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New to insulin - loneworking question

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by sugar-rush123, Jun 11, 2017.

  1. sugar-rush123

    sugar-rush123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone,

    At work its quite difficult right now and we are short staffed which means ive been rota'd on to do extra late shifts (i dont have a choice it seems).

    Problem is ive just been put on novorapid this past week and if im at work alone im really worried if something were to happen.(last week i was vomiting at home and it happened so quick the hypo- i felt so dizzy but my husband helped me). An example is my colleague leaves around 5.30 and im in til 10pm and i cant really leave my work station to have a proper meal and inject etc..

    What are my rights here does anyone have experience of this? Im nearly 16wks now.

    Sorry its long but i appreciate your help thank you
     
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  2. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  3. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Does your boss know you are pregnant and an insulin dependant diabetic?
     
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  4. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The Equality Act 2010 requires employers to make reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities, and being on insulin counts. It's a tricky area of law, though, so you might want to give the Equality and Human Rights Commission a phone on their helpline 0808 800 0082

    https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en
     
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  5. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    A risk assessment should have been done for pregnancy, and now your circumstances have changed (you're now on insulin) that should be re-examined.

    It's very possible your employer doesn't really understand so has assumed you can do this ok. Perhaps you could speak to your doctor/DSN?
     
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  6. sugar-rush123

    sugar-rush123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for your replies i work as a shift manager in a hotel so i am the only member of staff at times yes apart from guests. They do know im on insulin but as i went on annual leave they will look into it when i return but in the past ive seen things havent been taken seriously before. Im due to see my diabetic midwife tues so will ask more then but im just abit worried about what they can ask me to do/not do. Thank you scott for that phone number , thanks everyone
     
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  7. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @sugar-rush123 . Advice from everyone so far is probably your best course of action.
    I'm not overly familiar with the following product but there are now devices known as " lone worker alarms ".
    Not sure how and to what extent they work but maybe something to consider.
    Good luck with everything.
     
  8. sugar-rush123

    sugar-rush123 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the advice i will look into it if needed
     
  9. tigger

    tigger Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just an additional point, in addition to the requirement for an employer to make reasonable adjustments for disabilities they are also required to do a workplace assessment for pregnancy. Since you're type 2 I'm assuming you've only been put on insulin as a result of the pregnancy? If so then this may fall under this heading which in some ways is easier to handle. Send them an email asking them to do a workplace assessment given your pregnancy and mention that you have been put on insulin as a result of the pregnancy which requires you to take breaks, eat etc and you would like to discuss this in detail. In particular you are concerned about being put into a position where this occurs and there is no one around to assist as if you have a hypoglycaemic episode it can develop into a coma and ultimately brain damage if not treated rapidly (overegging it a bit buy hey).

    Therefore can you please have a meeting on your return to work so this can be assessed as soon as possible.

    In the meantime for your own personal safety you should ensure you always have food to hand, particularly glucose tablets so you can treat the hypo immediately.

    Hope that helps.
     
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  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Even non diabetic workers have the right to have time to prepare themselves at the end of a normal shift before doing overtime - at least that was the case when I was working long hours.
    I'd be very concerned about being the sole member of staff without some means to raise the alarm in case of an emergency. There are too many nutters around these days - and too much paperwork if you hit them with a chair - you should get together with any other members of staff who are left in sole charge and ask for some sort of personal alarm system to be organised. Something silent, not a hooter to alert intruders to your position which was one option I declined.
    Your personal situation is a whole extra layer which should be addressed, but basic common sense seems to be lacking in your workplace at the moment.
     
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