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New at Type 2--and overwhelmed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by emkamel, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. emkamel

    emkamel · Member

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    Greetings to all. My husband was just diagnosed as Type 2. The amount of info available is overwhelming! It now seems a full-time job just to get thru the next day. And I thought making dinner was difficult before. . . advice welcome!
     
  2. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Hi emkamel and welcome to the forum :) I know the amount of information you are getting is overwhelming, but you are lucky as a lot of people don't get much information at all when newly diagnosed. After a while you will get things sorted out in your mind and you will just take it all in your stride. It's not really very complicated, and you have really done the best thing to come to this forum. I'm not sure I dare to propose even more information to you but perhaps this will put the rest into perspective. You can ask as many questions as you like here and there is usually someone who will know the answer. This is information we have written for newly diagnosed, new members and I hope this will be helpful to you.

     
  3. emkamel

    emkamel · Member

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    Many thanks for the reply :) We're trying to keep perspective here, but it is difficult to not view every potato as a sneaky villain now. Foods I thought of as wholesome are now potential dangers. It's like navigating a mine field. And I can't serve my husband and my teenage kids just carrots. Yet I can't serve the kids what he can't eat. Getting rid of 'junk food' is easy....but rice? I'm trying to find recipes and meal plans to suit everyone. :?
     
  4. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm the same, just two weeks in.
    I went for low GL, cut out potatoes, rice, pasta, and moved to a couple of slices of Bergen soya and linseed bread. I don't like fat, so that wasn't an option for me.

    I found a few thing on here that seem to work for me

    http://www.the-gi-diet.org/recipes/

    chickpeas and red lentils appear to be ok for me to replace rice with.

    Bear in mind though I only just got here myelf, so I don't have a clue, but I'm down from over 14 fasting, to 8.5 fasting, and 7.5 after meals in two weeks. I still have some readings of 12.5 though, so still fine tuning it.

    The kids still eat normally though, just me that has made a drastic change.
    Sunday was roast chicken, stuffing, roast potatoes, yorkshire pudding.

    Mine was roast chicken, very small roast sweet potato (boiled first), cabbage, beans, and broccoli.

    So the only change to the meal was more veg to be cooked.
     
  5. brambles

    brambles · Member

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    Unlike most I have no problems with carbs.
    I joined slimming world and have eaten increased potatoes, rice and pasta, and loads of fruit and through regular testing these have no ill effects on my blood sugar.After 3 months on the diet and a BMI of 24 my HBA1c reduced from 7.4 to 6.4. My current BMI is 23.4 and I hope to get to 22.5, due another HBA1c next months and expect it to lower again as my blood readings are lowering all the time.

    I am not saying this works for everyone, but I have lost 23lbs which has greatly improved my diabetes.
    I was just in the overweight range when I decided to tackle my weight. (Interestingly in normal range when diagnosed T2 just over a year ago.)

    And I can't do lentils unlike the last post-they rocket my readings (split grains don't like me)
    It will all make sense in time but is a lot to deal with initially. Good Luck
     
  6. emkamel

    emkamel · Member

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    Wow, thanks to all! It seems we'll have to make an individualised game plan, based on trial & error and his readings. The doctor left us with unhelpful warnings of just don't eat this, this and that--leaving us with precious little to choose from. Reading personal experiences here is encouraging that common sense can prevail. Well done on both of you for your initial success and positive attitudes--so there is life after being diagnosed? Fingers crossed!
     
  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. My wife has had to change meal plans since my diagnosis many years ago. Yes, it's not easy particularly if you have a family. In general reduce the carbs and the high-GI ones but as Brambles has said we're not all the same, so do get your husband to test. My wife focuses on the protein and veg and keeps quantities of carbs such as potatoes, rice, pasta, pie pastry etc down. You don't need to worry too much about fat, in sensible amounts, which is the good news and fats do help slow down carb absorption. Desserts are a problem so I have zero fat and zero carb yoghurt and when we have apple crumble she will use splendour etc. You don't have to be obesssive about the rules all the time so we will occasionally have take-away fish and chips which no doubt increase the BS. Do read food labels and watch out for added sugar in everything; this does take time but usually there are better options for other suppliers such as 85% Dark Chocolate. Cakes can be a no-no other than low sugar full fruit but I have crumpets or muffins which are quite low carb. My daughter-in-law bakes me 'Molly' cake which has no added sugar and is great. It takes time but slowly you'll learn what is best!
     
