1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Low-carb diets should be reinstated as pillars of diabetes control, suggests new study

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    Likes Received:
    694
    Trophy Points:
    133
    A new literature review suggests that current dietary guidelines on how to handle diabetes are not optimal and should be revised. In a recent editorial, published in the online journal Diet, Nutrition and Mental Health and Wellbeing, two members of the not for profit organisation Nutrition Society have assessed the strength of evidence in favour of low-carb diets for diabetes management.

    The authors collected data from seven randomised control trials and intervention studies conducted between 2001 and 2015.

    All of them appeared in peer-reviewed journals and tested low-carb against high-carb, low-fat diets for managing diabetes. Dr Sarah Illingworth and M.R. McKenzie, who are both affiliated to the London Metropolitan University, have looked at the impact of a low-carb diet on HbA1c levels, weight, changes in lipoproteins, blood sugar variability and adjustments in medication.

    What they've found is that the lower the carb intake, the more significant are the reductions in HbA1c, with up to a 2.2 per cent reduction when daily carbohydrate intake is capped at 30 g. Perhaps more interestingly is how little carbohydrate reduction (under 120g per day) is needed to have at least some impact (-0.9%) on HbA1c.

    In terms of lowering bodyweight, a low-carb diet resulted in almost twice the weight loss (4.7 kg) seen with a low-fat diet (2.9) after two years. Fasting blood sugars dropped like a rock (from 11.7 mmol/mol to 7.0 mmol/mol) very early on for many participants in response to low-carb diets.

    Over half of those who consumed only 14 per cent of their total energy requirements as carbohydrate, compared to 53 per cent as per current dietary recommendations, could also safely reduce their medication. In many cases, the reduction in medication also correlated with less instances of hypoglycemia, a two-fold greater decrease in blood sugar variability and more time spent in target or normal range.

    A low-carb diet (58% fat, 14% carbs) also appeared superior to low-fat (30% fat, 53% carbs) in preventing heart disease. Results showed the former reduces triglyceride levels and increases high density lipoprotein (HDL). Low-carb was also the winner in terms of treatment satisfaction and stress management, with people reporting less negative emotions during the day. To sum up, low-fat diets at the centre of official guidelines are not optimal for diabetes management.

    They do not help people keep their blood sugars, weight and other very important health metrics under control as much as low-carb diets do. Illingworth and McKenzie ended their review by rooting for a carbohydrate-restricted diet to have a place within the guidelines. For more information about eating a low-carb diet, check out our Low Carb Program.

    Continue reading...
     
    • Like Like x 21
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,929
    Likes Received:
    11,572
    Trophy Points:
    298
    This needs boosting up and shouting out about...
    Can we send it to all new joiners please?
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
    • Like Like x 4
    • Winner Winner x 2
  3. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Likes Received:
    5,109
    Trophy Points:
    178
    and about time to
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
  4. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,316
    Likes Received:
    1,299
    Trophy Points:
    178
    About time is right!
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  5. mo53

    mo53 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,390
    Likes Received:
    28,305
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Brilliant article.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,596
    Likes Received:
    3,259
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Bump. @Administrator can we make this a 'sticky'? in the beginners section?
     
    • Agree Agree x 8
    • Like Like x 3
  7. Administrator

    Administrator Family member · Well-Known Member
    Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,489
    Likes Received:
    963
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Yeah, sure! Maybe we can edit it slightly so it's easier to read!
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  8. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,596
    Likes Received:
    3,259
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Don't forget to add the usual DCUK invitation to join the Low Carb diet course, that normally gets embedded into the news stories on this site. This time it is appropriate, so I will not whinge like I have done in the past,

    Edit: @Administrator I make this dig because if a news item gets altered before being posted here, then it gives the readers here a false impression that LC is being discussed in the wider world, I would be happier if it was added as an obvious invite as perhaps a footnote to a news item rather than disguising it within the body of text. I support an LC diet for myself, so I agree that we need to spread the word. I like the posts I get on FB and try to share them without appearing to be over zealous.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #8 Oldvatr, Feb 16, 2017 at 12:45 PM
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017
  9. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,839
    Likes Received:
    1,767
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Why does the title of the thread say "reinstated" - was low carb originally recommended as a treatment?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,929
    Likes Received:
    11,572
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Yes in 1863 William Banting wrote a pamphlet on obesity and Type 2 and treating it with LCHF. Also pre the discovery of insulin it was the only way that Type 1 diabetics could live.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Banting

    Amazingly insulin was discovered by someone else called Banting too

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes/discoveryofinsulin.php
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 3
    • Informative Informative x 2
  11. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,839
    Likes Received:
    1,767
    Trophy Points:
    178
    That's amazing, thanks @bulkbiker. I have also learned from google that the Swedish verb banta means to slim or diet.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

    Messages:
    25,024
    Likes Received:
    30,523
    Trophy Points:
    298

    Cookery and Household Management
    Printed 1936

    Diabetes

    Those suffering from this ailment require carefully to avoid all foods containing sugar and starch. The following Must be avoided:

    Milk, sugar, flour, cornflour, oatmeal, rice, sago, macaroni, the various pulse foods, fruits containing a high percentage of sugar, potatoes, beets, carrots, peas, parsnips, broad beans, spanish onions.

