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Injections. Or pump?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by -beckyb93-, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. -beckyb93-

    -beckyb93- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone.
    My names Becky.

    I have been type 1 diabetes since December 2000.
    I've recently moved from North West to WestMidlands. I was admitted due to eratic bms due to viral infection. Whilst admitted I had 2 diabetes consultants come see me and tell me I should be on the pump and nt injections..

    What are people opinions. I personally don't know anyone on the pump only injection...

    Any advice...? Xx
     
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  2. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    How are your blood sugars @-beckyb93- ?

    I was on injections for 10 years, then went onto a pump and I love it :) No basal insulin suited my needs, but the pump is perfect. It also allows me to change my basal for exercise or illness, etc.
     
  3. -beckyb93-

    -beckyb93- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In so scared right now. I've got viral infection. I'm at uni 89 miles away from home. No gp. Struggling.
    Sugars very eratic. Correction doses not helping or working.im scared. Waiting for diabetes team at nearby hospital to ring back. As I was admitted over night on Friday due to erratic blood sugars x
     
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  4. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Don't panic @-beckyb93- The viral infection coukd very easily be causing your highs. Sometimes people with diabetes do need a bit of extra help at times like this. If your diabetes team say you should be admitted, don't be scared. In hospital they can control your sugars and make sure you're ok.

    A few things - first, register with a local GP when you're feeling better. Many Unis have a link with a local surgery. Even if they don't, they'll be able to give you advice about finding one.

    Second - are you counting carbs and adjusting your insulin to match? If not, ask the diabetes team for help with that. Carb counting is crucial for good control.

    If you're by yourself at the moment, keep your phone near you, test lots, keep hydrated, and don't be afraid to phone your diabetes team if they don't call you soon.
     
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  5. fletchweb

    fletchweb Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I've stayed away from the pump. I don't trust the technology - I believe that pumps malfunction more times than they should and I question the marketing strategy used by pump manufacturers. They're also expensive. My sister seriously considered using one but was concerned about the potential cancer risks of using a medical device that exposes its users to Teflon (common material in the manufacturing of this technology) . I don;t know if that's a valid concern or not but I prefer to know that if I'm injecting 6 units of humulog I'm actually getting those 6 units. I've had discussions with other people who use pumps that comment at times they are not sure. So ... I guess that's why I don't use a pump lol. Some people swear by them and have a lot of faith in how it can improve their control - I just haven;t met any of those people yet. :)
    As for viral infections and Blood Sugar Levels - that's fairly common. It happens to me and I find that I have to test myself every hour until I can stabilize my BGs within a normal range. It can be difficult figuring out the best approach - I've been type 1 for 50 years and I think I have it figured out but test yourself often when you're fighting a virus and adjust your insulin based on those readings. As well when I find myself in this situation I also fast. It makes it easier to regulate the BGs without going too low or high.
     
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    #5 fletchweb, Oct 17, 2016 at 1:07 PM
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
  6. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @fletchweb Each to their own :)

    There are stainless steel cannulas for those who prefer them. I use both steel and Teflon. I've used a pump for 12 years (two different models of pumps) and haven't had a technical problem - ever. The only highs I've had are due to poor absorption, but that's possible with injections too.

    Pumps perform numerous self-checks and have very robust checking systems :)

    I'm more happy with relying on my pump to deliver precise doses than I am on my insulin pen. The accuracy of pumps is amazing.
     
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  7. rockape37

    rockape37 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If your offered a pump, go for it it is the way forward.

    As for a GP i believe universities have a gp attached to them so please check this out. It should have been mentioned to you at the start of your course.

    Regards

    Martin
     
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  8. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Nothing like a bit of scaremongering there, good job.

    I've only known a pump malfunction once, when I broke it (dropped onto concrete).

    By being on this forum Your meeting a lot of people who have had pumps massively improve their control. I'm one, its good to meet you.

    @-beckyb93- dont worry youre in the right place. do you want some help? could you give us some more info like how often youre testing and if you have Keytones?
     
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  9. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    I was on injections for 33 years before moving to a pump, now 20 months post-pump I can honestly say it's one of the best decisions I've ever made.
     
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  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @~beckyb93~, similarly to @noblehead, I'd been on injections for 26 years and moved onto a pump a year ago. it was a bit of a kick for me as I've since gone on and built my own artificial pancreas system, which is quite cool! Whilst @fletchweb might have his concerns about using a pump, those of us on here who are successfully using them and have had thousands of hours of use without random blood glucoses that would be indicative of pump malfunction would all recommend that you look into it.
     
