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I am NOT a diabetic ...

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by mattrix, Mar 10, 2021.

  1. mattrix

    mattrix LADA · Active Member

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    I am a person, a person with diabetes.

    I am not defined by my disease. You would not call someone with cancer a tumor.

    Just a pet peive, Change the language!
     
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    #1 mattrix, Mar 10, 2021 at 4:41 AM
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2021
  2. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    There seem to be quite a few on this forum who dislike being called a diabetic, so you aren't alone.

    I am quite happy being called a diabetic or a person with diabetes. It doesn't really change anything if you change the language, my body is still carb intolerant. I still have insulin resistance. I have other labels too, a mother, a grandmother etc. The diabetic one is just another.

    My son is asthmatic, that doesn't define him. My coeliac friend doesn't bother about that label either. I don't see why diabetes is any different. I have been called much worse than 'diabetic' in my time!
     
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  3. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Having been arrested in Milan for carrying syringes and "drugs" in 1978, had I not had an instantly recognisable label I might not have gone on my way within 30 minutes. Condition is a less emotive word than disease. The language is loaded with history. The ancient Egyptians knew about it from sweet tasting urine and the word itself is ancient Greek meaning passing through, again referring to sugar in urine. Although I am an ex diabetic I am proud to have been a member of the clan.
     
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  4. mattrix

    mattrix LADA · Active Member

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    I don't mind being refered to as having diabetes. And I have other conditions as well.

    People who call me 'diabetic' are generally being dismissive, "You are a diabetic, that tells me all I need to know about you"
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Doesn't that say rather more about them than anything else?
     
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  6. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Wouldn't the same people say 'You have diabetes, that tells me all I need to know about you" ? If people want to judge you by just one facet of your life they will.
     
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  7. mattrix

    mattrix LADA · Active Member

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    What happened to the other reply?
    Can you delete posts?
     
    #7 mattrix, Mar 10, 2021 at 10:53 AM
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2021
  8. jaywak

    jaywak Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Getting stressed out can upset your diabetes you know !
     
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  9. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @mattrix I completely agree with you.
    Calling me a "diabetic" suggests that's all I am. Saying I "have diabetes" says it is one of the things about me,

    Language is very important and can make a huge difference in the way we are treated, the way we treat the condition and the way we treat ourselves.
    My biggest bugbear, even bigger than being called a diabetic is "controlling" diabetes. Most of us know there are times when diabetes just does its own thing - we have hypos we can't explain, we have highs due to illness or stress. Does anyone suggest we "control our vomiting" when we are sick or, to use your example "control our tumour" if we have cancer?
    The reason this really upsets me is the high incident of mental health problems amongst people with diabetes. Putting the additional unnecessary burden of feeling the need to constantly "control" our diabetes, is adding to the mental health problems.
    A simple change to "manage diabetes" is easy, it reduces the burden and helps us appreciate it is not always possible to keep our blood sugars in perfect control. A manager of people is never going to be in complete control of their staff - it is not a manager's fault if one of their employees steals form the company but it could be thought of their fault if the manager does not notice it and do something about it.

    Sorry @mattrix for jumping on your important thread - thank you for raising it. Others don't think language is important, I do!
     
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    #9 In Response, Mar 10, 2021 at 11:12 AM
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2021
  10. mattrix

    mattrix LADA · Active Member

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    @In Response not a problem.
    I agree. You put it better than I did.

    Also I'm often referred to as "A diabetic with dislipidemia" Grrrrr
     
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  11. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Try being told ' you are diabetic, you need to eat less, it's your own fault' The word 'diabetic ' was not one of the words that harmed my mental health even though I had not yet been diagnosed.
     
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  12. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    In other words... here's the statins?;)
     
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  13. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    I am diabetic. I am asthmatic. I am grey haired. I am freckled.

    These are just words that are used to describe parts of me. They are not my total or inner person. I am fine with them.
     
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  14. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    Someone else here mistaken for a "junkie" back in my student years..
    I don't see the "word" a major issue in the grand scheme of things.

    Incidentally, I've also been mistakenly targeted for homophobia too. Keep em guessing & fight yer way out.
     
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  15. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm another one who dislikes being referred to as a 'diabetic' instead of 'a person with diabetes' IF the subject being discussed is diabetes of course. I think for me, it's because I seriously do not like labels that tend to define a person either by a health condition they have, or a group they may belong to, or by the way they look, etc. It can lead to bias and stereotyping and a person switching off to any information beyond that point, I'm sure we've all been subject of a diabetes Nurse/GP who focuses solely on the word 'DIABETIC' and takes no notice of anything else that may contribute. Of course I know that this sounds very deep and being referred to as 'diabetic' is hardly on a par with other labels BUT I do not like it and as others say, nobody refers to someone with a form of cancer as 'cancerous'.
     
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  16. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I am a diabetic.

    Just like I'm a sailor, a dog lover, an occasional pain in the backside, fat, and a friend.
    Those traits (and many more) are all part of who I am. I don't have time to refer to all those traits as being a person who can and likes to sail, a person who likes dogs, a person who can be very annoying, a person who carries more weight than is optimal, a person who knows some people and likes them and vice versa.

    I'm also fine with referring to you as a person with diabetes. If this feels better for you, why not?

    You'll find a 'delete' button right below your posts. Also an 'edit' button for if you want to change something.
     
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    #16 Antje77, Mar 10, 2021 at 1:13 PM
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2021
  17. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    I did object to being called an epileptic by an HCP, but being referred to as diabetic is fine.

    Edit: I don't have epilepsy which is why I objected. They had mixed up my notes with someone else's with the same first name as me. I objected because to call me an epileptic was inaccurate.
     
    #17 zand, Mar 10, 2021 at 1:16 PM
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2021
  18. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Wish that how I’m referred to was all I had to worry about to be honest
     
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  19. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    Most of my interactions about diabetes occur via the computer screen.

    a person with diabetes = 22 keystrokes
    Diabetic = 8 keystrokes
    Have diabetes = 13 keystrokes

    It is a pity if people get offended by my economies of effort, but the reality is that I’m not going to add a whole load of extra (unnecessary) typing, especially when it makes zero difference to the intention of my post, and any reader can easily mentally insert the extra keystrokes, if they wish.

    Regarding the labelling issue, I don’t see the problem. Labels (as @Antje77 so eloquently said above), labels are social shorthand (as well as typing shorthand). We all use labels multiple times a day, in multiple ways. Good grief, imagine if we didn’t? I for one would refuse to touch the keyboard if I had to type everything out in full, avoiding conventional social shortcuts like keto, prick testing, CGMs, macros, carb ratios, pens, Tories, Covid, jabs, zapping a sensor... etc. etc.
     
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  20. Sarah69

    Sarah69 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I find once you’ve told somebody your diabetic they look at you in a completely different way!
     
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