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Newbie!

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Seales18, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. Seales18

    Seales18 · Member

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    Hi Guys

    I have been diagnosed with type 2 today. Iv been borderline for a few years and today I passed the border.

    I’m about to start taking metformin Tablets 2 a day
     
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  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi Seales and welcome!
    First let me tag in @daisy1 for her useful info post. You’ve come to the right place for help and support, it’s great here :)
    Aside from taking Metformin have you been advised of anything else to get on top of this. Any dietary advice? Also do you know what your results are exactly? Fire away with any questions that occur to you, there’ll always be someone to help.
     
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  3. Smallbrit

    Smallbrit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome - this is a very friendly forum and you'll find lots of good information and people who've had similar experiences, so have a good read around.

    I also hovered around prediabetes readings for a few years before I passed the post (in my case it was more like speed raced past the post) into T2. I got my numbers back down by a substantial reduction in the amount of carbs I ate, which quite a few people here also follow, with a low carb, high fat way of eating.
     
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  4. Seales18

    Seales18 · Member

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    Hi Thank You

    No I only no my reading was 48mmol I think that’s the right unit. Been told to look at diet and include more exercise.
     
  5. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Did they mention HOW to look at diet? because that's often conveniently left out. ;) Welcome, in any case. Hope we'll be able to be of some use to you.

    I'm making dinner right now so don't have much time to type, but the best advice is this: Get yourself a meter. Check out Dr. Jason Fung's books or Dietdoctor.com. And know you'll be okay. :)
    Jo
     
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  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    That is an only just diagnosable level. Were you asked if you wanted medication with full information or just told to take it? I was diagnosed a little higher than you and my diabetic nurse was happy for me to try lifestyle changes before taking medications and risking side effects etc. I truly believe many medics just assume us patients won’t actually chnage much so medication is the route to go. (With progressive decline the norm). If you’re motivated enough to make some changes you have choices.

    A huge % of type 2 in this forum eat some form of low carb. Carbs turn into glucose as soon as they are eaten raising blood sugars. Carbs are sugar, bread, rice, pasta, potatoes and grains (cereals inc oats etc) as the most obvious and highest. When we reduce these we make up by eating more fat. It gives us energy and is not the demon it’s been made out to be the last 40 years.

    I feel you don’t have one you’ll need a meter to test your bloods and see how different food and exercise affects you. We each are a little different. You may have been told you don’t need to. That’s just plain wrong. Even if you only do it for a while it is so worthwhile to learn what works and what doesn’t.

    Websites such as dietdoctor.com and ditchthecarbs.com are great to get some information and ideas. Ask lots of questions in here too.

    Many of us have turned things around and lost excess weight in the process
     
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  7. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    As others have said you have only just reached a diabetic level. You could just get it down to a non diabetic level with cutting carbs, it would probably be worth a try first. Here’s the definition of each level and some info on how the HbA1c test works:
    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-test.html

    Oh and just a small note, HbA1c is measured in mmol/mol ;)
     
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  8. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    hi @Seales18..

    i was 56 Hba1c and they let me try diet/exercise only.,...and i was gutted, when i went back after 2nd test.
    i'd give it a real good go, but my numbers went up to 57.

    currently on metformin as well, one at each end of day, soon to be two at each end..at least until i get my next Hba1c test,,
    (prays for good score).

    i got the same advice ..diet, exercise..but little other assistance until my desmond course, but by then i had sought out Dr Google, and luckily arrived here, where i have been very well informed in so many aspects of this condition AND ways to manage and look after myself.

    I listened to the advice, cut back on the carbs, did some more exercise, (but no where near enough )
    and i've lost over 2 Stone since august.

    Great bunch, helpful and supportive.

    Hope you get the same help and pleasure from the forum as i did.
     
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  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi!

    Firstly don’t panic. It’s not a life sentence and you’ve been diagnosed early. I was a metabolic train wreck with complications when diagnosed and I’ve come out the other side healthier and happier than ever. In many ways it’s worth getting diabetes just to beat it and discover a new way to live.

    First of all buy The Diabetes Code by Jason Fung. In the meantime tuck into the wealth of information on here. There’s lots to learn but make baby steps and you’ll soon be an expert.

    Good luck and of course join in the debates with everyone. Knowledge is power. Above all else, don’t get down...it really doesn’t have to be the chronic degenerative disease that certain organisations want you to think it is. I’m actually glad I got it and recovered!

    :D
     
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  10. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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  11. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Seales18
    Hello Seales 18 and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.

    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  12. Seales18

    Seales18 · Member

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    They gave me a information booklet IMG_5821.jpg

    Iv been reading that and that’s all really
     
  13. Seales18

    Seales18 · Member

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    Didn’t get a choice really I’m 30 years old and she said she needs to treat it now as I’m far to young to be having it.

    I do have a meter I won a contour one in a competition a month or 2 ago but the strips are stupidly expensive for them :(.