  8. carty

    carty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi emkamel
    Just keep reading on this forum you will get lots of good food ideas as well as support .When I was first diagnosed the only advice I got from my GP was (eat lots of fruit and veg but not melon or mango) :!: With advice from here and testing what I eat my Hba1c is 6.5 and it was over 15 when diagnosed
    CAROL
     
  9. emkamel

    emkamel · Member

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    We really appreciate the support here--it will take time to adjust, but your 'success stories' are great encouragement! Many thanks! :)
     
  10. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There is another way emkamel, I have great control but eat everything my family eat bar white bread and pasta, I just learned to only eat as much carbs as I could cope with so for me that means 5 or 6 baby new potatoes or 3 or 4 halves of medium new potatoes (approx 80g = 13.6g of carbs).

    1 or two spoonfuls of basmati rice, about a cupped handful ( I've never weighed it but this much does little to my bg levels)

    And for lunch most days I eat a sandwich with two slices of either Burgen bread or Tesco's Rustic Wholegrain bread both of which I am well able to cope with.

    You might think from reading this forum of late that everyone is an ultra low carber but nothing could be further from the truth. I now eat between 80g and 130g of carbs a day and always return an HbA1c in the 5%'s, but I trained myself to eat less of everything, so I eat the same as the rest of the family (I'm not a leper) I just eat less than the rest of the family.

    You need to work out what you can eat and the only way to do that is to test, test, test, test, test and then test again. Once you get your bg levels under control most people can manage to live a normal life and to eat a normal diet.
     
  11. viviennem

    viviennem Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sid is quite right, emkamel, when he says that ultra-low-carbing is not the only way! I eat that way, because I find it easy, because it keeps my blood glucose levels low, but most of all because I know I will lose weight on the diet - and I have a lot to lose :D

    We are all different, and we can't all eat the same things. Sid and others manage perfectly well controlling their carb intake to a level of about 150g daily; others make sure they eat only Low Glycaemic Index carbs, which affect the blood glucose more slowly. Some can eat more carbs than others.

    The best thing is to buy a Carb Counter book (Collins Gem series do a pocket-sized one) and test before and 2 hours after every meal so that your husband can see how different foods affect his readings. For instance, 3 potatoes may make his readings high; one may be fine! We're all different!

    As you say, it's daunting at first, but you'll soon learn - and if you do it as a family, getting the kids involved with reading food labels, and weighing portions to calculate the carbs, you'll make it into a game, improve their arithmetic, and teach them a bit about healthy eating all at the same time :D .

    He can still have treats - no point making life miserable, after all. I drink wine sometimes (too much and too often :oops: ); I very occasionally eat fish and chips or curry, and I enjoy birthdays and Christmas. Chocolate - go for anything with cocoa solids over 70% (85% pr 90% are best), and eat small portions. If he has a really really favourite food that is impossibly high in carbohydrates - well, that becomes a small treat on birthdays and Christmas. Always something to look forward to. :p

    Life doesn't end at diagnosis. For instance, exercise is good for us, it helps to control blood glucose. There are people on here who go swimming, play badminton, run marathons, go ski-ing - in fact, if it can be done, diabetics do it! So don't despair!

    Did you know that Sir Steve Redgrave, the Olympic rower, is diabetic - and was when he won every one of his gold medals?

    Don't be afraid to come on here and ask any questions you like - or have a rant or a moan. There'll always be someone to help and understand.

    FInally - have a look at WhitbyJet's recipes posted on the Low Carb Recipes forum. If you enjoy cooking, there's lots there to please the whole family :p

    Let us know how you all go on.

    Viv 8)
     
  12. layla b

    layla b · Newbie

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    Hello there - relieved to find others as confused as me, even though I was diagnosed with Type 2 about 5 years ago. My blood sugar was under 7 then, and I had never had any problems (am now 67). I seemed to manage ok for several years with a healthy diet and a bit of exercise. However, my blood sugar has now gone up to 10 + so I am trying out medication (Metformin), which doesn't seem to be doing me a great deal of good.

    Waiting now to see GP again to see what else is available, but beginning to feel a bit depressed as it all seems so complicated ....
     
