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how do you accept it?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by claymic, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Here you are, a list of what you are entitled to. If your surgery will not provide them then, as Diabell says,you have the right to go to a specialist clinic. They should be part of the care that your surgery arranges for you.
    http://www.diabetes.org.uk/upload/About ... cklist.pdf
     
  2. robertwt

    robertwt Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi distinguished Forum,
    I have Type 1 diabetes. I used to be Type 2 but the alarming amounts of insulin I take have tilted the balance into Type 1. I was diagnosed in 1996 after a goodly portion of my wife's wonderful tirimisu. Pudding - doctor - Blood Test - BG 20+ and that was it)
    So there!
    I look at (and accept) my condition in one of three ways:
    #1 - I have a diagnosis of diabetes
    #2 - I am a diabetic
    #3 - I suffer from diabetes.
    I think that I lean most heavily on the first. I do use #2 to introduce myself to other people (particularly when injecting in a public place) (only one verbally violent objection so far - in a restaurant - when it was suggeted that I use the toilets. I refused and pointed out the health risks involved and asked whether she would ask her doctor to use the loos next time she had a flu jab etc. End of!) :lol: )

    Which brings us to #3. Do I suffer with my diabetes? I eat pretty much what I want, within reason, following a fairly high fibre diet. blood tests - just a little pinprick - usually no sensation at all. My injections - Injection technology (thin, thin, thin needles) are painless and not re-used - and the odd blood test (3 or 4 times a year) are so painless that I take perverse pleasure watching the needle dive beneath my skin). When I was in hospital with cancer (clear now and fully discharged) in 2006, I even did the old fashioned injection - taking over from the nurses to inject myself. That was a matter of pride and OWNERSHIP.

    THAT'S how I accept my diabetes. I own it. Like I own my hears and lungs and gall bladder (oops - that went earlier this month). As owner I have a vested interest to maintain it in the best way I know how. Seeing the control of the condition as a necessary part of my daily life: watching my diet; exercising moderately; remembering medications and insulin; testing; turning up for Clinic and Doctor's appointments.

    So I accept that I suffer from diabetes, that I am a diabetic but really, all that I am is a person with a diagnosis of diabetes.

    and no, I ain't no plaster saint - my BG bounces up from time to time but in general it behaves itself

    Robert WT

    Novorapid 6 i/u breakfast and lunch; 8 i/u dinner
    Levemir 70 i/u morning and 68 i/u evening
    Metformin 850 mg 3 times a day
    Various other pills and potions (somewhere arount 16 tabs/day at last count) (for other bits of my owner-occupier body)
     
  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    Thank you. I have printed the list out and made an appointment to see my doctor. The earliest appointment I can get is 21st March.

    This forum is helping to make everything seem more bearable.
     
  4. KeithnrBath

    KeithnrBath · Member

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    Felt low at first but, after 18mths, now accept not to eat swets and cakes,,,,except occassionally!
    I know people who ignore it....thay only have it slightly!!!!!!!!! They will find out eventually NOT to ignore it.
    LOOK ON THE BRIGHT SIDE, I have lost 3 friends in the past year to MN. They could do nothing to help themselves.
    We take tablets and go without some foods..or eat sensible, Big deal :roll:
     
  5. 961julieg

    961julieg · Newbie

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    Hi there, ive just read some of your posts on accepting diabetes. Well im finding it extremely hard. 12 years ago i had a liver transplant, so i was advised not to drink, which i dont anymore, and take immunosuppressants to stop rejection. 7 years ago i gave up smoking because of my blood pressure ( which im also on medication for). I live on my own as my marriage broke up 17 years ago, (no medication for that!, but no sex either). Now i have tytpe 2 diabetes which i take Metformin for, and now i cant have my sweet treats. What in heavens name is there for me now????.
     
  6. kpa1979

    kpa1979 · Newbie

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    i've been a diabetic from i was 3.5 months old so i've
    had no other choice but to accept it. i tried fighting it when i was younger but i just kept ending up in hospital which i hated so i made choice to accept it and try to work with it. everyday is different i have good and bad days but since i got the pump its been alot more good days.
     
  7. FatCatAnna

    FatCatAnna Type 1 · Member

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    I've had diabetes since I was 6 and this year am going into my 45th year with diabetes. I guess sometimes for those of us who get it when we are younger - it's easier to accept then when you get it later in life. I just know, I don't know any other way of life, for me, it's normal for me (and what is a normal life :?: ).