    Diet wise I told her I had started eating brown bread instead of white and eating more fruit and also eating fruit and fibre type cereal and she was happy with that.

    Only downside to the my job which is a van driver I find meals hard not to have a sandwich or chicken and pasta etc for lunch as I struggle to do anything else while I’m out or never know if I will be in the branch at lunch or not.
     
  14. Yellredder

    Yellredder Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Seales, I'm newly diagnosed too with 48. I drive a lot with my job so never know whether I'll be eating lunch at my desk or in my car. I find that Morrisons Protein bread is good for my levels for a sandwich, but it's one of those items that if they have it on the shelf you need to stock up! When they don't have it I take strips of chicken, cheese and cucumber for lunch as these are easily eaten wherever! I was given a prescription for Metformin last year when I was pre-Diabetic at 47 from our Diabetic lead with the advice that I take it away and think about it before actually getting the meds if I got them at all. I didn't get the meds. So I started low-carbing. I was also sent to a dietitian who suggested low carb too, but she also said to swap potatoes for sweet potatoes and this has been a mistake! I've now got a meter so I have discovered how bad sweet potatoes are - and also how bad my cereal is (which was fine when I had gestational diabetes, but not now!) So deffo get a meter! Good luck!
     
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  15. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah... That might not mention what carbs do to T2's... I'm at the doc's waitingroom at the moment, but there's so much to learn. (And so much better to feel). Will get back to you later today!)
     
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  16. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    100% agree.
    Find it incredible, that we have , if you could think of it in such terms, an ALLERGY to certain carbs, and they can have a major impact on our our health, in the short term by way of lack of energy, feeling poorly, etc .. and in the long term with some pretty undesirable complications

    But without a meter you'll struggle to find out what the worst ones for raising those allergic reactions are, for YOU, as an individual.

    Would doctors really tell someone who had suffered an allergic reaction to nuts, really be told to "just be careful what you eat" or would Doctors be more specific and test until they could say "DON'T EAT NUTS !!" . ???

    That to me, is the usefulness of a meter.

    Have to wonder how many medical professionals, would quite happily blindly just take whatever medication they were given, without doing any research into ways that might help improve the risks associated with diabetes .
     
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    #16 jjraak, Dec 6, 2018 at 7:32 AM
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018
  17. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    You’ve been given pretty typical advice tbh. This advocates brown carbs rather than white ones. I guess it’s slightly better because they spike a little more slowly but they still spike! Most of us in here would tell you to avoid those too. Same for any starchy food that for some frankly bizarre reason is recommended by many medics. That I should precisely the food that causes us trouble.

    I totally agree the convince of bread is hard to replace. Try another post specifically asking for cold lunchbox ideas. I do a lot of cold meats and cheeses, Greek yoghurt, nuts etc in lunch bag with ice pack for freshness if I need such a meal. The ditch the carbs Facebook page has a lunchbox section. It’s aimed at kids but could be upscaled for adults.

    Personally theres no way I’d take drugs before trying diet changes first, especially at your levels. But that is my personal choice. She probably doesn’t believe it can be turned around (many drs don’t - because they don’t give people the right tools and information to do that).

    Strips are expensive. Around £20-30 per 50 depending on which ones. eBay sometime has some bargains but check the dates are ok. If you possibly can do get some even for a short time. It’s a huge invaluable investment in your future health. There are some cheaper strips out there. I think it’s @Rachox who has a post about those. Even if you just test a few meals immediately before eating and 2 hrs after to get a sense of what’s awful about And what’s good.

    You are young to have this but that’s all the more reason to take action and remove the things that make it worse as you have a long way to go if your choices are making things worse instead of better.
     
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  18. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Thanks for the tag @HSSS

    Here are some meters that are popular on the forum:

    Taken from a post by @Bluetit1802 as she wrote it so nicely:


    The most popular meters for self funding T2's are the Codefree and the Tee2 because the strips are much cheaper than other meters, and you need a lot of strips. You can't buy them in pharmacies.


    Try here for the Codefree meter

    http://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/blood-glucose-monitor/


    and here for the extra strips

    http://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/sd-codefree-test-strips-to-be-used-only-with-the-sd-monitor/


    There are discount codes if you buy in bulk.

    5 packs 264086

    10 packs 975833


    The Tee2 is here

    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-plus-blood-glucose-meter/


    Don’t forget to check the box that you have diabetes so you can buy VAT free. (for either meter)
     
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  19. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetes UK is a joke. Please throw that pamphlet away and get your info from diabetes.co.uk

    :)
     
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  20. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Expert

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    There’s always a choice. They only advise (poorly sometimes) not enforce.

    bread, most fruit, possibly except berries and avocado, and all cereals will push your numbers up not down for almost every diabetic. A meter will confirm this. There are a few lucky exceptions but not many.
     
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