1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

New Diagnosis - Type 1

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Donna1984, Dec 19, 2019.

  1. Donna1984

    Donna1984 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi everyone,

    I was diagnosed with Type 1 just over a month ago and I'm finding it all very hard to control! Is it normal to have daily hypos In the beginning? I literally can't walk for more than 10 minutes with my b.s. dropping crazy amounts, although sometimes the drop is delayed.. They always happen at Inconvenient times too. Also, my body always feels like it's burning under the skin lately!! Any help appreciated. :)

    Thanks
    Donna
     
  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,095
    Likes Received:
    6,516
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @Donna1984 and welcome :)

    Daily hypos isn't great and not good when newly diagnosed, you need to speak to your DSN first thing tomorrow and get your insulin adjusted, when your newly diagnosed you will enter a honeymoon phase and insulin needs will drop so getting your doses adjusted is vital, it's temporary but that's why your team should keep a close eye on you and help you change your ratios to help you avoid them. Are you carrying fast acting glucose everywhere and I do mean everywhere like next to your bed, in your bag, car if you drive etc ?

    In the meantime increase your carbs so eat a bag of crisps or biscuit until your doses have been adjusted to help you avoid them, they aren't pleasant and its best to avoid them as much as you can, hopefully you will get some support from your team soon.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    306
    Likes Received:
    222
    Trophy Points:
    103
    It will take time to learn everything you need to know in order to achieve a measure of control. What is your insulin regime? Are you counting carbs?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Donna1984

    Donna1984 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi @Juicyj,

    I did wonder if the honeymoon period was starting as they're just very erratic. I can't walk for long periods without having a hypo. I have been eating extra carbs too, but there's just no pattern at all. I keep emergency jelly babies and digestive biscuits with me at all times.. I feel like I get support but not much help working out carb ratio yet as it is too early so they don't want to give me all the information at once. Thank you for responding to me though :) x
     
  5. Donna1984

    Donna1984 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Hi @JAT1,

    I have been using a basic 1:10 carb ratio for now and taking Novarapid with my 3 meals, also with a set Basal dose each morning. When I know I'm going out i cut the fast acting down and eat more but it seems to be getting increasingly worse with the hypos.. Feeling anxious to go back to work like this. X
     
  6. ert

    ert Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,416
    Likes Received:
    1,633
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I'm sorry but the hyposensitivity you describe sounds like a stress reaction that I had when I first started injecting insulin. It's worth phoning the diabetes nurse from your diabetes team to ask about hyposensitivity and also about exercise.

    I complete two 50 minute exercise sessions morning and night and did struggle with hypos during or after the night session in the beginning The morning session is completed before breakfast so hasn't ever been an issue. I suggest that you try waiting two hours after injecting short-acting insulin to exercise. This was recommended by DAFNE. I change my meal times to accommodate this into my routine. If this doesn't help, then you need to reduce your basal insulin on days you exercise. I halve mine, which was recommended by my consultant.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #6 ert, Dec 20, 2019 at 7:22 AM
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
  7. Donna1984

    Donna1984 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    @ert

    I did see the consultant yesterday and he has advised reducing my basal. Although that seems to be stable as within rang when I wake. He also mentioned playing around with different rations depending on what I do. I only used .5 to 10 carbs ratio while walking yesterday and still i had a hypo. Probably due to walking straight after insulin and lunch? I also worryingly keep getting pins and needle in my feet but thought foot problems were from years of bad control.. :( thank you for your helpful advice x
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Donna1984

    Donna1984 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    On advice of consultant I am going to try a different ratio for each different thing I do. 1.15 works if I'm doing nothing but watching t.v. but I think I need to do 1.30 when walking outside as 1.20 didn't work. Or maybe I need to not walk straight after fast acting and good xx

    Moderator comment: this post has edited just to remove a quote which gave medical advice - which is against our forum rules.
    Donna’s post has not been edited.
     
    #8 Donna1984, Dec 21, 2019 at 11:04 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 21, 2019
  9. The Pirate Twins

    The Pirate Twins Type 1 · BANNED

    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    38
    It's a bit of trial and error, even us that have been T1 for many years still experiment with ratios.
    Your approach is good, it is good to have an open mind. You are doing well and you may still be on the "honey moon" period which can throw curve balls.
    Lots to learn.
     
  10. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    20,862
    Likes Received:
    34,488
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi All,

    A post has been deleted from this thread because it gave advice on medication doses.

    This is just a gentle reminder to everyone that forum members, no matter what their qualifications, experience, and desire to help, must not give medical advice. Please see the forum ethos and rules link in my signature, for more details.

    Rather than giving medical advice, we can all speak from our personal experiences (if we have them), encourage members to learn, post links to information, and encourage them to seek medical advice where appropriate.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    450
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I find at different times of the day my ratios can be very different. I am active for 2-3 hours after breakfast so take very little when I wake up. I tend to have a 2nd breakfast mid morning when I'll be sitting in front of a laptop - and that ratio is very different.

    It is trial and error annoyingly.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. ronialive

    ronialive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    252
    Likes Received:
    148
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Hi, At the beginning there is so much to learn and your diabetic team need to learn about how your body responds also.

    Basic fact- when you exercise your carry more sugar out of the blood to the body cells for them to function so you have to think about putting more in or if planned dropping insulin first.
    To start- just think- carry glucose always. If going for a walk or a swim - eat first. It does get easier as you learn other ways.

    Insulin ratios will need to change so once your honey moon period is over then your diabetic team should teach you to do this.

    There is a training course called DAFNE= ask to go on it and it will help.
    You need to become your own doctor nurse and dietitian so just take your time and keep asking questions
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Goma5

    Goma5 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi, I’m 9 months in now and was fortunate to be able to control my diabetes with diet, excersize and no fast acting insulin for a few months. When I first started using novorapid it was like rocket fuel - had a hypo after 5-10 mins from 2 units but It did calm down massively over the following months.

    I think when still in a bit of a honeymoon which it sounds like you are- it’s possible to get away with some flexibility in your ratios. Everyone is different though! Generally I find it’s enough to look at a plate of food and estimate- and using something like the nutri-check app helps a lot

    In my opinion, There is a lot to be said for testing extensively initially to help understand how it all works-particularly if you excersize. although this might not be for everyone!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook