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Type 1 How long do carbohydrates stay in the gut?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by DanisV, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. DanisV

    DanisV Type 1 · Active Member

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    Might be a funny question, but just like the title:

    How long do carbohydrates stay in the body gut, I mean how long until they are digested (normally without any fats or proteins) ?

    Thanx!
     
  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    It depends.

    It depends on the digestion of the person.
    It depends on the glycaemic index of the carbs.
    Some carbs (e.g. pure sugar) break down quickly. Some (e.g. pulses) break down slower.
     
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  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Simple carbs with a high glycemic index will show up in your blood glucose level within approximately 15 minutes.

    Complex carbs with a low glycemic index will take about 15 to 30 minutes to elevate your glucose levels.

    Your question suggests that you want to know how long it takes for digestion to be completed and I'd answer by saying that it depends how much carbohydrate you eat and you activity levels! You might find that other forum members will provide you with a better answer.
     
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  4. DanisV

    DanisV Type 1 · Active Member

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    @urbanracer, @helensaramay : what I was thinking what if someone eats enough fats, then the fats prolong carbs intake into the bloodstream, and if it would be possible that it prolongs so much that material with carbs simply naturally "leaves" the body until the fats are absorbed, then it might be that no blood sugar is raised dramatically at all or I am wrong ?!?!
     
  5. karen8967

    karen8967 Type 1 · Expert

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    hi danisV when we eat high fat along side carbs is does slow the carbs down but if your on a basal/bolus regime your your blood sugar will rise later rather than sooner and a si have found sometimes the rise is just when bolus insulin is tailing off so i need to inject again hope this makes sense :)
     
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  6. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Not quite. The sugars will still be absorbed but slower. Result will be that the rise will be lower but for longer. Think of it as area under the curve will be about the same if you were to plot it on a graph.
     
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  7. DanisV

    DanisV Type 1 · Active Member

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    @Crocodile : then does that mean it is always better to add some fats and to prolong the effect? If the impact is lower but still there, the one should have enough time to "prepare" and inject bolus like prolonged (i.e. 4 hrs). The benefit would be to have lower blood sugar but the struggle for the 4 hrs to get rid of it.But at least no peaks would be seen (>= 10)? Is that correct?
     
  8. There is no Spoon

    There is no Spoon I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    "I mean how long until they are digested" quote button not working :meh:

    I read somewhere it takes 6 hours to digest a meal, don't know what is being classed as a meal in these terms but this feel about right to me. If I eat something low carb I'm good for at least 6 hours before I feel hungry.
    If I eat some thing high carb 3- 4 hours before I feel hungry, which is the advice they give out at Dr's eat every 4 hours. I can feel the need to snack on something before that 4 hours is up.
    If that helps.

    "what I was thinking what if someone eats enough fats, then the fats prolong carbs intake into the bloodstream, "
    I see where your gong here like drinking on an empty stomach will get you drunk faster that drinking with a meal.

    But the argument would be either way your still drinking an will get drunk, just one way takes longer, for you to feel it or perhaps better in reverse the other way you feel it faster. :joyful:
    Taking the analogy a step further drinking on a full stomach would allow you to drink more as its taking longer to get falling down drunk so you could argue that this way is even worse for you. :banghead:

    Sorry I'm fairly ignorant when it comes to T1 issues but my only question would be is it better to slow down absorption of carbohydrates as your thinking or to cut down quantity of carbs as in my case as T2. ;)
    :bag:
     
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  9. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Danis,
    I can't answer that for you as you are a Type 1 and I'm Type 2. Yours' will depend on when and how much insulin you inject and how long the effect of the insulin lasts. It's not so easy unfortunately. In my case it does stop the high spikes but leaves them above pre-meal levels for longer.
    Glenn
     
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  10. DanisV

    DanisV Type 1 · Active Member

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    So the carbs are always sucked into the organism, no matter what? I thought if we would eat more fats, due to the prolonged digestion it would reach the end station, then all the materials containing carbs would "leave" the body without any impact on the BS, but I guess one cannot trick the death ......:sorry:
     
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