they are best placed to advise you and they will have a more full picture of what is going on.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #20 zand, Nov 14, 2019 at 3:16 PM
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
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