1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2019 »
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Monthly allowance for healthy food suggested to help tackle type 2 diabetes rates

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. Richie 2

    Richie 2 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    What a load of rot. This country is the archetypal Nanny State.
     
  2. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,288
    Likes Received:
    727
    Trophy Points:
    133
  3. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Trophy Points:
    178
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,288
    Likes Received:
    727
    Trophy Points:
    133
    There is a discussion in that report of how consumption would change IF the current pattern of consumption changed to that suggested in the Eatwell Guide:-
    p32 "Following the guidance would have significant impacts on the average adult diet compared with current eating patterns (Box 2.5): • There would be a large reduction in the consumption of red meat,by 89%for beef and 63% for lamb,together with a 20%decline in dairy products."
    That's not the same as saying the CCC recommends it.

    The report I linked to quotes one of the longer-term milestones to achieving Net Zero as being a '20% cut in consumption of beef, lamb & dairy'.
     
  5. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    2,844
    Trophy Points:
    198
    The link you provide is a progress report for the last year. It does indeed talk of 20% reduction, but this is in the section setting the priorities for the coming year, with an aside mention for longer term milestones. So is that 20% the target for 2025, or 2030 or 2050? or just what is expected for the coming year. It is an imprecise target over an unspecified period, and since the rest of that document is talking a yearly basis. then I think it will be the target for the coming year or possibly 2 years but not the 30 years we have to meet the zero carb emissions target in 2050

    The CCC report 2018 that I posted is the blueprint document and the symmary report does not tell us that any of its targets have been altered or relaxed. If the blueprint is changed then there must be an updated verion or an addenda, which I have not found. The news item I saw on Sky a few days ago was talking about the 2018 targets in the interview with one of the authors. They were discussing how the UK was not yet meeting the targets and that it will need legislation later this year.

    It seems the timescale is 18 months
    https://www.theccc.org.uk/2019/07/1...sts-on-government-action-over-next-18-months/
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    #25 Oldvatr, Jul 19, 2019 at 3:30 PM
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  6. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Trophy Points:
    178
    As I understand it, the new Eatwell scheme will be used as the blueprint for the plans for food production and distribution and imports.
     
  7. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,674
    Likes Received:
    1,309
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Might be a good idea to get Brexit over with before making any plans like that.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    2,844
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Apparently it is called Healthy Start

    https://www.bda.uk.com/news/view?id=248&x[0]=news/list
     
  9. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    8,314
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Great teasing out of the facts ladies and gents.

    I think the initiative proposed could work. It kind of does in my local community. We have farmers markets thriving within a quarter to half mile of well known big and mid range supermarkets in Harwich and Manningtree (Essex). There are local allotments in my village, where 2 of my immediate neighbour's rep a good harvest. If I turn left from my home and drive 2 miles straight in either direction I can get potatoes (if I ate that way), 3 places that sell duck and hens eggs, strawaberries and other fruit.

    Most cities in the UK have smaller towns and the like on the outskirts with loads of land, could these be the answer similar to where I live in a village? Some supermarket brands pretend to be locally supplied, but we have seen the TV programmes, why can't they strike deals with local farms properly.

    All real food protocols such as clean (not judging), carnivore, Vegetarian, Vegan and animal based Keto would / could be satisfied with locally grown and sourced foods. This would mean non ones nose apart from big food, for those who still want to do processed stuff, would be put out of shape.

    I give the initiative a thumbs up, if it could be delivered with the above in mind.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,743
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Just a thought: many who would need the help to access healthy local produce may not have public transport links to outlying places, or be able to afford to run a car, use a taxi etc etc. for small quantities of foods.
     
  11. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    2,844
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I use my wife's mobility scooter, and I do all our shopping with it. I do live in a small country town, not in the wilderness so sympathise with what is becoming a major social issue
     
  12. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    8,314
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I am suggesting that supermarkets buy in good faith from local producers. The situation with general health I feel is almost at war time levels of urgency. No matter which food "we" settle on the quality has to come back yesterday. Humans are the smartest creatures on the planet, we can't process foods ourselves to health.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Christine McMillan

    Christine McMillan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    48
    The Lidl veg box idea could be extended. For those who don’t know, Lidl has a system where 5kg boxes of fruit and/or veg are put together according to grade of product. Its good to eat but getting near a sell by date. Boxes are put out in the morning, any not sold - at an affordable £1.50 each - by noon are given to various food type charities. OK, it can be a bit hit and miss, but I have used and shared three boxes in a week. Being there’s only two if us, both T2, diet controlled, fruit heavy boxes aren’t the best but sharing with neighbours and family obviously encourages, and we have several vegetarians nearby who’ll take thiings we can’t use with pleasure.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,522
    Likes Received:
    2,844
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I and friends used to go to the local market near closing time and relieve them of unsold produce. Does'nt work with supermarkets and there have been several cases in our area od prosecutions for dumpster diving outside their back doors.. Apparenlty the food waste is sent for recycling, and the supermarkets make money from that. It used to be the pig farmer who would collect, not now it is all under contract.

    Anyway I would rather that the money went to the local suppliers than the supermarkets and Big Biz.

    We are starting to see some donations to foodbanks, but there are potential health issues, and the supermarkets do not want to end up being sued.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook