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New symptoms.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by donnamyatt, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. donnamyatt

    donnamyatt Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi. This is my first post but have been diabetic for 41 years. I've always been able to tell when I'm going hypo but recently I have had no warning signs. Does anyone else ever have this? I've got a clever girl dog who is not trained with any illness but she makes me aware and also alerts my husband. She is the 2nd Labrador that we have had that has done this. The first one sat on my chest to wake me up. Such clever things.
     
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  2. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That is awesome, how low do you have to go before she warns you?

    Unfortunately loss of hypo awareness seems to be a factor for some long term T1s. I have to be very very careful (nearly 50 years T1 here), as though I feel uncomfortable/edgy when I get low (and I still wake when low) my awareness is nothing like it used to be. If I have too many hypos I risk losing awareness altogether and the only way to get it back appears to be to keep my levels above 6 for a few weeks, Long term, I seem to lose awareness once my hba1c goes below 48ish, so am working really hard to keep my bg above 5 most of the time. Basically, I do a bg test whenever I leave the house. (And multiple tests at the gym). I average 50 tests a week. This normally keeps me from going hypo.

    I was doing really well (1 hypo or less a week) but yesterday was terrible and I've had to reduce my basal. I know I'll lose awareness pretty well completely if I have too many hypos in a short period.

    In your position I'd go for a continuous glucose monitor (eg libre) if I could afford it or get it prescribed, but unfortunately it doesn't work for my body. You can get a cgm linked to your phone to send alarms when you go too low (eg 4.5 or 5mmol/L) so that you hopefully don't reach hypo levels.

    Anyway am really interested in any way to train a dog to detect hypos, if that can be done when I'm still OK enough to give myself sugar.... (Am envisioning a St Bernard carrying a packet of glucose tablets instead of brandy. :)) I love my little black kelpie dearly, but I don't think she's got it in her to detect hypos for me.

    Good luck. (And remember that hypo awareness can be improved by running a bit higher for a while).

    ps Edited to add: and welcome to the forums.
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hello @donnamyatt My dog has jumped on my lap before wanting me to play ball with him when i've been going low and he's a terrier, it surprised me he could sense, but was also quite a comfort.

    Great advice from @Ellie-M

    I'd second the CGM advice if you don't use one already, very useful for identifying trends, seeing the direction of your BG levels and being able to act before levels drop too low, the NHS advice is to run slightly higher to improve hypo sensitivity. It could be a one off as your levels could of been dropping very quickly so hoping your incident was a one off and that this isn't an issue, If you drive it could impact on your ability to do so if you do lose this awareness so hope it's not an issue for you. Best wishes J
     
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  4. Gloucestergirl

    Gloucestergirl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've had diabetes for 25 years, since the age of 49 and after going from levels of 22 I would get hypo symptoms when I only got down to 9. It took a while to get down to "normal" levels which at that time were between 4 and 7. I went onto insulin after 8 years and had to make sure I tested frequently. I only needed to give myself about three units per meal but there were quite a few times when I would do a bit more walking or more housework or it was warm or I was stressed and I would go hypo. Several times I would test before going out and after being out for an hour or more shopping I would drive home thinking I was Ok and find that my sugar was 2.9 or even lower and yet I had NO hypo symptoms at all. When I was first diagnosed the doctors etc. were more interested in the high sugar levels but over the years they are more concerned about the lower ones. My diabetes nurse told me to run my sugar levels higher for a few weeks and then should get my hypo awareness back, I tried this and it worked. Another diabetes nurse said that keeping to lower "normal" levels is more for younger people but ones of my age (74) should aim for 8-9 before meals and 10-12 before bed. Sometimes I only need to give myself one or two units per meal and haven't had a hypo for a long time as my levels are usually between those numbers. As for the Freestyle Libre, I would definitely try and get one on prescription. I tried them but had to pay for them but had to stop using them as I have a blood problem and have to be careful of infections so I found them really useful as I never knew that I was going low during the night.
     
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  5. AntonioG

    AntonioG Type 1 · Newbie

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    Unfortunately, you have to 'juggle' between low's and high's and that is a very narrow bar. I rarely get signs and that has led me to hospital a couple of times. The worst part, however is the what people see and the way I treat them. It really causes me to go down when I get my senses back. Science is so advanced, but I wish it was far better for us.
     