    I find now with all the social forums out in our big blue marble as well - that it is nice to share our ups/downs - or like my Facebook page is entitled - The Roller Coaster Ride of Diabetes (I love roller coasters by the way LOL) - we can learn off of each other - and get through some of the crappola that gets handed to us - whether it be diabetes oriented or not (like for example I'm going thru' menopause right now - emotional basket case :crazy: - fluctuations of blood glucose - insulin requirements - expanding stomach / hips ... waaaaaahhhhhh LOL).

    I'm really lucky that I had parents that didn't make a big deal out of me having diabetes - they made me very independent of how I took care of my diabetes. Yes, I did ****** up things as a teenager - going into :oops: DKA for 3 days - but I learned a big lesson there - that you can't play around with your health.

    Hoping that overtime - any one who is young reading this - and feels like it's the worst :x case scenario to have hit you - remember this - a young friend of mine - Jenna - died :cry: of cancer a few years ago. She was on a pump for her pain meds - and we would laugh when we would "pump" up our legal drugs. Her last year of life, she made the most of it, but if I could have exchanged my life to her - she would have been alive today - she'd now be 19!

    There are far worse things out there in life that can affect you - and I think it's how you set your noggin :lolno: at how you approach things in life that make it easier to accept what gets flung at you.

    Cheerio from Canada!

    Anna aka FatCatAnna >^,,^<
     
  8. SteveI

    SteveI · Newbie

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    I'm a diabetic 'oldie' diagnosed with Type 1 in 1965. I empathise with the feelings of people struggling to accept it, and sometimes I get very p****d off with it but then I remind myself that having it is better than the alternative! 100 years ago I would have had to accept dying very young and I see the NHS keeping me going as a privilege, not something I have to 'accept'. Sorry if this sounds unsympathetic but we are lucky to be still here.
     
  9. jgibson1962

    jgibson1962 · Active Member

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    I couldn't agree with you more. Its a shame society as a whole didnt have your attitude.
     
  10. alanbrewerton

    alanbrewerton · Newbie

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    Hi - I've had type 2 for 16 years. Since I was 54. I found it difficult to accept because I was always fit and not overweight so it was rather a shock - but I have learned to cope. The problem is that whatever you do it gets worse. Fortunately I am able to control glucose levels pretty well using tablets - it's the constant pressure which is difficult - can I eat that? will it affect my sugar level? I have much better control now by reducing carbohydrates - bread and potatoes - which is not a particular chore. It's partly psychological - I've always refused to allow it to significantly affect my lifestyle and enjoy life as a result. Keeping fit is half the battle. I agree with Steve - it is a privilege to have NHS treatment. We are very lucky to be here. It costs a pal of mine in the USA a fortune - his insurance will only cover certain elements - NOT his drugs which are very expensive. Count your blessings - enjoy life. It's interesting to note that there is a drug available - yet to be accepted by NICE - which requires 1 injection per day - you can eat/drink what you like etc. - it locks on to the protein which prevents type 2 sufferers from using their insulin thus ensuring that one's insulin is used properly. Type 2s need to make sure that NICE agrees to us having it.

    Alan B
     
  11. Kansenji

    Kansenji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Become an "expert patient".

    I must be quite strange as I was completely unperturbed when diagnosed with diabetes nearly six years ago. Worried looking Health Care Professionals (HCPs) kept asking me "how do you feel about being told you have diabetes?"; I couldn't understand what all the fuss was about, nor can I understand it now. My reply was "it's just another medical condition to add to the 22 medical conditions that I already have". Since then, two more endocrine medical conditions have been added to my tally; Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome and potentially the most serious of all, Addison's Disease (Primary Hypoadrenalism). All diabetics should be aware that they stand a good chance of acquiring other failures of their endocrine system.

    My defining health problem is severe back pain; I have lived with that for at least 55 years (since I started school at 5 years of age) and it is caused by a malformed L5 lumbar bone prolapsing a disc. The pain has severely worsened with age and I've gradually become less mobile and less active; now I can barely walk. The result is that I have relentlessly gained weight over the past 15 years and that is possibly what triggered the diabetes.

    I have discovered that it is essential to be proactive when dealing with one's own diabetes treatment; one needs to become an "expert patient" as most of the HCPs are confused and have a tendency to contradict each other. The patient needs to constantly research their condition, ask HCPs probing questions and make sure that their health conditions and medications are frequently reviewed.

    My own diabetes is complicated by the Addison's disease; Metformin and Gliclazide had absolutely no effect on me and my BG steadily worsened. I was put on insulin at 16 units per day and I regained normal BG when I peaked at 1,100 units per day. I meticulously check my BG four times per day and adjust my insulin dosage accordingly, also taking account of the amount of food I am about to eat. I've now realised that, as I can do so little exercise, I can only use calorie reduction as a means to reduce weight and BG. I now inject Liraglutide (Victoza) too and managed to reduce my insulin dosage to an average of about 370 units per day. To do that, I've had to reduce my calorific intake from about 1200 calories per day to about 800 calories per day (about 30% of the recommended intake for a man). THAT just goes to glaringly clarify the contradictory advice given to me. The dietitian told me that I needed to INCREASE my food intake to at least 2,000 calories per day "for the good of my health"; My GP said that that advice was wrong & that I needed to REDUCE my food intake further. He could not believe that I could eat so little & have such a big belly! :lol:

    No matter how bad your health is, you must accept that there are always other people who have got it worse; there is no point in worrying about your health, just deal with it in a methodical manner as you would deal with any other problem that life throws at you. Controlling BG is crucial to stop future organ failure and to stop bits & pieces falling off. :lolno:
     
  12. baldpaul

    baldpaul · Newbie

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    I dont bother with it and dont care i very rarely take my insulin my sugar is always around 30 or hi i just get on with life.
     
  13. SAMURAI55

    SAMURAI55 · Newbie

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    I was diagnosed at the age of 3 in 1958, when things were totally different for young diabetics. On starting school a year later,it was very difficult to understand why the other kids had sweets and chocolate, and i couldn't. but over the years that followed,i began to accept and come to terms with it, and went on to live a fairly normal life. i now have 3 kids,who are all diabetes free.Many years ago,I decided on the philosophy of you either control diabetes or it will control you.So providing you take care of yourself and moniter yourself regulally, you should be fine...ANDY
     
  14. GranRita

    GranRita · Member

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    Hi! I think things get easier, as you come to accept this thing is for life. I find the challenge in keeping my BG as low as possible My readings, each morning are now, usually 6.3 - 7.0 Odd times even 5.7!!! Gosh. Started out at 16.8 2years ago. It is a help to do a weekly average. Mine is staying around the 6.8 mark, so I know that, if one day we have 7.5 & another 6.2 the overall score is not too bad. I find this, along with a healthy diet, keeps things ticking over nicely. & I do not allow T2 to interfere with my social life. We go dancing 3 times a week. It is a thing we just have to get used to. Hang in there !!!!!!!!!
     
  15. bonnynemia

    bonnynemia · Active Member

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    Please understand that I am not a medical doctor nor an expert on type 2 diabetes. I am just a plain type 2 diabetic diagnosed in July 1991 based on a fasting sugar reading of 468 mg/dl (I live in Michigan USA).

    What I will say here should not shock anybody because I have always been a big gambler, meaning that I either win big or lose big.

    I believed that I became diabetic because of (1) bad foods I had been eating (fast food junks), and (2) my being very lazy physically. I told myself that by going on the reverse, I would be able to manage my diabetes successfully.

    Our family physician required me to take several anti-diabetes pills. I refused, asking him to allow me to do 'my way'. He then required me to pass a stress test first. Immediately after passing the stress test, I started running the stairs in our house a total of 2 hours/day (in as many as 8 sessions/day). In a matter of 10 days, the blood sugar readings I was getting were already in the 130 mg/dl range. As required, I reported to our family doctor the results I was getting. He said to continue doing it.

    Long story short, going 21 years, I have been as healthy, strong, and happy as I can ever be. My past A1c's were between 5.2% and 6.3%. I have never had any diabetes complications, have never had any hypoglycemic episode, have always been using exercise as my only anti-diabetes medication (the original total daily exercise time of 2 hours was down to 30 minutes, up to 45 minutes, up to 1 hour, and up again to 90 minutes). The heart-healthy, natural, fresh (raw or cooked), unprocessed, and whole foods I have been eating which are mostly carbohydrates have not been considered as a part of my diabetes control method. Carbohydrates are well known for causing high fasting and high after-meal blood sugar readings.

    To understand me better, please google my name: Bonny Damocles, and read some entries you find.
     