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  11. -beckyb93-

    -beckyb93- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No ketone. Discharged from hospital saturday.
    I'm usually hypo and hyper aware but since this viral infection I'm unable to.
    Wednesday Thursday I woke up.for toilet at 5am. My sugars were 21.3 and 23.1
    Friday I woke up and they were 3.3
    I had done exactly the same insulin regime and food as I wasn't fancying too many different foods.
    Usually chicken haha.

    Usually I'm never this bad with sugats when I'm.ill. bit this time it's just horrendous
    And is up down up down. And now constantly up x
     
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  12. jasmine1616

    jasmine1616 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a pump, and I am going to tell you now... It's life changing. As long as you are good at controlling your blood sugar right now, then you should get a pump. It makes it even easier to control your blood sugar and you don't have to poke yourself as much. I recommend getting a t:slim insulin pump. Just letting you know. : )
     
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  13. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    I agree with the other pump users Beccy, it will improve your control greatly as long as you're prepared to put in the initial groundwork on adjusting your settings.

    I haven't had any malfunctions on mine, it's efficient and I couldn't live without it now, I use steel infusion sets, change them every 2 days, and absorption is faultless providing it's inserted correctly.

    Worst case scenario is you try it for a few months and see how you feel then, you can always hand it back but getting access to one for most people is very hard so I would go for it, good luck and hope you feel better soon ;)
     
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  14. fletchweb

    fletchweb Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    In regard to fear mongering - if one holds a dissenting view that's fear mongering? - that certainly wasn't my intention -I feel it's important to have all "opinions" expressed.

    My apologies .....
     
  15. Type1Bri

    Type1Bri Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  16. Type1Lad

    Type1Lad Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Pumps are amazing, it is a lot of work but really worth it. I have managed to gain back better management in my diabetes then I ever had on MDI. If you have any questions feel free to ask away =)
     
  17. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I love my pump @-beckyb93- I got it a year ago on Wednesday (happy pump birthday to me!) after 29.5 years of injecting.

    I LOVE IT.

    Seriously love it.

    :)
     
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  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I've had 3 pumps and been through a rollercoaster of getting on superbly ad then faults.. However the faults may just be my skin rejecting cannulas in me on a constant basis. I
    Am
    Intolerant to a lot of drugs
    etc, but as far as I know I am a rare bird!! No one else seems to get problems which all of a sudden started after 4 great years with a pump.. Yes they were great.

    If I was to advise a youngster, it would be to get a pump if you can.

    They can free up your life and doing things and still getting brilliant control.
    Ie if you had a fever you
    would be able to turn on a temporary increased basal rate for as long as you felt necessary.

    I like MDI for being more hidden though. I'm not one for showing off a pump and detaching it to do things etc.. I loved my pump that had a fully functional remote control. Control for me on MDI is not so good with dawn or waking phenomenon... I'm on jabs now and have to wake at 4am everyday to give a buls to stop Dawn phenomenen.. I miss my sleep.

    My advice, and believe me, I've been on a huge roller coaster of health events in past 18months...a pump is recommended by me for you to consider.
     
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  19. redtree92

    redtree92 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    I have been type one for 11 years now, and am on my way to getting an insulin pump, I have done allot of research into it over a few years, I went hot and cold on the idea so many times, but I am now 24 and i know its whats best for my control, I guess everyone is different, but I really struggle to keep my levels as low as they should be, and the pump will change my life, Diabetes will no longer control me!

    but definitely watch some videos, of real people using the pump and see what you feel! The nurses and doctors can advise you, but you are the one having to live with it !

    Good luck with whatever you choose to do :)

    xxx
     
  20. -beckyb93-

    -beckyb93- Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. I've got diabetes appointment on Tuesday (25th) so hopefully will know more.
    I'm a little scared about the pump as it's a whole new regime and stuff.
    But I'm also really excited.
    Will see what's said on Tuesday. I've been diabetic for 16 years and feel hopeless at times with my diabetes.
    I'm really hoping they'll start it soon as and I can start feeling a bit better and abit normal.
    I say normal. But I suffer with depression which is secondary to the diabetes. Diabetes was a big influence that triggered my depression

    Thanks everyone x
     
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