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New And Self-diagnosed

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by bagoodwin, Aug 29, 2018.

  1. bagoodwin

    bagoodwin · Newbie

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    Started testing a week ago (type 2 diabetes runs in the family) and shocked by the results. Fasting levels are higher than going to bed levels (typically 6.5 to 7.5), but go down during the day to between 5.9 to 6.2. Will try the cider apple juice suggested to see if that improves the fasting levels. Had a shock result this evening after an Italian meal out... some hours later was up to 8.8... hoping this is a one-ff hiccup. Have started on a Blood Sugar diet regime when I'm at home all day and not going mad when I'm out. The good news is I'm losing weight already (need to lose 2 to 3 stone). Want to have more test results before seeing the medics and also a better idea on what helps and what is disastrous food-wise and exercise-wise (I cycle on an exercise bike 3 times a week for an hour and I'm pretty fit despite being overweight and I feel pretty good too. Would welcome feedback and advice on next steps.
     
  2. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'll tag @daisy1 to give you all the new member/diabetic info, but it sounds like by the time you get some tests done you may already have achieved non-diabetic levels (you're not far off now). I am not a doctor, so can't diagnose, but doubt those readings are high enough to warrant a diabetic diagnosis, pre-diabetic at most.

    I'm a T1, so don't produce insulin rather than the T2s who are insulin resistant, but have got to say I'm skeptical about cider apple juice, since fruit juice in general is high carb and to be avoided by T2s or pre-diabetics....

    Good luck, I'm sure you'll get lots of good advice once more forum members wake up (I'm in NZ so on a different time zone.)

    ps Oh, and welcome to the forums :)
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @bagoodwin

    Hello Bagoodwin and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  4. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @bagoodwin. Your self testing readings don't sound too bad. Morning fbgs are often higher higher because of 'Dawn Phenomenon' where your liver dumps stored glucose into your bloodstream as you wake to get you going.
    If there is T2 in your family it is a good idea to take action to avoid becoming pre-diabetic and it sounds like you are taking the right steps.
    Only a full HbA1c test will show whether you are actually pre-diabetic, and as @EllieM says your diet regime, exercise and weight loss might mean you will have lowered your bg levels to non-diabetic levels before you have an HbA1c test.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. bagoodwin

    bagoodwin · Newbie

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    Thanks Prem51 - great encouragement to know I'm probably "curable" with a bit of help and discipline. Will be working on it with a friend who studied Dietetics or whatever it's called and specialised in Diabetes -he wants me to get checked out first, whereas I want to know where I am with it (particularly with my high fasting levels) before I see the medics (silly, probably, but that's how I am with GPs),,,
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  6. bagoodwin

    bagoodwin · Newbie

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    Sorry, EllieM… got muddled on the forum and it looked like Prem51 had sent you reply (you'll see it, I guess) thanks a lot for you interest and comments.
     
  7. bagoodwin

    bagoodwin · Newbie

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    Thanks Prem51.... sorry you got the reply intended for EllieM…. but thanks to you too as it really is encouraging to read that my readings aren't overly high at this stage and I really am going to do my utmost as I'm well aware of how potentially serious it can be if one lets it develop. I'm hoping yesterday's high late reading after an Italian meal out was a result of the pasta intake - I'm off to Italy in a few weeks on holiday, so pre-warned is pre-armed!
     
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  8. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    You might find useful info. and guidance on tis site: https://www.bloodsugar101.com
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  9. pollensa

    pollensa · Guest

    Interested in link as not seen this before, and took liberty to take a peep, lots of info on link, I notice, re sugars, no where, unless, I have missed and not seen? in this area does not inform or advise sugars are a mere symptom of the actual root cause, i.e. insulin resistance in D2. Yes, there is much info, yet surprised, same time, no mention sugars been a symptom???
     
  10. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Here is a quote from Jenny Ruhl's site. You can read the full article here: https://www.bloodsugar101.com/how-blood-sugar-control-works

    "Why Insulin Release Fails

    Insulin Resistance

    First and second phase insulin release may fail to do their jobs for several reasons. The most common is a condition called insulin resistance in which some receptors in the liver and the muscle cells stop responding properly to insulin. This means that though there is lots of insulin circulating in the body, the muscles and liver (but not, alas, the fat cells) don't respond until the insulin levels rise much higher

    So when a person's cells become insulin resistant, it will take a lot more insulin than usual to push circulating glucose into cells. In this case, while a person might have a perfectly normal first and second phase insulin response, the first phase response might not produce enough insulin to clear the circulating blood glucose resulting from eating a high carbohydrate meal. Then the second phase response might be prolonged because it takes a long time for beta-cells to secrete of the large amounts of insulin needed to counter the insulin resistance. Eventually the body may not be able to produce enough insulin to clear all the dietary carbohydrate from the bloodstream and blood sugars will rise to abnormal levels.

    If your beta-cells are normal, and if insulin resistance at the muscles and liver is your only problem, over time you may be able to grow new pancreas islets filled with new beta-cells that can store even more insulin for use in first and second phase insulin response. In this case, though your blood sugar may continue to rise into the impaired range and take longer than normal to go back down to normal levels, your blood sugar response may never deteriorate past the impaired glucose tolerance stage to full-fledged diabetes. This is what happens to most people who have what is called "Metabolic Syndrome." Unfortunately, if you have impaired glucose tolerance, there is no way of knowing if you fall into this group or if your rising blood sugars are caused by failing or dying beta-cells.

    Failing beta-cells
    First phase insulin release also fails because beta-cells are dysfunctional or dying. This can happen along with insulin resistance, or without it. Studies have found that some thin, non-insulin resistant relatives of people with Type 2 Diabetes already show signs of beta cell dysfunction."
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
    #10 Alexandra100, Aug 29, 2018 at 12:00 PM
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
  11. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there, do you mean cider apple VINEGAR as opposed to juice????
     
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