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  6. avebabe62

    avebabe62 · Newbie

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    Hi Iv only been diabetic for 2yrs but now I can go as low as 2.3 without any symptoms I do have a libre but it's never right either reads lower or higher so if it reads 4 something I could be 2 something I always then have to finger prick to make sure I'm not low as my hypo aweness has gone which isn't good.
     
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  7. donnamyatt

    donnamyatt Type 1 · Newbie

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    Wow. Thank you all for your advice and help. I will try your ideas and let you know.
    EllieM, It depends really on what I'm doing when I go low. When I'm in bed she normally gets me up at about 3.8. The thing is as well I can hypo at 4 and feel dreadful or hypo at 2 or even lower and feel fine.
    I will be speaking to my G.P about a libre, again thank you for your help.
    Keep safe and keep smiling. Xx
     
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  8. stevef67

    stevef67 · Newbie

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    My sympathies. Hypos are a nightmare and, because the human body is not a machine, unpredictable at times. I have been a Type 1 for just over 52 years (I am 70 next month) and still get hypos (occasionally) unexpectedly. I have been on a Medtronic pump for 7 years and on their CGM for 3. I am on a 640G, which cuts out basal when your bs dips and is great but not infallible. I am looking forward to getting a 670G, hopefully next year, which constantly monitors your glucose levels and adjusts basal insulin accordingly. I have heard great things about the 670G and consider both Medtronic devices to be superior to flash devices. They are dear though and so CCGs take some persuading to finance them.
     
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  9. Roxyharford

    Roxyharford Type 1 · Member

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    Yes I was diagnosed with Hypoglaecemic Unawareness and I’m sorry to say it 1st started 10 years ago after the birth of my twins.
    I had T1 for 42 years and have taken good care of myself and my HbA1c was always good as it was an average of my highs and lows, the Hospital took far more notice when I funded my own Libre but they then transferred me onto a DEXCOM G6 as it benefits you be having inbuilt alarms to warn you when going low as I could still be walking round making meals for my children whilst my B.S. was in the 1st.
    I am however amazingly fortunate as I was added to the Pancreas Transplant list last April & received my Pancreas Transplant 6 months ago now and am no longer Diabetic... no more Insulin ... it’s still odd and I often go to have my nighttime & then remember I don’t need it.
    There are lots of options but I would very strongly suggest the Dexcom G6 vs the Libre as it gives you the confidence & ability to self manage with the data it produces, inbuilt alarm and weekly report of your results which the Hospital Drs can log into.
    Good luck and any questions please just ask Claire x
     
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  10. Blip22

    Blip22 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Amazing to hear about your clever dogs, my sheep have similar skills, and my cats used to know when I was sick, sadly passed away now. Yes it's quite possible to go hypo without knowing. I once experienced no symptoms except realising my actions were nonsensical, i.e. running a bath, putting on my coat to go out, then trying to make a phone call..., and then suddenly realising my actions were crazy! When I checked my blood sugar it was 1.9mmol! I couldn't believe it, I double checked on another meter, yes 1.9mmol. In this case I believe it was because it had reached this level very slowly giving my body a chance to adapt, until it reached a critical level. Soon after taking the reading in fact, I did get all the classical symptoms: sweating, shaking. The speed and relative change in blood sugar levels effects presentation. Autonomic neuropathy can also cause non recognition of hypoglycemia.
     
  11. Brodiebear

    Brodiebear Type 2 · Active Member

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    I just dont get how sometimes a low blood level makes you go 'hypo' yet other times it doesnt. If my bloods drop below 6 i usually have a hypo - i now its coming so can deal with it. Earlier last year i had a severe hypo without any warning, to the point where i started to zone out (according to people stood next to me). However we also went to Florida last year and concerned about walking in the heat i tested myself regularly throughout the day. To my surprise most days my bloods were below six, but no hypos and no hypo symptoms, I usually had something to eat once i had taken a low reading, but still strange how the human body works. Maybe walking over 5 miles a day and drinking over 8 litres of water in temperatures of plus eighty helped !.
     