  16. Chrispp

    Chrispp · Member

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    My wife has Type 1 diabetes ad never had Type 2. She was taken seriously ill 14 years ago aged 47 and was rushed to hospital and diagnosed with Type 1 and straight on to insulin. Living with and sharing my life with wife and her diabetes I found it very annoying to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 3 years ago having followed her good diet and a regular exercise routine.
    I've brought this up here before, as far as I'm concerned I have diabetes I am not a diabetic.
    I was annoyed and angry to be diagnosed with type 2, as I live with my wifes diabetes regime I was completely P------ off. I was even more angry with my doctors and diabetes nurses who suggested trying diet control for a month and then going back for tablet prescription.
    Diabetes can have extreme affects on us all, I refused to accept medication. This may sound dangerous to some, but my choice was to take EXTREME action myself. All though I was already on a low sugar diet, I removed all sweet things from my diet. All Biscuit, Cake, Chocolate etc were instantly removed from my eating regime. Bread intake cut to a minimal amount along with tiny amounts of rice and pasta with meals. I went on to a small unsweetened cereal breakfast with skimmed milk and only one coffee a day, totally vegetarian salad lunches with a little dressing with chilli, my evening meals went to very minimal carbs, minimal amounts of meat and plenty of chilli/curry with mainly vegetables. I never went back to the doctors for some months, I cut out as much as possible that could send sugar levels soaring and upped my exercise routine a bit.
    Back with the docs after a few months, my blood glucose tests came back just a tad above borderline normal and my BMI had gone from 28/29 to 25 and now around 23, although a little annoyed with me the medico's gave me a few more months on my own EXTREME action, which the doctor judged as a healthy diet. My blood tests then came back as normal. I have a blood glucose monitor and have been advised to test now and again and still I have normal non diabetes results.
    The medico's tell me that tests confirmed me as having diabetes and that diagnosis stands for ever. Home made curry's and chilli laced meals without the fats and gee stem my appetite. My food intake is minimal but enough to keep me healthy. Green Teas and the one Coffee with milk a day and lots of water to drink have worked for me.
    At first in the first few weeks my stomach screamed with hunger and what I did was extreme but controlled and carefully researched, I don't need type 2 tablets and I'm fit and healthy, I get offered the odd biscuit or piece of cake and even the odd sweet and I never eat them. My intake of those sort of foods was mot much before. It may be extreme to cut them out all together, but I'm not taking medication and my blood glucose level reads normal again today. I'm lighter than I was aged 16 and no longer have knee and leg problems.
    I look at Diabetes as something that could have an extreme affect on my life, so far I've taken extreme action against it and 3 years on and I'm ok. Sitting in our local hospital whilst my wife has her routine eye checks and a string of diabetes patients are laughing as they buy chocolate bars and crisps from the trolley with little laughs and chuckles and a bunch of "we're not mean to eat these, ho ho, ha ha, hee hee" comments leaves me wondering, Seeing an overweight new amputee tucking in to a large Mars bar with her poor daughter giving a helpless look and a shake of her head as her mum devours her "only treat" as she waits for retinopathy treatment makes me shudder.
    I may still end up on type 2 tablets or insulin in time, but Diabetes has a FIGHT on its hands all the way in this corner. And I'll continue too treat the extreme possibilities with extreme.
     
  17. DaveinSpain

    DaveinSpain · Newbie

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    It has taken me about 12 years to accept I am Type 2 diabetic controlled by medication and diet. I am now aged 64. During that time I have gone throught denial - I feel fine, I can't be diabetic. I have seen my father, who was diabetic and on insulin, die from kidney problems resulting from his diabetes. He also had heart and eye problems.
    In September 2010 I was diagnosed with prostate cancer and undertook a course of radiotherapy and am now clear. Beating the cancer, and the threat of my having to start using insulin, gave me the initiative to start fighting back.
    In January 2012 I started a low carb diet similar to the type offered through Slimming World, and I am trying to exercise more (they have built a new gym in our village but such is the state of Spanish finances, they can't afford the equipment to go in it). This has led to a weight loss of 16 pounds in 8 weeks (only 45 to go) and control over my blood sugar level. The immediate threat of having to start on insulin has been postponed, as has my referral to an Endocrinologist at the hospital.
    I still have to see an Opthalmologist next week. and my next blood test is at the end of April.
    I drink black, unsweetened coffee and the odd. brandy. And water. I have bacon & egg or porridge for breakfast (except for Saturday when I have a bacon roll in a local cafe). That roll is the only bread I have all week. I have a salad with cold meat, cottage cheese or egg - hard boiled or pickled, for lunch. For dinner my potatoes are carefully weighed, plenty of vegetables and meat or fish. Having fish & chips tonight, cooked in the oven, not fried.
    I miss the red wine, cheap and plentiful here, but feel the benefits of only having the very occasional glass. My daily treat, with a coffee, is a digestive biscuit. Only having the one really helps me to savour and enjoy the treat.
     
