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I'm giving up..

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by novowolf, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. alice_10

    alice_10 · Newbie

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    Don't lose confidence!!
     
  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Glad to hear you got your fighting talk back, just stay positive, remember you are never alone and that it takes time to balance it out, but it can happen so believe that.

    Good luck :thumbup:
     
  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Novowolf,

    Well, diabetes is a bit of a ******* isn't it? Sometimes I wonder why I became a diabetic...

    The main issue with me is how relentless it is; it just never stops. But such is life.

    The things that help me are most certainly low-carbing, doing exercise (short sprint type exercise if nothing else), getting to grips with carb counting and dose adjustment (I use the Abbott FreeStyle Insulinx blood testing meter which will calculate your insulin doses once you've set it up - it's a great help), and lastly the understanding that diabetes is a changeable thing; my insulin sensitivity changes noticeably throughout the day (I'm very insensitive to insulin in the morning and much more sensitive from about 6:00 pm).

    Controlling blood sugar has many variables to it but it is not random so even when you get a high with bit of creativity you should be able to work out why it happened and then try and avoid that situation again. The more guess work you can get rid of the better.

    Keeping a blood sugar level between 4-6 is not going to happen; so don't worry about that. Do the best you can and then try and improve on that or at least don't go backwards.

    Best

    Dillinger
     
  4. logindetails

    logindetails Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm new here and this is my first post and honestly I'm not trying to teach my grandmother how to suck eggs.

    I'm 55 and was diagnosed with T1 in August. I'm on Lantus and Novorapid. My Lantus dose is 30 units and it stung like hell. My DN suggested I try a longer needle (I was using 4mm) so I tried 6mm (same gauge) and wonder of wonders no more stinging.

    Not sure why it worked for me - my theory is that as the insulin is being injected a little deeper it's not interfering with nerve endings nearer the surface of the skin.
     
  5. nmr1991

    nmr1991 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Blood glucose testing is so depressing and is so inconvenient, my intuition about what my levels are is far more accurate and convenient in my opinion. Saying that I can't remember the last time I tested my blood sugar, probably back in August.
     
  6. coistygirl

    coistygirl · Newbie

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    I know how you feel. I have been diabetic now for 0ver 31 years and still have days when no matter what I do my levels are really high. My diabetic team told me that sometime there are no reasons for bg being high. At onetime I felt really depressed and even though I knew that there were people much worse than me nothing or nobody could help me. As my levels came back down my moods began to improve and could start to look forward. I am now on DAFNE and see a big difference. I can now cope when bg are not right. I still have days when I feel sorry for myself and say "why me?" but |am now in control and not letting it control me. You are not alone
    :thumbup:
     
  7. Dodo

    Dodo Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Couldn't agree more with RachelBryson. I've been T1 now for 47 years and decided I control it, it doesn't control me. If my blood sugar levels go, then I get them back down. Don't give up, see your GP, I believe there are councillors now you can talk to if you get depressed. Hope you get over this stage soon.


    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App
     
  8. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Please test your blood sugar levels; if you are on a basal/bolus regime how on earth do you calculate correction doses? I'm afraid I can't believe for a moment that you can intuitively tell the difference between a 4.5 and an 8.5 especially as you are showing an HbA1c of 8.6% means you are running an average blood sugar of 11.1 mmol/l.

    Best

    Dillinger
     
  9. the_anticarb

    the_anticarb · Well-Known Member

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    Testing is the biggest pain in the backside with diabetes. I've just been through a pregnancy where I was testing in excess of 12 times per day towards the end, and going back to being a 'normal' diabetic is the hardest thing as it's soooo tempting to think now I've given birth I can afford to relax it a little. Trouble is a little becomes a lot.

    I let myself have last weekend off testing, I just needed a break, and I ended up overestimating my insulin and going hypo in the middle of the night. At least I didn't go massively high (I don't think!). It's not just the testing, it's having to have the meter, test sticks and insulin (for corrections) near me at all times, sometimes I can't be bothered to go and get my kit I just want to get on with whatever I'm doing, and it's a faff to have to go and get it, or remember to take it with me, or whatever.

    My trouble is because I ignored my diabetes for 15 years after diagnosis, this has lead to complications in my eyes which scare the living **** out of me, and this keeps me on the straight and narrow now.

    I do think it is harder psychologically to manage diabetes if you've not had any complications yet though.
     
