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How can I reduce my insulin resistance?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by jm164441, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. jm164441

    jm164441 · Member

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    I've lost 35 lbs since September. my fasting has gone down from 83 to 78 but my postprandial continues to spike hard, to the point even 20g carb will take me from 78 to 130 @ 1hr. Yet my blood sugar generally doesn't go above 165-170, even if I eat 100g carb, is that normal?

    until recently, I had assumed that insulin resistance was something that would be 100% reversed as soon as I dropped the pounds, is that not the case? or is the lack of my improvement in postprandial numbers due to insulin insufficiency?

    in case you think my numbers are too good to be worried about, I have neuropathy that gets worse EVERY time my blood sugar goes higher than ~125.
     
  2. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I lost 25 kilo's over the course of 2 years, and if I eat 20 grams of carbs in one sitting, I will spike. So I just have 20 grams or less a day. (If I went for 100 grams a day, my numbers would be horrid). From what I understand, insulin resistance can improve a little with weight loss, but reverse entirely...? Not that I know of... The weight most likely came on because of insulin resistance, after all, before it crossed the threshhold into T2 territory. It was there before the weight, in other words.

    You could try going lower carb, into keto? Only mentioning it because of the neuropathy, as it's not for everyone.
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Speaking as a type 1 on insulin, I find exercise is the best way to kick any insulin resistance into touch, it's getting the body moving and the cells working that seems to help utilise insulin more efficiently.
     
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  4. Roulis

    Roulis Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I haven't got the full picture as yet, as I've only started getting into weight training program, If anything, resistance training - at least in theory - should help with improving insulin sensitivity. If I am still around by next summer, I should be able to have some personal data/experience of/if any impact/relation of weight training and insulin sensitivity to share with the community. All the best wishes! Theo.
     
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    #4 Roulis, Dec 11, 2018 at 11:11 AM
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
  5. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you’re drip feeding yourself carbohydrate from a position where you already had/have neuropathy, then it will take a very long time to improve your insulin sensitivity, if it’s even possible. The only way you’re going to make meaningful improvement is through very low carb and intermittent fasting in order to purge several years worth of excess glucose from your system. Been there done that. Also had crippling neuropathy in my feet that would get worse if my glucose went over 7.0mmol/L.

    I appreciate that some will view my comments as sweeping statements, but it seems I was in a very similar position to yourself before LCHF and IF got rid of the diabetes and the neuropathy.
     
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  6. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Ha! I forgot about excersize! Mostly because I don't do much of it, if any, haha. (Walking on the weekends with loads of camera-gear doesn't count, I suppose...)

    Still coming off painkillers, so not the brightest bulb right now, sorry.
     
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  7. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    And yes! Exercise and lifting weights will bring about gains in insulin sensitivity :)
     
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  8. sonia2016

    sonia2016 Type 2 · Member

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    I went on a low carb diet (Atkins) when I was diagnosed with T2 three years ago. Lost weight and got my A1c down to 38, but I haven't found that I can eat any more carbs now. If I ate 20g carbs it would still spike my blood sugar over 140mg. Also I was on Metformin initially but had to stop taking it last year for various medical reasons and since then have very slowly gained 7 Kg. So I am assuming my insulin resistance has not changed. I have started keeping my food intake to within an 8 hour window and fasting for 16 hours a day, and I have lost 1 Kg so I am hoping this may help. Also trying to exercise more but difficult as I am old, arthritic and don't particularly like it, lol. Anyway good luck with your low carb journey.
     
  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion Atkins isn’t optimal for improving insulin sensitivity or reversing diabetes, owing to the promotion of excess amino acids being converted into glucose. Each to their own of course, I’m not saying it’s not effective or that it’s a bad choice, but a diet very high in protein is not the very best way to minimise insulin secretion.

    I am very much aware that there are lots of views out there that contradict my own, but I’ll take my own personal experience, and the views of Mark Sisson, Jason Fung and Tim Noakes over anyone else’s :)
     
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  10. sonia2016

    sonia2016 Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for your input. I agree with you about the high protein intake. I have Stage 3a kidney impairment with an eGFR result, which is, in the words of my GP "rather up and down". The eGFR trending down, my age and a family history of renal failure were the reasons the Metformin was stopped. Perhaps I should say modified Atkins now, as I am trying to reduce protein intake too. I am still overweight so feel I should watch the fat intake. I also stopped taking Statins in case that was affecting the kidneys. It's a difficult balance and everyone's experience is a bit different. On the plus side I eat far more green vegetables and salad than I did before diagnosis.
     
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