  12. RogerRam

    RogerRam Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi, we are retired in France. T1 56 years A1 thingy 5.3%. Here I use Libre with a MiaoMiao Bluetooth sender, Fiasp insulin & an Omnipod tubeless pump. Have little hypo awareness hence I check BS with my watch & phone. Would love a Dexcom G6 but only the G5 is available here at the moment. I think over the years my body has adapted to having a LO. My diabétologue/consultant said my BS is close to that of a normal person BUT I have too many LOs. I have noticed that my watch is a little behind readings on my phone so when I was dog-walking watch said 4.5 so I did not take any Glucotabs. BUT saw it was 3.7 on my phone when I got home. Hope some of this is helpful. Key thing for me is to lose weight. Present regime is the best for me so far. Best wishes
     
  13. Mike_T

    Mike_T Type 1 · Member

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    I saw my diabetes consultant last week and he spoke about the requirements to be changed over to the freestyle libre. I met non of the conditions but one condition he mentioned was if you were testing bg at least 8 times a day. I was doing 5/6 a day so we agreed that I would start checking 8 times a day from then. He’s arranging an appointment with the nurse in three months time where I will take my meter and if I can show that I’m doing the required number of tests she will start me on the libre.
    One thing I’ve noticed straightaway from testing this number a day is how much more in control my blood sugar is. The last 7 days it’s averaged 6.0, the last 90 days it’s averaged 9.2, obviously including this last week. When I checked the 90 day average before I started last week it was was over 11. I’m amazed at the results but the cost of doing this in terms of test strips is more expensive than using the libre so bring it on.
     
  14. RogerRam

    RogerRam Type 1 · Active Member

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  15. RogerRam

    RogerRam Type 1 · Active Member

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    Have an idea that Libres can be bought for about £35 in some Asda Pharmacies. We self-funded here in France for a while until it became readily available on prescription. Well worth it in my opinion.
     
  16. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Gosh! Fascinating, how did you come to realise your sheep were so clever? x
     
  17. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mike, do you mean they are much more in control because your extra testing means you can intervene and do something about it? If your numbers are showing improvement it is because YOU are doing something positive as obviously whether you test once a day or 20 times a day your glucose levels are still the same if your approach remains the same. I am currently on a diabetes course (talking about Libres) and the results from a libre are looked at in conjunction with the hb1ac test so they can judge if there has been any issues or improvement whilst using a libre, ie the libre readings are not looked at in isolation. You may mean that those extra tests are showing you that your averages are lower than you thought whilst doing fewer tests so apologies if I'm mistaken. x
     
  18. clanders

    clanders Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi. I'm a type 1 diagnosed in 1972 as a 10 year old. I coped well on isophane and porcine insulin. I lost hypo awareness when switched (while pregnant) to human insulin. I have severe and frequent hypos and now have a Libre Freestyle as well as a care package. I'm being given a CGM on 4th February which will notify the care team. (Arthritis means I can't open hypostops). I think I'm just used to hypos, I continue to enjoy life often walking up to 12-16 miles a day with my beautiful dogs. If you're a driver you need to let DVLC know if you have lost hypo awareness. Good luck
     
  19. Jaxx

    Jaxx · Member

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    Hi. I was diagnosed type 1 in 1970, at the age of 23, and lost hypo symptoms about 3 years ago. I had none of the classic diabetic complications but couldn't tell at all even when my BG was less than 2. My consultant advised that at that stage hypos were far more dangerous than hypers and my BG targets were increased significantly in an attempt to regenerate hypo symptoms/awareness. It didn't work. In fact I thought that had since been found to be an unacceptable treatment! I did eventually get to try the FreeStyle Libre, but as that only shows what has been happening it did nothing to reduce the constant blood testing that was needed for everyday living. I'd reached the stage where I couldn't drive the car, go out shopping or anywhere else alone, start cooking a meal, or even go to sleep at night and know I'd wake up. Then I was lucky enough to be granted a 6-month CGM trial with my Medtronic pump and EnLite sensors. That has now been extended to a year and it has changed my life. And my husband's!! It's not necessarily simple but it is amazing and has been well worth the effort to learn the system and get back to living a normal life....that includes both belly dancing and scuba diving around the world again :)
     
  20. lindaburner

    lindaburner Type 1 · Member

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    Diagnosed 47 years ago as T1. Lost hypo symptoms about 2 yrs ago. My Australian Kelpie dog saved my life many times having lows overnight. Sadly he died, so I managed to get funding for CGM last July, but have no warning at 2.8! I'm doing so many blood tests I cannot feel my fingertips any more. The Guardian 3 sensor is regularly 3-4 mmol out compared to a BG. Has anyone tried any better CGM?
     
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