  10. Rockape671

    Rockape671 · Well-Known Member

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    Aye, It sucks, but the good thing about it is that it's up to us to control it, as best we can. We don't have to rely on someone else to do it for us. I struggled to get it under control but found that exercise, carb counting,frequent testing and (probably most importantly) keeping a detailed record really helped. And accepting that no matter how hard you try, it'll always do whatever it wants to every now and then. But if you keep good records you can usually look back and figure out why. And if you can't this time, maybe next time.
     
  11. SamJB

    SamJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Spot on, as ever, Dillinger. Anti_carb, if I remember correctly, that you were a low carber and well controlled when I joined the forum last year. Sorry for bringing it up, but I always remember you speaking sense on here, so hope you can reign things back again.
     
  12. the_anticarb

    the_anticarb · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I am not losing control, but I am just finding it hard adjusting from being a pregnant diabetic, when there is so much at stake to motivate you but also an end in sight, to a 'normal' diabetic where there is no end in sight and the odd bad day (so long as it does not turn into weeks) is not the end of the world. In some ways it is easier psychologically to be a pregnant diabetic just because the motivation is so high (although physically it's more difficult due to the strict targets and insulin resistance)
    Oh how I envy the gestational diabetics who can go back to normal at the end!
    I was telling my step-mum about everything I need to do to control my diabetes, all the testing and carb counting, and she said 'that sounds like a right pain in the arse!'
    I think that quite succinctly sums the whole thing up!
    Ah well. I have accepted that I have a duty to myself and my family to take care of my health, whatever that entails, so it's just a case of getting on with it really.
     
  13. themorningtest

    themorningtest · Newbie

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    Hi there to all the DT1s struggling with tests and insulin shots! Since pretty much have been said already, I'll try to make this reply short. Hope you don't feel this like a rude way to answer, please don't get me wrong.

    First of all, you all have my support and understanding, as well as my empathy. I've been DT1 since 1991.

    Now we have that clear, I don't really get how can you feel the daily tests are a punishment that deserves you feeling depressed.
    Altogether it doesn't take more than a minute. Hell! The machine almost does it for you!
    And Insulin shots? THEY SHOULDN'T BE that PAINFUL!!! As said before, try different needles, new syringes! Find which brand is the best for you. See which part of your body doesn't hurt that much, you have plenty to choose from! Arms, Belly, Legs, etc...

    There was a time I was afraid because my arms started to have little bruises after so many shots, but they were gone when I started doing exercise. So...

    Today, 2013, there are a lot of things that'll make our lives much freakin' easier! See, back in the early 90's I had to take 3 minutes for each daily test, even I had to dry the blood from the strip myself (anybody here used the "Glucometer"?); and the needles were as big as a broomstick!! And now we might be very close to a cure? (In fact there are ways we might be able to cure ourselves, but there's no medical proof, I don't think it should be discussed here). Only thing I regret they didn't make yet is a clockwatch that can test your glucose levels.

    Hope you don't get bothered I try to be optimistic. Guess it becomes harder if you don't have someone to let know how you feel, but this forum seems like a really good start! I mean, I'd have given anything to have something like this when I started.

    Finally, never stop making the tests and don't even think to stop the shots if you need them. You don't really want to feel in your body what happens when you are about to get a shock by hyperglycemia, believe me...

    Keep it up!
     
  14. agold

    agold · Active Member

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    I totally know where you're coming from. I've been type 1 for about 17 years since I was 17. It's a constant uphill struggle. My advice would be to definitely pursue getting a pump! If your levels are unpredictable and you're doing everything you can in terms of regular testing, carb counting and adjustments, then a pump could help you. I would speak to your nurse/consultant about it. At the very least it means no more injecting and could help you to become more stable. If you get lots of hypos this would also be a reason to get one. See what your diabetes team says and don't be afraid to be a bit pushy about it! Tell them how you are feeling.

    Hope it gets better for you! You're not alone in that feeling of wanting to give up!
     
  15. apples-mum

    apples-mum · Member

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    Please don't give up. Im not diabetic but my 12 year old daughter is. I had to answer the godawful question of mortality tonight. Right now I want to punch the world. I don't believe you ever become immune to the pain of shots, or ever really get used to the inconvenience of EVERYTHING that this ******* disease throws. But please don't let it beat you
     
  16. neilblackwood

    neilblackwood · Member

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    There's a lot of type 1 diabetics that get infinitely better sugar control following a low carb/ketogenic diet, the question is whether it's something that works for you, I'm not diabetic, my partner is, but having educated myself on the benefits of going lower carb for the health of anyone regardless if they're diabetic or not, for the most part we're quite happy to eat meals with less than 15g of carb in them, but we love steak dripping in butter! I'm also inclined to think that better sugar control results in better overall well being, and eating this diet my partner's mood has improved.

