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Libre NHS criteria

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Fatima_94, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. 22nw22

    22nw22 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank goodness it is not on the NHS where I am then
     
  2. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There is the small issue that the libre is not approved by DVLA (due to lots of errors at low BG) and hence the NHS can't tell people not to use their current meter if they are given a libre. So assuming that someone commutes by car, at least two sticks are needed each day.
     
  3. daemoncor

    daemoncor Type 1 · Member

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    Did you manage to get some?
     
  4. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    You can use blood sticks in the Libre scanner though, it triples up as a blood and ketone meter.
     
  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But that still leaves the NHS paying for the sticks.... (the NHS gets the meters for free.) Hence the libre can't be justified based on saving the cost of sticks, remember that the poeple who are most likely to qualify for the libre tend to use the least sticks.
     
  6. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm definitely cost neutral at the moment using the Libre, but I was finger pricking around 10 x a day, as far as it goes the RMOC T1 criteria classes >8x as cost neutral in their recommendations.
     
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  7. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Another issue with the libre is the risk of it taking up more doctor time. Hence I am of the view that the best way for the NHS to justify the cost is to combine the libre with selfmanagemnt training..... The training should be able to be done without needing any time from doctors.

    As much as we all know that a better A1c saves the NHS money in 10 years time, most NHS mangment would be very happy at present if they thought the NHS could keep going for the next 30 days......
     
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  8. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As an NHS patient I'm pleased to see my hba1c drop from my clinic score of 52 to a libre indication of 6.9mmols/l which I can convert to 42, in 10 days.

    And I've saved using around 79 test strips.

    Edit and 2 units fast acting & a unit of basal less a day :p
     
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  9. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Abbot provide 50 sticks a month to people using it on long term prescription.

    I’m using less than half the insulin I was, so there's a saving there too. And my feet might not fall off, so I imagine I’m saving the NHS money on the complications front. Obviously n=1 but I’ve just avoided complicated surgery on my jaw to treat tirigeminal neuralgia which has almost disappeared since I normalised my blood sugars thanks to the Libre..
     
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  10. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Nope, went to Asda again last night. Pharmacist said that the store manager has not set up an account with Abbott and will most likely not do so until he has to. Although they know that the CCG are funding it for at least some patients, they haven't actually handled any prescriptions yet at the pharmacy.

    Pharmacist also does some hours at Lloyds so she suggested I give them a try. Will ask when I pick my next lot of med's at the weekend.
     
  11. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  12. Q4444

    Q4444 Type 1 · Active Member

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    It seems as if the only people who qualify in my local CCG are those who are in and out of hospital with hypo. I wanted to get it but because I do not test 6 to 8 times a day. I want to be able to use my hands. "We are following South Yorkshire CCG" I was told , that CCG does not exist. I have had type 1 for 56 + years they may as well have been no announce ment as it is not available to anyone. We have been misled. On the subject of self funding will the tax people refund the cost?
     
  13. 22nw22

    22nw22 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I just hope I am not given because it will be a hard transition especially with blood testing being my norm.
     
  14. Copernicus

    Copernicus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My local Asda keep them in stock all the time. Lloyds (mainly found in Sainsbury stores) will not get them in without a prescription first. they will not stock them for over the counter purchase.
     
  15. Copernicus

    Copernicus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    An update re Boots. I bought a sensor from my small local Boots pharmacy for £35 but was informed that they would no longer be able to supply me as it was "company policy" Today I went to a large Boots pharmacy to see if they would supply them and was told they would. When I asked a price they quoted me £53, more if they added the VAT. When I pointed out that I had bought one for £35 from a smaller branch and that I could get them for £35 from Superdrug and £44 from Asda, I was told that head office had realised that by selling them for £35 they were not making any profit hence the price rise. So thanks for that Boots, another example of a British institution screwing you over. I have already written a letter of complaint to the managing director.
     
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  16. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, what do people do about faulty sensors when they've bought from a chemist? Do they still contact Abbott or go back to the chemist? If the latter then I can see why the chemists might decide they need a hefty profit margin to make the trouble of stocking them worthwhile....
     
  17. barrym

    barrym LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I've had to return 3 sensors since November and I did by calling the Abbott help desk.
     
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  18. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The chemist also get a replacement from Abbott free of charge, so no excuse for pumping up the price there.
    And they even often have them on 'consignment'. Meaning they only pay Abbott for when they actually have sold them, and no outlay as long as they are just on stock.
     
  19. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know really what is going on here, if you on the UK market have some second- or 3rd grade stuff really or some in the supply chain are mis-treating them on purpose???
    I get mine either by public mail direct from Abbott (when in South France) or from local hospital (when in Belgium)
    Since I started using Libre back in January 2015 and never stopped since, I have experienced 1 (ONE !) sensor that malfunctioned. I have experienced 3 that got ripped off my arm, but all due to my own physical activities and cannot blame at all neither the glue-pad or the sensor at all for those episodes. And after I have become more conscious about its presence and dressing better up for some river rafting and surfing etc, I have not had one getting torn off the last few years.
     
  20. Brit90

    Brit90 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    This is the letter I got from complaining to my NHS - about the lack of Freestyle... West Suffolk

    Thank you for your email.

    FreeStyle Libre® and other Flash Glucose Monitoring Systems (FGMS) are not currently supported on NHS prescription in the NHS Ipswich & East Suffolk, NHS West Suffolk and NHS North East Essex clinical commissioning group areas.

    FreeStyle Libre®, the first FGMS, monitors glucose levels using interstitial fluid levels rather than capillary blood glucose from finger prick testing.

    Prescribing will not be supported until a full review of the product has been carried out and its place in local glucose monitoring pathways agreed. This review will consider both local and national guidance relating to the device, outcome evidence and cost effectiveness.

    The CCGs’ position is based on a review of FreeStyle Libre® undertaken by the East of England Priorities Advisory Committee, which is currently discussing the use of these devices with endocrinologists to inform local recommendations regarding their use.

    All three CCGs fully support the management of diabetes through engagement with accredited educational programmes such as Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) and Diabetes Education and Self-Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND).

    DAFNE and DESMOND educational programmes are freely available for all diabetic patients in Suffolk and their availability has recently been enhanced.

    Yours sincerely

    Dr Mark Shenton

    Chair
    Ipswich & East Suffolk CCG
     
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