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Massive increase in blood sugar after breakfast

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by PEG 2, Mar 31, 2018.

  1. PEG 2

    PEG 2 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi,
    I was diagnosed last week with type 2 and immediately put on to Metformin starting with a low dose gradually rising over several weeks.
    My diet has always been pretty good but I have cut out as many carbs and sugars as I can.
    This morning my blood glucose (BG) was 6.9 before breakfast, which was a bowl of porridge made from rolled oats which is what I normally have .I also had a kiwi fruit. After one hour my BG had shot up to ovro 14 mmol/l and I felt awfel .
    I normally have porridge and I have read kiwi is good for diabetics.
    Can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong here, or what on earth is going on. I am having a lot of trouble understanding the fluctuations, I know it is early days but any help would be welcome.
     
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  2. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hi @PEG 2 and welcome.

    I’m tagging @daisy1 for a welcome pack with lots of useful information for newbies, including diet.

    Both porridge and kiwi fruit would cause my blood sugars to rise steeply, so those may well be the source of your problem,
     
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  3. rab5

    rab5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  4. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Absolutely - how carbs and more carbs can be good for people who can't cope with carbs is a bit beyond me.
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
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    @PEG 2

    Hello PEG 2 and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  6. LouWilk059

    LouWilk059 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You say "...I have cut out as many carbs and sugars as I can" yet you indicate that "I normally have porridge and I have read kiwi is good for diabetics". A cup of oats plus one kiwi is at least 57 grams of carbs. That amount is more than some of us have in a day. That breakfast would create a huge spike for most of us and we too would feel awful.

    The following link may help you understand the role of carbohydrates in your diet.

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/Diabetes-and-Carbohydrate-diets.html
     
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  7. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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  8. Ragmar

    Ragmar Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Before diagnosis, porridge was one of the staples in my diet because of how it soaks up cholesterol but now I'm without.

    I've been eating bacon and eggs for the past few weeks, start my day off with lots of protein for the gym and fat to keep me full.
     
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  9. acs1951

    acs1951 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I think bacon, eggs, sausages, mushrooms etc might be a better start to the day. And ditch the Kiwi too and try Raspberries and Strawberries.
     
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  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I was eating carbs for almost two years to reduce cholesterol - it just went up, but the doctor was convinced I was not taking the diet seriously, doing it wrong, not telling the truth about what I ate etc. I went onto LCHF and my cholesterol took a nosedive and went on down. The nurse said it was a delayed reaction. Yeah - right. That sounds likely......
     
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  11. PEG 2

    PEG 2 Type 2 · Newbie

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    many thanks for all your help. There is so much conflicting advice out there for newbies like me, much of what I had read, including advice from my Doctor, was that porridge was a "good carb" and so should be ok. Thanks Rachox for the recipe, I will give it a try.
     
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  12. rab5

    rab5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    i think its obvious from your blood meter results that porridge is not good for you!
     
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  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    When you can't cope with carbs there are no good carbs - but fortunately there are no essential carbs.
    If you chose your carb containing foods to be the ones with lots of flavour and vitamins and minerals then - whatever amount you can cope with you will be getting the most nutrition from those carbs and you'll probably feel rather better for them. You might find that you are more sensitive to carbs in the mornings or the evenings - people vary but your meter will tell you how you are reacting, so you can make adjustments.
     
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  14. lowedb

    lowedb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Very early after diagnosis, I went to breakfast cereals with no added sugar. The only ones I found were shredded wheat or mini wheats. From what I had been told they should have been good for me. But I had five (yes count five) mini wheats with a tablespoon of milk, and my blood sugar rocketed. At that point I wondered how I could survive because I was still hungry the moment I finished breakfast. But now I avoid carbs. I rarely feel hungry, my BG is much lower, and I'm much better. Some people can get away with 'resistant' carbohydrates, but in my experience just avoid them altogether.
     
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  15. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Because you are testing after your meal you know better than your HCP what you can no longer tolerate, and unfortunately that is porridge with a strong probability that kiwi fruit is not helping. When I started out I tested each meal twice, there are so many variables, but with double figures after porridge it probably means that you will be joining a large group of us who can no longer tolerate grains in 'normal' portions. That means grain flour in all its various guises is out unless it is a special treat, and tropical fruit are also out. Do not despair though it means you can eat cream, cheese, eggs, bacon in full fat forms, and I find a home made yoghurt with a few berries makes a breakfast that keeps me going through the morning, others on here swear by 'bullet proof' coffee, made with cream or butter. Keep testing and you will find what works for you, we are all different. If you have time try keeping a food diary, it shows really clearly your progress and what you can and can no longer eat. One size does not fit all. Whether you need to lose weight or not it can help to keep a note of your body measurements on a weekly basis so that you are monitoring that as well.
    What is most important is your attitude. View it as an opportunity to find out more about your body so that you are more aware of what is going on. Then enjoy the adventure. :)
     
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  16. Glitter 2

    Glitter 2 Type 2 · Member

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    I am newly diagnosed type 2 straight onto Metformin, HbA1c of 67 had gestational with both pregnancies and had insulin.
    I know that any carbs send my BG up and Im feeling really angry and upset about that as I do not enjoy low carb eating and have been given no choice at the age of 44. I am a little overweight but certainly not obese. Personally I am not dealing well with the fact that I cannot have porridge or toast for breakfast. I also have high blood pressure and cholesterol and take medication, this is all inherited and I am angry about that too. Anyone else or is it just me?
     
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  17. rab5

    rab5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Knowing what is wrong and having the tools to deal with it are always a good start. I went through the same feelings for a while but managed quickly to get my head round it. I hope this happens for you sooner rather than later. Your condition can be reversed of that I am confident. Plenty of peeps on here have managed it. As far as toast and porridge goes I love eggs and bacon better lol . Fried in butter.....

    Good luck with your adventure. The low carb high fat way of living has worked for me big time. Im sure it will work for you!
     
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  18. Glitter 2

    Glitter 2 Type 2 · Member

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    @rab5 whilst I agree eggs and bacon fried in butter sounds delicious, how can that be an option for some one like me who also has high cholesterol for which I am taking medication?? I have done low carb diets in the past for weight loss and after a couple of weeks the thought of eating fat or vegetables again just made me feel sick. Kudos to all of you that can do low carb but for me I can’t do that for the rest of my life ☹️
     
  19. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Perhaps you need to do a search for the hundreds of threads about cholesterol and how it is made in the body. Food has very little to do with it. Most of it is made by the liver independently from anything we eat. There are loads of videos and links about it.

    How high is your cholesterol (including HDL/LDL/Triglycerides) ?
     
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  20. rab5

    rab5 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would not worry about your cholesterol... it may not be the issue you think it is

    Go to this site www.dietdoctor.com

    excellent site explains nearly everything I needed to know.

    You have a decision to make I suppose and I hope this doesnt come over unfair. The choice for me was simple... chronic disease manage it by doin nothing going along with what the DN wanted.... go blind..lose my feet etc etc . Keep asking questions read as much as you can, the information is out there. Then decide what you are willing to do or change. I wish you all the best in this. Plenty of people here are very kind and willing to help.
     
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