  18. yinkoos

    yinkoos · Newbie

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    At the age of 9 I watched my father die of multiple organ failure after battling diabetes 2 for 11 years. He was my entire world . I watched a mighty and proud man destroyed by diabetes, he had a massive stroke on 20th September 1968 and died 9 days later. The loss of my father created a turmoil in my family life. It left my mother penniless and vulnerable; mind you this is Africa, I with seven siblings and a 33year old mother.
    From a very young age I was introduced to the cruelest of the cruel diseases. Diabetes is like a war general and the way it deploys other diseases and complications to wear down your natural body defences and immunity is what makes it dreadful.
    I prepared for diabetes 2 from the age of 9 and the first symptons arrived promptly when I turned 40, frequent urinations at night and erectile malfunction. I said to myself 'at I'm lucky I am in England where this disease can be managed better' I have had immense support and help from various health professionals deployed to help you manage diabetes, but despite all these helps the diseases have made steady progress in the 12 years since I have had it. I did not get any sympathy from ignorant people who blame me for the cause of my own diabetes because I eat two much sugar. Any type 2 diabetic knows that the first thing to give up is sugar of every shape or form.
    Currently I suffer from all spectrums of diabetic complications ranging from shoulder pains, blurry/ deteriorating visions, chronic fatigue, etc. I have had illnesses like liver abcess and pancreatitis when even consultants who should know better thought it was down to my drinking alchohol which I hardly ever touch. The various forms and guises with which diabetes 2 attack you can fool even the best professional. I have had stroke which thankfully was ischemic/transient so the effect is not too bad.
    Having read all this I can tell you that the only part of diabetes that I accept is understanding my father's ordeal because when he had it I was young and did not understand why he died at a relatively young age of 52.
    I do not accept diabetes in any other form. I just cope with diabetes and accept all the helps that I can from the health professionals who are deployed to aid you in containing this dreadful illness.
    I am now 53 years just to put things in perspective 1 year further than my dad lived and have faced every war diabetes has waged on me so far.
    on me so far.
     
  19. outlaw

    outlaw · Newbie

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    I have been diagnosed type 2 for approx 2 years. I am 51 years of age. When I was was first diagnosed I was gutted initially. Once I had control of my sugar levels and got rid of all the problems I had with high blood sugar levels I turned it to my advantage. Although I felt comfortable with my eating life style (I was one of these yo yo dieters) I took this condition as a wake up call and have cut right down on all the wrong foods and increased my physical activities. I feel a lot better because of this. On the down side my biggest problem is remembering to take my medication (and that is no big deal as i do not forget that often) Whilst I am in control I accept it and get on with my life. For all of you out there that have more complications than I. I do sympathise with you all and in no way does this message have any patronizing undertones or other ideas/thoughts that could be taken the wrong way. I count myself lucky that I only have type 2 and at the moment it seems easy to control and does not impact to much on my life. Should that change then who knows.
     
  20. steve451

    steve451 · Member

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    Hi. I was officially diagnosed last December although I had been aware for some time that I was heading that way. I was glucose intolerant which was controlled by diet alone, but when I was given Simvastatin my BG started rising dramatically, and once the other side effects kicked in I dropped the statins, but the damage was done and my BG remained high, then started climbing again up to a high of 32mmol/L fasting, and massive weight gain. ( I am sure I am one of those people with the statin induced diabetes the FDA are now warning about)

    As I had been monitoring my own BG and had read as much as I could about type 2 it came as no surprise to me when the confirmation came - I had done most of the work on the Docs behalf already.

    But I looked on it as fresh start. Since starting on metformin the weight I had gained over the last 8 months has nearly gone. I feel better than I have done in years. I have taken to 2 wheels, buying a good old Raleigh bike for local trips, then adding a motorbike to this, something I'd always wanted. I am now looking at learning to scuba dive. I still enjoy a good curry once a week, complete with rice and naan bread, and eat lunch out a couple of times a week. I actually feel good getting up in the mornings now instead of thinking "here we go again". I really feel I will live a hell of lot longer with the disease than without it!

    Enough for now - I'm off out for lunch then a ride round the park this afternoon if the rain holds off.
     
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