    Whilst I'm not currently aware of a way to avoid injections altogether, going low carb/ketogenic will likely keep your injections limited to less than 5 a day (A dose of fast acting insulin for meals containing carbs and 1 basal dose).

    If you're interested to read more about the low carb diet, rather than repost what I posted earlier, you can take a look at my earlier post here:

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=47980#p432748

    Stick with it and things will get better.
     
  17. hotblack desiato

    hotblack desiato Type 2 · Active Member

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    re , im giving up , I am type 2 , just diagnosed , **** myself when I got told , I consider myself lucky that I don't as yet need to test or to inject , ( I do intend to start testing ) , however , you should not be left swinging in the wind , is there a support group near ? , I am fortunate to have a few close friends who are fellow sufferers and we share the same sport , ( we do field target together ) , all I can say to you mate is don't despair , there are good people on here who have offered great advice , if you are really that low , see your medical team , all the very best ,HBD .
     
  18. LordPercy

    LordPercy · Newbie

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    I'm giving up too. I've not had it for long but far far longer than I am prepared to cope with. Injecting, testing - not a problem. Being treated like an imbecile who suddenly doesn't know what's good for me or have the mental capacity to make my own decisions any more - hmmmm, that's what I'm not going to put up with any longer. I just do not accept that some f***wit doctor now has the right to dictate what I do with my life - when I exercise, when I sleep, when I drive, when and what I eat, etc, and there is just no way I can contemplate living the rest of my life to order ...for what? To tick the NHS's boxes? To make their figures look good? I've been round this every which way, and believe me I have considered all the possiblities. There is no option that allows me to go on because I think next time I have to justify myself to one of these self-serving egotistical idiots I shall be in danger of doing actual physical damage. I'm just so angry that the rest of my life is now going to be spent being, well, angry, and resentful. I have to answer to too many people and I just don't buy into the idea that my life is no longer my own, to do with what I choose. It's an utterly screwy situation when substances such as alcohol and cigarettes can be bought freely, and drugs and pills can be obtained if you know where to go; but I'm prevented from using my own resources to purchase the poison that I need to keep me alive. Unless the sale of insulin is legalised in the next few weeks (yeah right ...) I will be making other plans. I really don't need to hear other people's success stories. I don't need to be told to talk to a GP (they are the source of my rage in the f***ing first place!!), I don't need support groups, I don't need to be sniggered at and told "it can't possibly be that bad!", I don't need to know that other people are dealing with far worse (good for them - more power to them. It doesn't mean that I have to do the same). I just need the autonomy to live my own life without interference, and unfortunately that is no longer a possibility. I am living with the consequences of my own actions (bad choices: bad dietry choices, bloody stupid naive utterly short-sighted misguided decision to walk into hospital, instead of just go to sleep, which is what I wanted to do!!!) and now I have to deal with that and accept that my options are narrowing. Sorry that this is not the sort of support story that other people might want to read on a forum like this. Some of the stories above I identified with and I think they are justifed feelings. Sometimes not everything can be fixed and sometimes people need to accept that and come to terms with it. I am. I have.
     
  19. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Lordpercy
    Dont give up... Its a cruel disease but you are worth so much more than succumbing to it and these sad thoughts.

    Been there, you could be my twin!! Believe me...you are not alone with this type of thought, but it is possible to improve the way you deel.. Honest...
     
  20. Dillinger

    Dillinger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow - I hope you don't mean this; when were you diagnosed? You seem VERY angry to me which is fine, but it's not something that will last; you won't be feeling like this for ever. There are stages in grief and there are stages in coming to terms with diabetes; and it doesn't make you an automaton but you are in one of those stages.

    You sound like you are fed up with your medical help and that's understandable; but you can bypass that and learn yourself, read the Bernstein, Atkins, Taubes books and get an understanding of what your condition is about.

    Here is a rather beautiful letter from Stephen Fry to a woman who wrote to him; I hope it strikes a nerve with you.

    http://www.lettersofnote.com/2009/10/it ... e-day.html

    Best

    Dillinger
     
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