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Made bone broth - now what?

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by MrsA2, Nov 22, 2020.

  1. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So I made bone broth in the slow cooker and now have jelly which I have cut into lumps of varying sizes and frozen.
    But how do I actually use the stuff?
    I tried it in hot drink with some added water but still had to add Worcestershire sauce and quite a bit of seasoning. I could still only manage half a small mug.

    Ideas, amounts and advice please
     
  2. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the bones.
    I've tried beef stock a number of times and have always thought the time and effort, which is considerable, is not rewarded. The results being generally thin and disappointing.
    We have a roast chicken most Sunday's and I make a stock of the bones having peeled off the remaining meat. Everything goes into this, onion, carrot, celery, bay leaves, pepper corns and some garlic. Currently I use the srock for lunch on Tuesday to Friday. Small bowl and add either small amounts of the left over meat or add a few german meatballs, Lidls. It is much more like the thing.
    I want to try fish stock but don't have ready access to bones...
     
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  3. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    I use it as stock when cooking in the slow cooker/Instant Pot. Haven’t tried drinking it, but I do enjoy drinking the juices that are left after cooking/eating a joint.
     
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  4. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    I season it up with salt, pepper and if in the mood a bit of hot sauce.
    If I need a light lunch I crack a couple of eggs in it.
     
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  5. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Obviously, you could make a soup with it, but otherwise, I tend to view it as I would a (shop bought) stock pot or cube. I tend to utilise the electric pressure cooker to speed the process up a bit.

    I have made bone broth and enjoyed it, but it isn't a regular feature in our lives at the moment.
     
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  6. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest throwing it away and buying a jar of Bovril.
     
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  7. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    it is lamb bone broth.

    So is bone broth really just the stock I'd normally make from a roast, but cooked for much much longer?

    I thought bone broth was supposed to have special qualities and/or nutrients and it was to be drunk regularly...?
     
  8. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    It is very good for us, but then, so is a soup, or a sauce made from a good, intense stock.

    Personally, lamb broth/stock is the only variant I don't care for personally, but that's merely personal preference. My favourite is chicken, but maybe I'm a wuuuus.
     
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  9. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I would agree with @DCUKMod about lamb stock being not quite so popular, can be a bit strong.... and I love lamb mutton, esp kidney and liver.
     
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  10. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    I drink it rarely and if I do it’s beef broth. But my first rule of going keto, was if I don’t like it,I won’t eat it.
    I spent too many years eating things I was told where healthy and it did me no favours.
     
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    #10 Hotpepper20000, Nov 22, 2020 at 9:12 PM
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020
  11. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No. It's supposed to be made from boiling bones. Personally I buy a concentrate in gloopy liquid form, made from grass-fed beef bones. It's expensive but so is boiling bones for 48 hours :shifty:
     
  12. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    Or considerable shorter if using a pressure cooker.

    When I make it, I tend to use the electric pressure cooker, and switch it on as I go to bed, then it's done by morning.
     
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  13. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I use chicken bones and simmer them to death. Nothing gets wasted - I get the liquid/jelly for stock, a soup base, or sometimes just a mug full with a dollop of soured cream or coconut oil, and my two dogs get the mushed up bones and any little scraps of meat added to their dinners, and -big treat - lick the pan & utensils clean for me when we're done. Much to their dismay it takes me a while to get enough bones saved in the freezer to make it worth doing.
     
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  14. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    These bones were £1.17 from Morrisons and in the slow cooker for 30 hours...not an expensive experiment. In fact per hour it was very cheap.
    My cats like it!
     
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  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    You just reminded me of my dog - a big black Labrador.
    When I was making stock from bits and bones he would come and sit in front of the cooker and inhale deeply - trying to suck the pot off the stove I think.
    Dogs should not be given boiled or roasted bones as they can become brittle - one poor dog died after swallowing a sharp spike of bone. Brought to the RSPCA and opened up, but the bowel had been perforated and it was too late. I used to cook some porridge oats in the stock and my dog loved it.
     
  16. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    @Resurgam: I'm ultra careful regarding the little chicken bones from my stock - they used to get chucked away until I discovered cooking a bit longer made them really soft. Now I can crumble them with my fingers into a mushy powder, and anything I can't break down completely gets discarded so there's absolutely no sharp bits remaining that could harm my furry boys.
     
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  17. OrsonKartt

    OrsonKartt Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ideas, amounts and advice please[/QUOTE]

    It’s a stew time of the year imho. - i make a decent chicken stew by putting a whole chicken ( the best quality I can get) in a slow cooker. After 5/6 hours removing the bones - which local wildlife take - and adding celery tomatoes onion garlic and spicy sausage and lots of mushrooms . Very little prep time - very little washing up lots of warm lovely grub for cold and damp days
     
  18. OrsonKartt

    OrsonKartt Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I get grass fed beef bones for free at local farmers market . - worth asking if you have one nearby
     
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