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Newcastle Diet

Discussion in 'Low Calorie Diets' started by Tashaleigh1979, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Roy Taylor has written in MedScape which is published online. I made a separate post about it. It's very interesting. YOu can see my post here:



    Type 2 Diabetes: Etiology and Reversibility
    viewtopic.php?f=25&t=43951
     
  2. Trevorden

    Trevorden Type 2 · Member

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    Mr Doughty was barely diabetic in the first place and almost certainly could have corrected his blood glucose levels without the rigorous regime he adopted. Furthermore, having reduced his reading to 4.3 he decided that this was not low enough, and 3 days later was down to 4.1, getting very close to the "4's the floor" warning level for hypos !
    Consult your GP or diabetes specialist before embarking on any diet designed to control diabetes, particularly one not designed by practising doctors or specialist nurses.
     
  3. janeecee

    janeecee Other · Well-Known Member

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    Yorksman, the Newcastle Diet is NOT for everyone. Just how much more weight would I have to lose? My BMI is now 19.1 as a consequence of dietary control, possibly less as I don't weigh myself very often. As for weighing what you did at 21 as being the ballpark figure to aim for, I'm at that weight if not slightly lower. I've spent my entire adult life at around BMI 20, so how emaciated would I have to be before my beta cells "wake up"? I wrote to the esteemed professor 3 months ago and he never replied, so I can only assume he's only interested in obese and overweight people because he will reply to them—but not someone who is prediabetic and of low normal weight. I just wish people would stop hyping this up. Even the definition of "reversal" isn't exactly what it's hyped up to be.





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  4. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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    Hi again Janeecee. Is this diet something that I need to be aware of yet? Sorry if I'm interfering with the discussion.
     
  5. janeecee

    janeecee Other · Well-Known Member

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    Theres loads if info online if you google it. It's basically a crash diet for extreme weight loss, IF obesity is a factor in the first place. The most successful people lose 15+ kg or 20%(!!!!!!) of their body weight. If you're low-normal weight like me then it's hardly an option. Last time I weighed myself I was 4lb away from being clinically underweight, which is less than 2kg. I'm fed up with the hype and all these cut-and-paste quotes from the esteemed professor. I'm not saying his work isn't valuable—it is—but if you're not XXXL size it's not applicable.


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  6. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, not is the Newcastle diet for everyone, Roy Taylor doesn't recomment it either as I have been at pains to point out:

    "I would not recommend a very low calorie diet initially for most people with type 2 diabetes. Very strict diets may be considered for particular purposes, but a steady, patient, sustained approach to restriction of food intake will be best for most people."

    Nor does Taylor claim that weight loss is applicable for everyone:

    "This research is in “type 2 diabetes”, the usual common form of diabetes. There are some rare forms of diabetes which may be incorrectly called type 2 diabetes"

    .....None of these will respond in the same way as the common, true type 2 diabetes.

    see the FAQ:

    http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/di ... dy_000.pdf

    There's no reason to dismiss it simply because it does not apply to you. It is applicable to many type 2s and they may benefit from it.
     
  7. janeecee

    janeecee Other · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, exactly. More cut-and-paste quotes. I have read all it on the website. I don't have T1 or MODY/LADA, pancreatitis, a family history of diabetes, or any of that. I'm just a boring old prediabetic of the T2 variety, but without excess weight or metabolic syndrome risk factors.

    The ND is a WEIGHT LOSS diet. It will only help people who are overweight or obese, or have put on excess weight. It's not a diabetes treatment per se.

    All these people I see on here whinging about people saying diabetes is caused by obesity, yet the latest hyped up cure is guess what? A weight loss diet! The more weight lost the better, 15kg or more recommended. Certainly reversing obesity seems to work miracles, so go figure!

    Right now I don't know how low my weight is going to fall below normal just trying to keep my BG numbers under control. At this rate I might have to go on the ND just to fatten up a bit. Wouldn't that be ironic?


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  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Any thoughts on this?

    Today, I had a white bread sandwich (2 slices) with smoked salmon and salad filling and my bGs were 5.0, 9.2 and 4.2 ( at +0, +1 and +2). This peak is consistent with my last OGTT test which was 14.7 at +1:00 after 75g glucose which is about double the carbs of the sandwich. My HbA1C is 38, down from 58 five years ago and my GP, DN and the path lab. all say I am diabetes resolved. In fact, there have been experienced diabetics who are adamant that I never was diabetic in the first place. So both professionals and experienced diabetics are agreeing that my figures are fine for a non-diabetic. Who could argue with that wealth of experience. Therefore, I can only conclude that the above bG pattern is normal for me. So, I ask myself, why be scared of spiking? Isn't spiking perfectly natural? Isn't a spike as a result of glucose secretion into the blood which then triggers insulin secretion (hopefully)?

    If I assume that I have been diabetic only since diagnosis (5 years) as I can't go back any further than that, then, if my spiking is bad, would you expect me, by now, to be experiencing complications of one sort or the other and having a higher HbA1C?

    Either my GP, DN, path lab and experienced diabetics are all right or they're all wrong since they all agree with each other.

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  9. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    There is, as yet, no cure as such. My diagnosis of 'resolved' is not quite the same thing, unfortunately. However, it does mean that I am doing the right things for me and, provided I don't slip back into old habits, I hope I can continue to prevent a recurrence. Apart from the blood tests from the professionals, here is a selection of comments from other diabetics after I was classified as 'diabetes resolved' ... there's a bit of terminology there but I'm sure you'll get the general picture ...

    "Gezza, your results are excellent - but suggest you may not be not diabetic. Achieving those results without medication or carb restriction is unlikely for T2 patients."

    "What he has proved is the fact he is not a diabetic, he does not even fit the profile of a person with glucose intolerance."

    "To cut a long story short, Gezza is on 250 carbs a day, no meds and holds non diabetic BG numbers. "

    "Gezza was reporting a few weeks ago, he was a type two diabetic ("now resolved"), holding non diabetic BG numbers, using nil meds and consuming 250+ carbs per day, very unusual to say the least."
     
  11. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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    Wow ... you must be feeling really pleased and relieved.
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Yes I am of course. But I will still have annual check ups just in case.
     
  13. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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    Yes I am of course. But I will still have annual check ups just in case.[/quote]

    Well at least that gives me some hope.
     
  14. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Well at least that gives me some hope.[/quote]

    Well, you've yet to see your GP again. May be good news.
     
  15. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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    Yes, feeling a bit better now. The forums seem very busy at the moment. I thought it would all be about diabetes
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    Yes, feeling a bit better now. The forums seem very busy at the moment. I thought it would all be about diabetes[/quote]

    Just feel free to ask any questions. They are a very friendly bunch here.
     
  17. Mireille

    Mireille · Well-Known Member

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    Just feel free to ask any questions. They are a very friendly bunch here.[/quote]

    Thanks ... will do.
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous · Guest

    By the way, if you want to read Dr Bernstein's book I'll make sure your on the list.
     
  20. SaravananOrg

    SaravananOrg · Newbie

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    I am on NewCastle Diet.
    - I started out with BMI 24 and Fasting Sugar level of 128 (under 7).
    - After dieting, my BMI is 22 and the FS level reached 89 (4.9) this morning.

    Have a quick question: When should I STOP dieting? Should I look for some target weight? Or should I look for wiping off my moderate tummy before I stop dieting? Should I hold <5 FS levels for a few days and then call the diet off?

    Can someone throw some light on this please. To the best of my knowledge, Newcastle hasn't provided adequate guidelines on this.

    Thanks in advance.
     
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