  13. emkamel

    emkamel · Member

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    The most significant thing I've picked up on in reading forum posts is that we don't need to label someone diagnosed with diabetes as 'a diabetic' as though this is your new identity which will dictate your entire life. I am telling myself to say instead that we are handling the challenge of diabetes---along with all life's other challenges. Everyone here is so unique, and each handles his own condition differently from the others. This variety seemed scary at first--like there are a thousand different ways to deal with this, how the heck am I meant to know what to do? But slowly--in reading these snippets of people's lives--I'm realising that the variety is a blessing. There are many solutions and we can pick what works for us. With the simple tool of testing levels, we can manage this even without a professional telling us what to do.

    And the other wonderfully significant thing I've picked up on here is that strangers are willing to be a friend. In these days of constant conflict in the news, it is refreshing to see how many people across the world (and all we have in common are English and diabetes) are turning to each other to give and to receive friendly support. Wow. Too bad the goodness in people rarely if ever makes the news!
     
  14. storm

    storm Type 2 · Member

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    I'm relatively new to diabetes (Type 2) , six months or so, and initially I was totally overwhelmed by it all and did not cope at all well psychologically.

    I think my low point was then I had diarrhoea from Metformin, a urinary tract infection, a tooth abscess and my first HB1AC was 13%

    However 6 months on I have managed to loose 3 stones, kick my 40 a day smoking habit, taking regular exercise. My last test results where 6%

    Total agree with testing, it really does help understanding how different food effects you and also the time of day seems to be a factor (I'm very sensitive in the mornings, but much improved in the evenings). Why my Doctor will not prescribe the test strips is beyond me.
     
  15. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    Well done - that's a great achievement!
     
  16. tiny cat

    tiny cat · Newbie

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    To Storm: I had similar problems on metformin. It was a couple of years before the diabetes doctor at the hospital suggested slow-release metformin. The difference has been amazing. All those symptoms have gone and I feel much better. Ask your doctor.
    The whole thing seems very hit-and-miss and follow-up on symptoms is not great. I thought I just had to cope with it.
     
  17. mrawfell

    mrawfell · Well-Known Member

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    First relax, I was diagnosed as T2 about 8 months ago. It was a surprise and a shock. I know just how serious a disese diabetes is. It was a routine annual blood test the showed it. Doc put me on Galvusmet, which is 500mg Metformin, and 50mg Sitagliptin. I kept trying to manage by diet alone, ( I don't live in the UK so I buy my own test strips ). I would be OK then start drifting up, why I don't know no change in food. Back to the Doc and said I can't get along with these tablets, my gut was in a mess. So changed to just Sitagliptin 50 mg, now everything is OK. ( Sort of one side effect is increase in wieght and I want to get rid of a few kilos). I did change my diet and my wife is quite happy to prpare me a modified meal. Same meat or fish, and veg, but I have no white potatoes or short grain rice. You need to find the glycemic index chart that posted on this site a few months back. I don't eat white bread just 2 slices of wholemeal bread a day at lunch time. ( It is unsliced so I am sure I am generous with the slices ).
    When ever I test I am under 6 so I am content.
    Don't panic just make a few adjustments and hopefully everything will settle down.
    I am fortunate in that as I am not in the UK then medical care is payable. However my doctor is very friendly, doesn't charge me for a consultation or presciption, and is willing to sit and discuss things. A consultation can normally last upwards of 20 minutes, not like the UK GP allowance of 5 minutes, and very little discussion.
    Just hang in, and be patient, you will sort it out.
     
  18. HpprKM

    HpprKM · Well-Known Member

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    Not much I can add to all of the wonderful information given above, but just want to say that this forum is the best place to start. I have been diagnosed 3 years now, and I am still learning - information can only be acquired a bit at a time. Just follow the suggestions and links that others have given, and remember that no question is too silly, forum members are very good at answering - whilst not experts many of them have a wealth of information and have tons of experience from their own and others' research - in my view that is the best way to learn about this very complex illness. Most of all - they are supportive and even when you are down there is some one out there to help pick you up :D

    Although we know that carbs are not good for you, despite what my NHS Diabetic nurse says - some will argue this point - personally I cannot give up carbs and luckily they do not affect me too badly (must stress that this is not the same for all diabetics) I just try to eat smaller quantities and eat Bergen bread and buy Vivaldi potatoes as they are lower in carbs, low Gi pasta when possible. In all cases I only have small portions in each.
     
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