    The following are allowed:

    meat, soups, fish, poultry, game and meat of all kinds. Also eggs, butter, cream, cheese, certain vegetables. Light dry wines. Weak unsweetened spirits. Tea, coffee and cocoa which may be sweetened with saccharine. There may be plentiful use of butter, cream, fat and oils if the digestion will allow.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Useful Useful x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    137
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Low carb has gone in and out of 'fashion' a few times - oddly even before insulin was available as a treatment. The main 'alternative' diet proposed then was low calorie rather than low fat.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,596
    Likes Received:
    3,259
    Trophy Points:
    198
    LOW Carb diets tend to fail simply because without the HF part, there is not much to hit the saiety switch, and so users suffer hunger pangs and carb cravings. Also the HF appears to assist weight loss by supporting keto which burns fat. So LCLF diet on the other hand only reduces glucogen and retained water, so plateau's out soon.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #14 Oldvatr, Feb 16, 2017 at 4:40 PM
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017
  15. covknit

    covknit Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    357
    Trophy Points:
    103
    In Pears Cyclopedia 1965-1966 (one of those general household knowledge who, what, gardening atlas books which were the precursor of wikipedia) it says:-

    Although we know so much about diabetes, we still have not the faintest notion as to what causes it. Its immediate cause is a failure in varying degrees of the pancreas to produce insulin but examination of the pancreas rarely reveals any significant changes. The disease is commonest between thirty and sixty years, but may occur even in children. Now, insulin is the substance which makes it possible for the body to make use of sugar- the glucose which is the end-product of the carbohydrate digestion. So in its absence the glucose, although there to be used, is useless to the body and accumulates in the blood, finally passing out in the urine. (The fundamental test for diabetes is the discovery of sugar in the urine by the use of certain simple procedures.) The diabetic, then, is being starved of sugar no matter how much he takes in, and the excess sugar in the blood cannot be used acts as a poison, which, in extreme cases, sends the patient into coma and may- indeed, in former times usually did-result in death. The symptoms of diabetes vary, of course, with ts severity, but in the main they are: increasing appetite on the part of the body to supply the sugar which is there but so tantalisingly unavailable, great thirst, because this useless sugar has to be excreted and the production of urine demands water, frequently in passing urine and increasing loss of weight in spite of all that is taken in. In severe and untreated cases boils, itching of the skin, gangrene of the limbs, and finally coma and death may occur.

    Although mild cases of diabetes, and still can, be treated by dieting alone, by reducing the intake of carbohydrate, the diagnosis of diabetes prior to 1922 amounted almost to a death warrant. In that year, however the Canadian physicians Banting and Best separated out the secretion of the islets of langerhans and named it “insulin” ; they showed that insulin taken from the pancreas of animals and injected into the diabetic patient was just as effective of the home made article.

    Since a diabetic regime has to be decided on by the doctor according to the severity of the disease, no useful purpose would be served by discussing the details of diet or dosage of insulin which vary from one person to another. On the whole, diabetes is more severe in young people than in the elderly but with correct treatment it is possible for all cases to lead to a perfectly normal life except insofar as dietary restrictions and insulins injections are concerned. Many famous people are or have been diabetics - for example, H G Wells - and have lived to a ripe old age. Recently, a drug has been discovered which has the great benefit that unlike insulin, it can be taken by mouth.

    Whereas the type of diabetes we have been describing, the disease ordinarily known by that name is properly known as diabetes mellitus, there is another disease known as diabetes insipidus, which, in fact has no real relation to the other at all. In this disease there is no sugar in the urine nor has it anything to do with the pancreas. Diabetes insipidus characterised by the passage of large amounts of dilute urine and appears to be due to deficiency of the secretion of the posterior part of the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. It can be particularly controlled by the use of pituitrin.

    So as recently has the 1960's expert advise was -avoid carbs
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Informative Informative x 3
  16. LAR

    LAR Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    845
    Trophy Points:
    113
    • Like Like x 3
  17. juliegeorge13

    juliegeorge13 · Member

    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Brilliant article. Thank you. Jx
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. brel

    brel Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    43
    nice article, but most of it went over my head, as I aint got a clue what to do with regards to diet, as there is too much conflicting advice on what diet to follow
     
  19. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,929
    Likes Received:
    11,572
    Trophy Points:
    298
    • Like Like x 1
  20. kittypoker

    kittypoker Friend · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    197
    Trophy Points:
    83
    If you check out https://www.dietdoctor.com/ it might be a bit clearer. I know it's hard to get your head around - I failed on the high carb, low fat diet for well over 40 years - but, promise, cutting way down on carbs and upping fats is sustainable for weight loss, control of blood glucose levels and even some forms of epilepsy. It's the way forward.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook