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Metformin the Devils Brew

Discussion in 'Metformin/Biguanides' started by dave fergy, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. dave fergy

    dave fergy · Newbie

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    e Hi folks Just joined the forum. Been on Metformin for four weeks having recently been diagnosed with Type 2. Metformin is the only drug I have taken in recent years preferring natural health alternatives. I suppose the shock of being diagnosed led me to take the Docs advice and take this devils brew. Starting off on his advice with 500mg and then after a week increasing to 1000mg therafter. What a terrible drug this is, I have never felt so unwell in my life. Farting like me grandad I was having to leave the room on several occasions so as not to pollute the environment of others. The second side effect (love that phrase, strike the word "side") was an overall body ache in combination with lethargy. On investigation I discovered I was not alone. It appears this drug is on the black list (i.e it has killed people). I have been off the drug for two days and already feel a zillion percent better. I will not be using this drug again. Hopefully this forum can provide me with with other (Non drug related) remedies which will help stabilise and perhaps eradicate this disease. best wishes Fergy
     
    #1 dave fergy, Apr 13, 2019 at 12:00 AM
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Could you tell us where you saw evidence of fatality and of 'black listing', please.
     
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  3. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't agree with everyone (though I believe there's a slow release version which is kinder to the stomach) but my understanding is that it's a well understood drug which has been around for a long while and is used by many people, not just diabetics (PCOS sufferers in particular).
     
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  4. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, if you don't want to take drugs then your best bet is to go low carb. Many of the T2 members of this forum have been able to go drug free by reducing their carbohydrate intake drastically. I'll tag in @daisy1 for the welcome info pack on diabetes. Good luck.

    ps If you're not going to take drugs recommended by your doctor (and maybe if you are) can I strongly recommend that you invest in a blood testing meter so that you can tell what your blood sugars are doing. At early stages this disease can be fairly silent, but the long and short term damage done to your organs by high blood sugars should not be ignored. There are other medications you can take if diet and/or metformin does not work for you, though I would strongly recommend you give low carb a try first.
     
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  5. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @dave fergy
    Hello Dave and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it interesting and helpful.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  7. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Hi @dave fergy
    Metformin is one of the best researched and longest used medicines in the doctor’s arsenal, for treating type 2 diabetes.

    While there are most definitely side effects reported for many users (including gut, muscle, memory and others) it is still one of the best tolerated drugs for the majority of patients.

    Could you please provide links to the information you are referring to, so that members can make up their own minds about the risks?
     
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  8. Rachox

    Rachox Other · Type 2 - well controlled. Moderator.
    Staff Member

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    I’m on Metformin and have been for nearly two years, I tolerate it well, no side effects. It only makes a tiny difference to my blood sugars but has other health benefits as cited here:
    https://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2001/9/report_metformin/Page-01
    There is a risk of serious illness or even death from hypos or lactic acidosis, if Metformin is taken with alcohol, as I don’t drink it’s not a risk I have to be concerned about, here’s some info about that:
    https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/metformin-alcohol

    Edited for typo
     
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    #8 Rachox, Apr 13, 2019 at 9:13 AM
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
  9. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I had a terrible time on Metformin plus a statin - but it was not recorded in my notes, and I can't make an adverse report about it as I was taking two medications - and so I can't say what caused the trouble.
    I felt so ill and so down - I did have suicidal thoughts.
    I eat low carb now and had normal test results very quickly.
     
  10. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I generally tolerated Metformin fairly well but got off it as soon as it was no longer necessary.
     
  11. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I had no problems with Metformin either the fast release or extended release.

    Another six weeks and I stop taking it all together, I have already cut my dosage by half.

    I would like to see links to blacklists / deaths etc. not just vague comments about thme.
     
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  12. DawnOfTheZed

    DawnOfTheZed · Well-Known Member

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    I had an upset tummy the first day I took it but so far good tolerance since then. I've wondered if it is what we eat with it that can make effects worse? My suspicions are swallowing it during or just after eating high sugar or carb meal. But I'm too chicken to experiment with that?
    I hope OP discusses all change in meds with own doc and can find a successful route forward.
    I've gone from HbA1c of 54 to 42 in 3 months with moderate low carb diet (75-100 g per day) and lost 10 kg in 7 months (slow and steady). Feeling full, alert and up beat about the future after diagnosis shock.

    Good luck!
     
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  13. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I was eating low carb all the time whilst taking Metformin and Atorvastatin.
    Only meat for the first couple of days and then gradually introducing low carb veges, building up to 50 gm as a maximum. The side effects ramped up when I tried to take two a day, after the first week, but I was already getting gastric issues. I stopped eating early in the day so I could get cleaned up and go out of the house for a few hours, then I ate and drank, taking the tablets mid meal or at the end of the meal to see if one was a better option than the other. That didn't help.
     
  14. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been taking 10 years without any problems
     
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