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new to diabetes

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by garrysteele, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    hi forum, I am a 44 year old male and ive just been told I have type 2. I have been given 2x 500g metmorfin and a statin.
    the doc said I had a number of 123 on the docs computer screen she says this is high and I have to keep healthy no suger no takeaways and left me to get on with it myself, I have no blood meter nothing. I have googled it a lot but I found fact goes into fiction and seen some outrageous claims by people, so I have decided to ask the people who suffer to tell me truths.
    biggest problem for me is my legs have lost all muscle and its constant niggle pain mainly in my calfs. I think my doctor thinks I know all about diabeties as she just gave me my prescription with a word saying change my lifestyle and no suger.thank you all and I look forward to reading more as I get used to this diabetic world.
     
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  2. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome,

    Yes, your level of 123 is high. That will have been your HbA1c test.
    Yes, keep away from sugar and take-aways.
    Yes, learn from people who are diabetic.
    Yes, this forum and the main website will help and support you, with everything you need to know.

    You also need to learn about the role of carbohydrate, not just sugar. All carbs convert to glucose once inside the system and this will raise your blood sugar levels. Bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, cereals and flour are the worst culprits.

    I suggest you buy your own glucose meter. This is what most of us type 2s here have to do. The Codefree has the cheapest test strips

    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/

    You can then test before eating and a couple of hours later to see what that meal has done to your blood glucose levels, and from this you can learn which foods are suitable and which aren't, and also which can be eaten in small quantities.

    I will tag @daisy1 who will come along with some excellent information for new comers. Meanwhile, have a good read round the forum posts and the main website (from Home on the navigation bar)
     
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  3. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Welcome @garrysteele :)

    There are lots of friendly and helpful Type 2s here :) First, let me tag @daisy1 as she has some basic info.

    Many Type 2s find it extremely helpful to,test their blood sugar at home so they can see how they're doing.
     
  4. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Garry, you're not on statins by any chance are you?
     
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  5. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    yes I have to take 1 20mg of simvasstain at night, also metformin 2x500mg.
     
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  6. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @garrysteele
    Hi Garry. Bless ya - you must be terrified, I was but 3 short months ago. Hopefully you should get an appointment with a practice nurse who specialises in Diabetes - ask for one if you haven't. I found they usually have more time and will explain quite a lot (hopefully). The key elements to this are, exercise and activity if you weren't active, achieve a healthy weight if you are overweight, and the bit you were advised on - diet, with the key here being healthy, i.e cut the '****' which I'm sure you know what I mean. As alluded to, you do need to be more conscious of carbohydrates and their role in blood sugar. Just playing devils advocate here, most of the views on this site are at odds with other sites and the NHS etc ..... Get used to conflicting info / advice.
    If it's any consolation my initial 'reading' was 97, so also quite high. 3 months on that is now 53 - not far off 'normal' and expected lower this month. I'm 4 stone lighter, soooo much more active (and enjoying it) and eating a very healthy diet .... Just like we all should.
    Still gutted at my 'label' - but fighting it head on!
    Good luck
     
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  7. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    yes dawn I take 20mg of simvastatin at night, is this good/bad
     
  8. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    well thank you so much for your straight forward answers and advice, I haven't seen a practice nurse or specialist yet, but will do next 10 days, I hope to come out of the docs with alot more info than I have now. you seem to be upbeat and positive about the future all the very best and thanks again, god bless
     
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  9. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @garrysteele - Hello and Welcome to the Forum :). Have a good read of the information from daisy1 when it is posted. And don't be afraid to ask as many questions as you want, there will always be someone to answer.
     
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  10. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    thank you azure, god bless
     
  11. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @garrysteele my message probably belies the truth! ..... If I'm honest I'm still sacred, and struggling to emotionally come to terms with it all. If you read my posts from the outset you will see the mess I was in. I have however had terrific support from my NHS practice, good advice and learning from in here - and other websites, and most important of all have had the most amazing help and total support from my wife - I genuinely don't think I would have made it this far without her.
    I'm still grieving to an extent for my old life - but keep promising myself a VERY occasional visit there - which keeps me going. I have channelled my anger and frustration with myself in trying to get as normal (whatever that is!) as possible.
    Look at the info, listen to ALL the advice given - then do what is right for YOU, not anyone else! ..... So far so good for me!
     
  12. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    By the way ..... I'm not on ANY medication I told em I didn't want any...... That was MY incentive to get all of my numbers down, BP, BMI, Blood Glucose, hba1c and Cholestetol ..... All ticks in the boxes now and ALL absolutely normal' - except hba1c which is nearly there!
     
  13. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you have problems with your calf muscles, ask your GP to put you onto a different statin. Many people complain of stabbing pains, cramps, joint pains etc. I was on Atorvastatin but, for cost reasons, I got put on Simvastatin. Then I got all the above. When that GP had to resign, the new locum put me back on Atorvastatin saying it was the same cost thesedays. Most of the problems have gone, though not quite all. I feel very much more comfortable though.

    Otherwise, as posters point out, no sugar but, to which many of us would add, no white bread and what proper wholegrain bread you do eat, be stingy with your portion sizes.

    Diet and losing a lot of weight helps greatly. It is not a media myth. It is the key to getting things under control.
     
  14. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @garrysteele

    Hello Garry and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information, mentioned 3 times!, which we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. A Low Carb/High Fat diet is very helpful to most members and I suggest you try it. Have a look at the link to the Low Carb Program too which should give you an idea of the best things to include in your diet. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 150,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    LOW CARB PROGRAM:
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/low carb program


    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  15. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Do you know what your cholesterol numbers were? There is a lot of discussion here and elsewhere about the effectiveness of statins and their side effects. Have you had a coronary event ever?
     
  16. dawnmc

    dawnmc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Do ask for your cholesterol readings Garry, also statins can cause diabetes. How long have you been on them?
     
  17. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Can you let us know more about your weight or BMI. It is important to know if you are slim. Note that statins have nothing to do with diabetes but should relate to your lipids breakdown i.e. HDL, LDL and Trig. Ask your GP what these figures are and whether your ratios are good or bad as these are indicators for possibly taking statins. Any muscle pains are a warning sign that statins may not be right for you. Yes, do buy a meter.
     
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  18. grand mort

    grand mort Type 2 · Member

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    Mate, please read up about Statins on the net. Not a nice drug.
     
  19. garrysteele

    garrysteele · Member

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    well that was a strong willed decision not to take meds, I wish I was as headstrong as you heretic, I am strong but since being told I have type 2 I have been breaking down everywhere in shops in my flat I lost my mum last year, so my aim is not to let this get to me emotionally and try and be as strong as I can. thanks heretic
     
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  20. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @garrysteele i too have other emotional problems currently and think 'it' has kinda tipped me over the edge somewhat. I was always an incredibly 'strong' person, but I think I have broken down and cried more often in the last 3 months than in more years than I can remember combined. I really don't know how my wife has put up with me. I don't consider myself strong willed anymore - my motivation is fuelled by fear, a place I now live in!
     
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