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Newbie

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by LTGx, Sep 18, 2020.

  1. LTGx

    LTGx LADA · Newbie

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    Hi all,

    I was recently diagnosed on the (less than a week) after lots of worrying symptoms. The doctor has said it’s most likely type two but I don’t fit the usual characteristics; I’m only 28, in a healthy weight, have a good diet, low blood pressure, average cholesterol etc so she couldn’t really explain why I had gotten so poorly so quickly. So I am being referred to a specialist endocrinologist. Honestly I’m just exhausted and scared. I started on metformin Saturday evening and the nausea and general gastrointestinal discomfort is a real issue. I’ve never been a sugary type person and I removed carbs from my diet straight away, I’ve been having lots of tuna salad, good veggies etc but I can’t seem to shake the exhaustion, nausea, generally feeling awful. Any advice? I’ve got my first diabetic review appointment next week, I’ve not really been given any other information, I don’t know what my actually blood test numbers were, she didn’t actually advise me about changing my diet it’s just common knowledge that diet plays a big part. Honestly I’m just really lost and poorly and don’t really know what to do. I was just given 6 boxes of metformin with a load of instructions and sent on my way. Is it worth me contacting the doctors again? I’ve been off work also because of the side effects(?) and for the week before I was diagnosed up until now. Again, the doctor didn’t mention anything about having time off work so I’m worried I’m just being a wuss. And advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
     
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  2. LTGx

    LTGx LADA · Newbie

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    Just to add to this, I've just managed to check my results online and my HbA1c was 81.
     
  3. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You're not a wuss. The side effects of metformin can be absolutely brutal. Get back in touch with your doc and ask for a C-peptide and GAD test, those'll determine your type. (While you're at it, ask for slow release metformin, that gets tolerated better by some). You could wait for the endo to do the same tests, but my thinking is, the sooner you know, the better. Have you got a meter? You need to test around meals to see what they do to you. If you're still sky-high on a low carb diet, T1 becomes ever more likely. Also, as you're in limbo, make sure you have a meter that can also test for ketones. Those are more expensive in purchase and use, but you can get a different one down the line. You don't want high blood sugars and high ketones... A lot of T1's get diagnosed once they've had diabetic ketoacidosis, and you don't want to let it get that far.

    Good call on the carbs... The metformin'll only make a small dent in your blood sugars if you're a T2. Diet will do a whole lot more. If it's not having any effect at all, and your meter'll tell you, be a dog with a bone on the T1 testing.

    Good luck!
    Jo
    PS: This includes some stuff about testing blood sugars effectively.: https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html
     
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  4. sgm14

    sgm14 · Member

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    > HbA1c was 81.

    HbA1c is the average over 3 months, so you may only have seen the symptoms over the last week or so, but your HbA1c would suggest your blood sugars have been higher for much longer.

    >she didn’t actually advise me about changing my diet it’s just common knowledge that diet plays a big part.

    A very bad diet is considered a 'contributing factor' but not a cause. In your case your diet may not be considered bad and a lot of gps are cautious about recommending dietary changes in such cases.

    > general gastrointestinal discomfort

    When I was first put on metformin, the doctor warned me that this was one of the possible side-effects and that there were alternatives medicines. If you are unable to work because of this, then I think you should certainly mention this to your doctor. (No need to suffer another week if you don't need to).

    > Any advice? I’ve got my first diabetic review appointment next week, I’ve not really been given any other information

    Everyone is probably just leaving it until then. (I got the distinct impression that doctors didn't consider a possible type 2 diagnosis as urgent, probably on the basis that if your blood sugar has been high for over three months, another week would make much difference. Also metformin takes a while to bring your blood sugars down, so they will expect your bloods sugar to be high for some time to come.) You will probably be given a meter and more information at your review.
     
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  5. Bex72

    Bex72 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, my HbA1c was similar to yours and I got a diagnosis of T2DM after sudden onset symptoms. Although I am 48. I felt ill and stressed very quickly. I was given Metformin and this made me feel constantly nauseous. I went on the slow release version but still felt awful. I struggled to put food in my mouth, it would take an hour to eat a small meal. I adopted low carb eating straight away too. My practice nurse suggested persevering with Metformin as it can take a couple of weeks to get settled.
    I understand that most people find Metformin to be a really useful, effective medication.
    I couldn't stand the nausea and stopped it after 6 days. I am using a blood glucose monitor and managing with diet alone and it is working really well. 6 weeks in and I feel fantastic and see the diagnosis as a blessing. It took a few weeks to feel OK on low carb and overcome constipation and migraines. It also involved grieving for the loss of foods I loved. Once these obstacles were cleared it has felt like plain sailing.
    My gp practice have only expressed concern about my approach. Without this forum I would have been lost.
    Good luck with your journey and well done for what you have achieved so far. I hope things get easier for you soon, I feel your pain. B xx
     
  6. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welome,

    You have already received great advice. I agree with @JoKalsbeek that you should invest in a meter and also test your ketones.

    I agree that ditching the carbs is a great way to start. You may or may not be a type 2 and as you don't fit the 'usual' profilings;e I think that it is reasonable to ask for tests to rule out being a type 1.

    the link provided by @JoKalsbeek is a s great place to start.

    Good luck and welcome
     
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